Ambulance Safety Standards Draft Released

first_imgThe attached draft is a Committee working document. It is being circulated to solicit input from the public prior to publication as a Report on Proposals (ROP). To submit a proposal, please use the proposal form that is attached to this draft. Proposals must be received by the Secretary, Standards Council, at NFPA, by 5:00 PMEDST on Wednesday, December 15, 2010. The National Fire Protection Association has released a draft document on ambulance safety standards and is seeking public input. The Technical Committee on Ambulances is seeking public input on this draft as well as the National Truck and Equipment Association (NTEA), Ambulance Manufacturer’s Division (AMD) Standards that are referenced in the draft. The Ambulance Committee will review the public input when considering the options as follows: keep the external AMD references as used in the draft; maintain the AMD references but add the committee’s amendments, or the technical committee develop testing criteria without using external reference within the NFPA 1917Ambulance Standard.The AMD Standards can be viewed/downloaded here.last_img read more

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Review: Votec VRC all-road bike finds happy medium versatility, between road & gravel

first_imgWhen Votec debuted their carbon VRC endurance road bike back in midsummer, we wondered just how off-road ready the all-road bike would be. Coming off the heels of a successful & affordable VRX gravel bike that sold out faster than they could keep up, Votec has refocused on what they do best – reasonably-priced drop bar bikes for mixed surface riding. Thus, this new Votec Road Carbon… VRC bike finds a nice all-road sweet spot, balancing geometry that is stable yet quick from smooth asphalt, to dirt roads, to even a bit of proper gravel…2020 Votec VRC a carbon endurance road bike for all-roadsVotec calls the VRC their ideal take on what a modern road bike should be, venturing more into all-road for the increased versatility over any road surface. Figuring out what is the difference between an all-road and a gravel bike often comes down to personal preference, how you want to ride, and just how gnarly your gravel is going to get…Some gravel riders like to push the limits into terrain that might be better suited by a proper mountain bike…photo by Stephan Geiß…while others might just be riding rough asphalt & cobblestones, or hunting the holy grail of buff dirt & gravel roads away from car traffic.Personally, I don’t really like being confined to one type of road or another. And that’s probably where the Votec VRC shines best, with a quick-feeling road ride feel that’s happy to get dirty when necessary.Endurance all-road geometryTo make the mix of on-road handling work with off-road capabilities, Votec mixes mostly road-like steep-ish angles with a slightly forward position, endurance-focused wheelbase & a lot of bottom bracket drop. Frame reaches tend to be a bit compact for similarly sized road bikes (or especially compared to gravel bikes), with slightly longer endurance-oriented chainstays to fit big tire clearances in and a slightly longer wheelbase similar to other modern endurance road bikes.My medium test bike for example was a bit more slack that many road-only bikes with a 72° headtube, which paired with short 378mm frame reach & all-road-ready 414mm chainstays, yet a short for all-road 991mm wheelbase.(For comparison with two similarly focused endurance road bikes I’ve spent time on recently – the medium Canyon Endurace gets a 73° headtube, 382mm reach, 415mm stays & 990mm wheelbase; the medium Merida Scultura Endurance gets a 73° headtube, 380mm reach, 418mm stays & 1001mm wheelbase.)photo by Stephan GeißThe result is that I put on a 10mm longer than stock steam and was rewarded with a stable position on the bike and a slightly forward weight balance that lent a quick but predictable feel to handling, on or off-road – a happy medium.All-road setup OverviewThe version of the new Votec all-road bike I spent the second half of the summer riding was a medium VRC Pro in Norwegian blue that retails for 3000€. Outfitted with a Shimano Ultegra mid-compact 52/36T crankset & wide enough 11-30 cassette, it offered a good gearing range for varied terrain, but definitely leans towards hard surface road riding.My test bike was equipped with the standard 19mm internal alloy Mavic Ksyrium wheels, but had 32mm WTB Expanse tires on it rather than the stock 30mm Vittoria Corsa Controls – presumably because Votec knew I wasn’t likely to stick to the tarmac. To experiment a bit in more versatility, I also spent time with some 33mm knobby Greim Pro cyclocross tires and 35mm G-One Allround gravel tires fitted – covering a broader range of all roads.Votec VRC Pro – Tech detailsphoto by Stephan GeißA number of unique details stand out on the VRC, like the ‘VR Knot’ seat cluster that incorporates a conventional-clamping seatpost binder that sits flush with