Premier League stats: The best pass completion rate – top ten REVEALED

first_imgAn incredible 62,170 passes have been made in the Premier League so far this season.Seven matches have been played and the league table is starting to take shape, with Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City setting the pace on 18 points.But it is Jurgen Klopp’s Liverpool who top the charts for total passes [4,227], while West Brom have completed the fewest [2,055]. So, which individual tops the charts for pass completion*?Click the right arrow, above, to see the top ten [in percentage] from least to most…Stats correct as of October 13 2016. *Minimum 250 passes.WIN! A SAMSUNG HOME CINEMA KIT AND YEAR’S SUBSCRIPTION TO SKY SPORTS, WITH SCRUFFS – CLICK HERE 10. Adam Forshaw, Middlesbrough – 89.45%: Click the right arrow, above, to see which other players make the top ten of the Premier League passing charts – The Boro midfielder, 24, has made 379 passes this term, completing 89.45% of them. 8. Jordan Henderson, Liverpool – 89.8% – The Reds captain has featured heavily for Jurgen Klopp’s side this season, completing 89.8% of his 588 passes. 10 9. Marouane Fellaini, Manchester United – 89.79% – The Belgian has made a total of 333 passes so far this season, completing 89.79% of those. 7. Mesut Ozil, Arsenal – 90% – The German playmaker likes his assists and these statistics show he is also a reliable and accurate distributor of the ball, completing 90% of his 380 passes. 10 2. John Terry, Chelsea – 91.6% – The Blues miss their captain when he is not playing and, even as a defender, these stats show his importance at the back. The 35-year-old sets the tone for Antonio Conte’s men, completing 91.6% of his 250 passes. 10 6. Laurent Koscielny, Arsenal – 90.06% – The French centre-back has been impressive for the Gunners, completing 90.06% of 380 passes in six league games this season. 10 10 4. Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg, Southampton – 90.79% – The summer arrival from Bayern Munich, a favourite of Pep Guardiola’s when he was manager of the German club, has delivered 90.79% of his 391 attempted passes. 10 10 10 3. N’Golo Kante, Chelsea – 90.93% – The Premier League champion has come under scrutiny since moving from Leicester. Despite being played in a deeper role by boss Antonio Conte, the 25-year-old still finds a teammate with the majority of his 452 attempted passes. 5. Ben Gibson, Middlesbrough – 90.37% – The 23-year-old defender, who scored in the home defeat to Tottenham, has proved to be a reliable distributor of the ball, delivering the majority of his 322 passes so far for Aitor Karanka’s Teessiders. 10 10 1. Santi Cazorla, Arsenal – 91.85% – The Spanish playmaker tops the charts in the Premier League, completing an impressive 91.85% of his 503 passes in seven appearances.last_img read more

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Hawksbee and Jacobs daily – Thursday, February 22

first_imgListen back as Paul is joined by Sam Delaney to bring you the best bits from Thursday’s Hawksbee and Jacobs show.Today’s show features Eamonn Holmes to talk about Manchester United’s uninspiring draw at Sevilla, as well as a snowboarder who towed himself onto a car whilst on his board!All that and the guys listen to the listeners’ tales of encounters they’ve had of celebrities in unusual and mundane places. Listen above or click here to download the podcast from iTunes.last_img read more

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Man still being quizzed about ramming of Garda car

first_imgA man is still being questioned in connection with the ramming of an unmarked Garda car in Carrigart on Tuesday morning.Two Gardai were injured in the incident but did not require hospital treatment.Their car was severely damaged in the incident and was rammed “multiple times”, according to a Garda spokesman. A man was arrested yesterday and taken to Carrigart Garda station for questioning.A Garda spokesman confirmed the man is still under arrest and is still being interviewed.Man still being quizzed about ramming of Garda car was last modified: September 3rd, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:arrestCarrigartGardaramminglast_img read more

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KwaZulu-Natal golf course on par with the best

first_imgPrince’s Grant was designed by top South African course designer Peter Matkovich. (Image: Chris Thurman)A favourable climate and wealth of pristine scenery make golf a popular sport in South Africa, with enough course designs and terrain to suit all handicaps.Prince’s Grant, a premier golf estate in KwaZulu-Natal province, is but one of the many choices on offer. With so many South African place names linked to royalty, first-time visitors to the resort could be forgiven for thinking that Prince’s Grant takes its name from some imperial benediction or other.A cursory glance at some of the country’s place names seems to suggest an almost national obsession with royalty: Chiefs, amaKhosi in isiZulu, and other traditional leaders provide one set of descriptors: from the new King Shaka International Airport near Durban, to the Chief Maqoma heritage route in the Eastern Cape and 2010 Fifa World Cup venue, the Royal Bafokeng Stadium in Rustenburg, North West province.Then there are the designations that date back to the colonial era and the days before the country became a republic, alluding to successive generations of British monarchs: King William’s Town (that’s William IV); George (King George III, in case you were wondering); Queenstown (named after Victoria); Prince Albert (after her husband), as well as Port Edward and Kind Edward School (in honour of a visit in 1925 by the Prince of Wales, who later became King Edward VII).But the story behind Prince’s Grant is altogether less regal. George Wilson Prince acquired the land by “deed of grant” in 1856 as a sub-division of a much larger farm called Hyde Park.Later, in the 19th century, indentured labourer-turned-property tycoon Babu Bodasing bought the farm. It stayed in the Bodasing family for many years, and they remain shareholders of Prince’s Grant Holdings today.Top-ranked courseThe course at Prince’s Grant is consistently listed