the toptube, and also allows the seatstays to slip past for additional comfort. The VR-Knot was easy to adjust and didn’t give me any troubles (like some wedge-style clamps can). And the decoupling of seatstays from the seattube surely made it feel like rough road vibrations didn’t make it up to the saddle.photo by Stephan GeißThe VRC has internal cable routing with a single modular port in common spot at the top of the downtube. But its fork routing is a bit more unique, with a small flat section of the crown extended out to the side, allowing for the front brake line to drop straight down into the top of the fork, while staying clear of the headtube.One detail feature that seems a bit odd now is the VRC’s adopting of Mavic’s Speed Release quick release thru-axle standard. A good idea mixing the benefits of QRs & security of thru-axles without having to set you axle down on the ground when you take a wheel out, SpeedRelease never really caught on. All of the stock VRC builds do include Mavic wheels though, and the system works really well. And Votec does offer separate 12mm bolt-on axles that make the bike compatible with any other standard thru-axle wheels.VRC Pro – Actual weightWith tubes inside of the slightly larger than stock WTB tires, my medium test bike weighed in at 8.59kg (18.9lb). That’s just 200g more than Votec’s claim, and for sure setting the bike up tubeless with the included valves will make up for it, although it is unclear if the stock Vittoria tires are the TLR version.Riding Impressions on the Votec VRCMost of the kilometers I rode on the VFC were actually on-road (seriously, I realize these photos may be a bit deceiving), but I can’t think of a single ride I took on the bike that didn’t leave the tarmac at least once. That’s really where the VRC shines – riding quiet dead-end backroads, then connecting with a dirt road alongside a farmer’s field or gravel road through the forest to the next village.photo by Stephan GeißNow don’t get me wrong. As I alluded to back in July with my first impressions on the all-road VRC – Votec is pretty clear that this isn’t actually meant to be a gravel bike. Even with room for 35mm tires plus a decent amount of clearance you can fit pretty off-road capable tires in here – this VRC rides best on the road with something around a 30-32mm tire.That seems to hot the sweet spot for quick on-road feel, smoothing out rough riding surfaces, and still feeling fast over hardpack dirt & gravel sectors.There is room for mud though, especially if you swap in a set of cross tires. I personally felt better with a semi slick tread than these mud tires, because the low BB height is going to keep you from doing anything crazy off-road in any case. Bigger gravel tires like the 35mm G-One added extra volume, but didn’t really improve the ride enough to be worth the reduced clearance.And about the only real nit to pick if you want to run off-road-ready tires near that 35mm upper limit, would probably be the potential for toe overlap. A result of the short reach/short front center dimension combined with larger diameter tires on the VRC is the dreaded toe overlap.I normally ride a medium road/all-road bike and am used to almost 1cm more of frame reach. Instead of sizing up the frame, I sized up the stem, and stuck with an M. The result was that when I mounted taller CX tires, my size 43 shoe (with cleats pretty far back) crossed paths with the front tire. It was never actually an issue while riding, but something that doesn’t happen often in M or larger bikes. But mixing big tires with a compact front end, and it is no huge surprise.But I would recommend riders on the bubble about size choice, to size up to keep it from happening.The VRC is ready to ride any road. There’s no bikepacking or other major adventure accessory mounts (although it does have hidden full-coverage fender mounts). No 650b gravel wheel compatibility.It is a road bike. Just one for any and all roads – a bike with a surprisingly comfortable rear end that makes slipping off-road feasible to extend the reach of your road rides, much thanks to fast-rolling, gravel-capable tires.While the VRC isn’t really a gravel bike, it does hint of what could possibly be in the works from Votec for heading further off-road. Their alloy VRX was quite popular, and I’ve spotted a few riders tackling a good bit of gravel on this all-road bike. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a large volume, more knobby tire evolution of this bike in the future – taking advantage of the VRC’s unique design features, with maybe even more comfort over bumpier terrain…The new carbon VRC all-road bike is available now, direct from Votec in five stock sizes (S-XXL), three different colors, four complete bike builds – with pretty much all versions in stock and available for delivery across Europe now. For full details on pricing & options can be found in our original in-depth tech coverage of the Votec VRC launch from July here.Votec.delast_img read more

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Bicycle Holiday Wishlist, By Nick (not THAT Nick)

first_imgPrimary: Paul Components Flat Bed Rack – Anything by Paul Components is done right, and done beautifully.  I think the flatbed rack (in silver) would be a great addition to any commuter bike.Paul will sell you one direct from his website (provided they are in stock) for $199.Secondary: Sram Apex Groupset – I am ready to build a touring bike, and this is the groupset I intend to use.  No triple chainset up front for me!  That 11-32 rear cassette and compact gearing up front is exactly what I need.Google shopping says you can get a groupset for around $700.  Check out Sram’s site for all the details.Mountain BikeSalsa Cycles Fargo – Mountain biking is not something I have had the pleasure of doing often.  I live in a small apartment with very limited bike storage.  However, I often envision myself packing up for a month or two and ridding wherever the heck I feel like.  To do that, I am pretty sure I would want want the Fargo as my trusty steed.Full details are ready to be consumed by your brain here.  Expect to pay $1650 if you choose to make this yours.Road or Cyclocross BikeSpot Brand Mod SS – As mentioned above, I have limited off road experience.  But I do know that I like a simple bike.  The Mod SS is a single speed, belt drive bike with a decent parts pick.  And, its orange!  Count me in.Spot Brand will gladly sell you this beauty for $3299 at their website. Primary: Topeak Brass Super Chuck – This mightily replacement chuck for floor pumps sure would save me the hassle of changing a flat every time I rip a valve stem away from a tube.  And since my floor pump seems to be turning into utter crap, this would be a great add on.This can be purchased at WheelFine Imports for $27.95Secondary: Park Tools TW-6 – I am not a shop mechanic by any means, but I find myself doing more and more of my own work.  This is one of the few major tools I am missing, and I would love to have this in my tool box.If you want to add this to your tool box to, do so over at JensonUSA.com for $119.95Clothing No, it’s not jolly old St. Nick’s wishlist, it’s our commuter from the northwest Nick:The holiday season has arrived!  There are no sugar plumbs dancing in my dreams though.  This year it’s all about gear.  Jump past the break to see what I hope to find under my tree this year…Bike Toolscenter_img Primary: Showers Pass Touring Shoe Cover – You may have heard this before, but it rains a lot here in Portland, OR.  Don’t worry though, local company Showers Pass has you covered (literally).  I wear a Showers Pass rain jacket almost daily and I would be lost without it.  A nice addition to anyone’s bad weather clothing lineup are these shoe covers.  They are durable, walkable, and have an easy rear entry design.You can buy these direct from Showers Pass for $70.Secondary: Oregon Cyclewear 3/4 Messenger Pants – I have two pair of these, and I pretty much live in them all weekend long.  They are comfortable, durable, and have all the pockets I need, including a rear pocket that holds my u-lock.  And if you are going to be out at night they have reflective piping.  They carry both men’s and women’s specific sizing.Oregon Cyclewear sells direct via their website.  Their 3/4rd pants run $60 per pair, or two for $99.89.Componentlast_img read more

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Collaboration Squared Upgrades “Always On” Video Window Portal

first_imgCollaboration Squared has upgraded its always-on videoconferencing portal Video Window.Video Window is a platform that creates an extension of physical space for inter-office and remote employee communication. The new Video Window Office adds features attention-grabbing features by allowing users to tap on the screen to “knock” to the far side. (No calls to set up, no links to join — just click “join audio,” and you are on.) Video Window Remote works on a laptop or desktop computer and allows home-based employees to feel present and connected with coworkers.Video Window is not just another “videoconferencing app,” according to Collaboration Squared. It was created instead to connect two or more office common areas, to make it feel like you are in the same physical space. Typically Video Window is installed on large 55”+ displays in either landscape or portrait. The working hours are preconfigured to automate the process of the always-on connections completely.One of the main focuses of the platform is how the audio functions for privacy. While the video may be on for the day, the audio is off by default. Each device audio is separated, meaning colleagues can have side conversations throughout the day without disturbing the rest of the group.The remote team members start the day with video off but can see live statuses of their other teammates and devices in their assigned group. When they are ready to get on video, they just click on a video toggle switch and are instantly in. They can turn the video feed off and on throughout the day as they wish.Per Collaboration Squared, always-on doesn’t mean unsecured. From an IT security standpoint, you can talk only with people and devices within your specific group, administered via a central management console. Only registered authenticated users and devices can join the Video Window session to ensure no unwanted guests.last_img read more

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News Scan for Feb 01, 2018

first_imgMore yellow fever cases, deaths reported in BrazilA new report from Brazil’s Ministry of Health showed a steady rise in the number of yellow fever cases confirmed and suspected since an update posted last week. There are now 213 confirmed cases, 83 more than last week, and 1,080 suspected cases, an increase of 479 since the previous report.There have been a total of 81 deaths so far between Jul 1, 2017 and Jan 30, 2018, the Ministry of Health said. Between July of 2016 and January of 2017, Brazil reported a total of 468 confirmed yellow fever cases, including 147 deaths.Yellow fever cases tend to spike during the rainy, spring months in Brazil. There is still no evidence that urban Aedes aegypti mosquito populations are transmitting the virus. Instead, the Ministry of Health said all human cases remain caused by sylvatic spillover. The information was translated and posted on ProMED Mail, the online reporting system of the International Society for Infectious Diseases.As reported last week, a vaccination campaign is set to launch this month in some of Brazil’s most populous states, using both standard and fractional doses of the yellow fever vaccine. Both vaccines offer 99% protection against the virus within 1 month of administration.Jan 30 ProMED Mail postJan 24 CIDRAP News story “Yellow fever case counts jump in Brazil” Lone star ticks off the hook for transmitting Lyme diseaseA review of 30 years’ worth of literature shows that the lone star tick is not capable of spreading the bacteria that causes Lyme disease to humans. The review was published yesterday in the Journal of Medical Entomology.Led byEllen Stromdahl, BCE, an entomologist at the US Army Public Health Center, the review of 60 published scientific journal articles failed to produce evidence that the tick (Amblyomma americanum) can spread Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease. In fact, there is evidence that the tick’s saliva destroys Borrelia burgdorferi.”Lone star tick saliva is a very effective barrier against B. burgdorferi—it literally explodes them,” said Graham Hickling, PhD, a tick researcher from the University of Tennessee who contributed to the review in an interview with Entomology Today. “Lone star ticks are constantly being exposed to B. burgdorferi as they feed on infected animals, but the bacteria species has never been cultured from a Lone Star tick in a lab. However, it has been cultured from rodents and blacklegged ticks in the Southeast.”The authors said that early literature detecting B. burgdorferi in lone star ticks used methods that were not Borrelia species-specific, and any spirochetes that were detected were likely other species.Jan 31 J Med Entomol study Jan 31 Entomology Today story First Seoul virus outbreak in United States and Canada described2017 brought the first Seoul virus outbreak to the United States and Canada, and emphasized the need for proper rodent handling, according to a report today in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).In December of 2016, a Wisconsin resident was hospitalized with fever and leukopenia, among other symptoms. The person owned an in-home rat breeding facility. Because of his or her contact with rats, the patient was tested for hantaviruses, including Seoul virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed the presence of Seoul virus in January of 2017, and an investigation was launched to identify additional human and rat infections.By March of 2017, 31 US ratteries with human and/or rat Seoul virus infections were discovered in 11 states, including 6 that exchanged rats with Canadian ratteries. A total of 17 people were infected with Seoul virus, with 8 becoming ill and 3 hospitalized. All cases recovered fully.Seoul virus is a hantavirus in the Bunyaviridae family, found most commonly in the Norway rat.”Pet rat owners should be aware of the potential for Seoul virus infection,” the authors of the report write. “To keep themselves and their pets healthy, all persons with rodent contact should avoid bites or scratches and practice good hand hygiene, especially children and persons with compromised immune systems.”Feb 2 MMWR report CDC posts travel notices for malaria in Brazil, yellow fever in NigeriaThe CDC posted two new travel notices, one a level 2 alert warning of a malaria outbreak in Brazil’s Bahia state and the other a level 1 alert that relates to yellow fever activity in Nigeria.In Brazil, the mosquitoes that spread malaria are present in Bahia state in the eastern part of the country, but the disease isn’t usually found there. The CDC said the outbreak in the town of Wenceslau Guimaraes probably began with an infected person who traveled from Para state, in northern Brazil, where the disease is known to spread. The CDC’s level 2 precaution urges travelers to practice enhanced precautions, specifically for travelers to the affected town to take antimalarial medication.Meanwhile, the notice for Nigeria relates to an outbreak that has been under way since September 2017, with lab-confirmed cases reported in at least seven states. Vaccination campaigns are ongoing in the country. The CDC’s level 1 watch urges travelers to practice usual precautions, and the CDC recommends anyone 9 months or older who will travel to any part of Nigeria to be vaccinated against yellow fever.Jan 31 CDC travel notice on malaria in Brazil Jan 30 CDC travel notice on yellow fever in Nigerialast_img read more

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New regulator for heavy vehicles opens in Australia

first_imgAustralia’s first national heavy vehicle regulator – Heavy Vehicle National Law (NHVR) – was launched today, managing NHVAS accreditation, performance based standards design and vehicle approval.The NHVR will provide a set of laws for all heavy vehicles across all states of Australia.  The goal of the policy is to reduce compliance costs across borders by streamlining regulations, and to improve productivity for logistics companies.The NHVR new website was also launched today, providing detailed information about the new regulations, as well as the ability to register vehicles and pay fees upfront, online. It can be visited here: www.nhrv.gov.auDetailed information regarding the new heavy lift transport regime in Australia can be read in the November/December edition of HLPFI magazine, written by Australasia correspondent Dave MacIntyre.Please follow the link to view HLPFI November/December online: www.heavyliftpfi.com/content/issue.aspxwww.nhvr.gov.aulast_img read more

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Gutormsen named CEO at Höegh Autoliners

first_imgGutormsen served as ceo at Leif Höegh & Co between 1992 and 2008. He has been a non-executive director of Höegh Autoliners since 2014.Höegh Autoliners’ chief financial officer, Ingrid-Due Gundersen, has also left the company. Andreas Enger, chairman of Posten Norge, has been appointed as the role.Leif Høegh, chairman, and Jan Kjaervik, deputy chairman, said in a joint statement: “We are very pleased that Thor Jørgen Guttormsen will lead Höegh Autoliners with the rest of the senior management team. Thor Jørgen knows the company well and the board and shareholders have confidence in his ability to develop the company further. We thank Ivar Myklebust for his service to the company.”www.hoeghautoliners.comlast_img read more

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Egypt condemns Turkey parliament’s approval of Libya troop deployment

first_imgLibya’s Prime Minister visits Egypt FILE: Turkish Armed Forces’ armoured vehicles and armoured personnel carriers, carrying Turkish commandos move towards to Syrian border at Turkey’s Kilis on October 09, 2019./ Getty ImagesEgypt has condemned Turkey parliaments vote to allow troop deployment in conflict-ravaged Libya, the country’s Foreign Ministry said in a statement.Egypt said any such deployment could “negatively affect the stability of the Mediterranean region” and called on the international community to urgently respond to the move.The Turkish parliament on Thursday voted 352-184 to approve the deployment of troops in Libya to support Fayez Sarraj’s Tripoli-based government fend off forces loyal to strongman Khalifa Hafter who has pledged to take over the capital.The approval now gives the Turkish government the greenlight to send troops to Libya for one year.Libya has been dogged by war since December 2011, and the situation heightened earlier this year when self-styled Libyan National Army chief Gen. Hafter pledged to take over Tripoli from the U.N.-backed government led by Prime Minister Sarraj.Hafter announced in early December a final push to take Tripoli from Sarraj’s government, unleashing heavy clashes on the southern edges of the city.Since 2011, the Libyan war has killed thousands and displaced millions as militant groups and human trafficking cells sought to impose their command in various regions across the country.Earlier this week, France and Egypt called for the “greatest restraint” by Libyan and international authorities to avoid an escalation of the conflict that has rocked the country for months.Mediation teams hope the warring factions can strike a deal to restore lasting peace in the country.Related Egypt Mulls Military Intervention in Libyacenter_img Turkey seeks to speed up Libya troop deploymentlast_img read more

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Four-state road study reveals ag equipment’s impact

first_imgWhen the Professional Nutrient Applicators Association of Wisconsin (PNAAW) formed a decade ago, it identified road and bridge issues as one of its top three priorities. The problem is that all types of farm equipment are getting larger and larger, while town roads are not designed to handle large and heavy loads.To find out what was really happening to the roads, PNAAW initiated a four-state, four-year $630,000 study. Partners in this endeavor included the state Departments of Transportation for Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin; Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin; Minnesota Pork Producers and other agribusinesses and associations.advertisementadvertisement Industry, including manure applicators, farm equipment manufacturers and tire manufacturers, stepped forward to lend equipment, experienced drivers and technical expertise.Kevin Erb, conservation professional development and training coordinator with the University of Wisconsin Extension , oversaw the study and has taken to the road himself to share the results.The main objective was to determine the pavement response to selected agricultural equipment compared to the pavement response of a typical 80,000-pound, five-axle semi tractor-trailer.Working at a Minnesota Department of Transportation test site, the group tested at three times of the year – when frost comes out of the ground in early March, the driest part of the year in August and a mid-point temperature time in November.Four types of pavement were tested:advertisement• Cell 84 (thick) – 5.5 inches of hot asphalt, nine-inch gravel base• Cell 83 (thin) – 3.5 inches of hot asphalt, eight-inch gravel base• Cell 32 – five inches of concrete, six-inch gravel base• Cell 54 – 7.5 inches of concrete, 12-inch gravel baseA wide variety of equipment was tested from 4,400-gallon tank trucks with radial or flotation tires to tractors pulling a 4,000-gallon dual-axle tanker up to a 9,500-gallon, quad-axle tanker, as well as terragators and a truck used by municipalities to haul sewage sludge.Results“Pavement damage did occur under certain conditions but not under others,” Erb says.advertisementSome observations included a wet spot in the subgrade of the thin asphalt that gave out early and propagated damage quite a ways out throughout the testing. The concrete cracked as well in the spring of 2008 and 2009.It was patched, but they did not get a good take on the repair so the section blew out almost immediately with the first few loads in August.Erb reports the key variables for road damage include axle weight, distance from the edge of the pavement and how the road is constructed and its drainage.Axle weightAxle weight was found to be a main factor in the study, more so than total vehicle weight ( see Table 1 ).Erb points out that the Case IH 335 with 9,500-gallon Houle tank had a gross weight of 134,200 pounds but, because of its six axles, the per-axle weight was 25,200 pounds.That was significantly less than the 33,900-pound axle weight of the John Deere 8230 with 6,000-gallon Husky tank that had a gross weight of 89,600 pounds.“If the equipment is not set up properly, there’s a dramatic difference in terms of damage,” Erb says. Therefore, it is important to see that the equipment is properly balanced.The 6,000-gallon Husky tank placed more weight on the rear axle, which increased the pressure on the road and resulted in the second-greatest rutting potential of equipment tested.The terragator had the highest amount of rutting potential because it places all of its weight on the very narrow lugs while moving on pavement. Third was the properly balanced 6,000-gallon tanker.The remainder of the equipment was about equal, but all forms of agricultural equipment were found to be more damaging than the 80,000-pound semi-truck.Distance from edgeThe asphalt strain and subgrade damage was reduced by 75 percent if the center of the tire was 16 or more inches away from the edge of the asphalt. Equipment operators can minimize damage by staying farther away from the edge of the road.Having a paved shoulder also helps, as long as it is not driven on, because this keeps the subgrade from being pushed out from under the edge of the road.Pavement construction“The quality of subgrade and asphalt is critical,” Erb says. “Where the contractor skimped us an inch, that’s where we blew it out.”Seasonal differences“Seasonally, we know this – spring is bad. We need to keep off of the road when the frost is leaving the subgrade,” Erb says.It is also important to remain off these roads anytime the subgrade is wet. Townships and cities should look at proper drainage of the subgrade to minimize these occurrences.Erb says they found less damage occurred in the morning (before 10 to 11 a.m.) than in the afternoon, no matter what time of year it was. Heaviest loads should be hauled early in the day.TiresThe study revealed that pounds per square inch (PSI) in tires impacts soil compaction but did not significantly impact asphalt or concrete pavement damage.When two tank trucks, one with radial tires and the other with flotation tires were compared, the radial tires did produce a slightly higher asphalt surface and subgrade strain but not enough to be significant. This difference happened to be greater when the trucks were empty.Based on data from the study, Erb was able to set up a computer model to determine if one million gallons of water is to be moved, which vehicle would cause the least bit of damage.On both the five-inch and seven-inch slabs of concrete, pavement fatigue was seen greatest with the terragator, followed by the unbalanced tanker and then the 4,400-gallon straight truck with radial tires. However, there was significantly less damage seen on the thicker pavement.For both thicknesses of asphalt, not one piece of equipment was dramatically worse than another. However, in terms of subgrade damage, both the 80,000-pound and 102,000-pound semi-trucks were much less damaging.Results of this study will now be used to determine how to extend the life of rural roads. ( Click here to read about some ideas already taking shape in Lee’s article in the March 21st issue of Progressive Dairyman . ) PDKaren LeeMidwest Editorkaren@progressivedairy.comlast_img read more

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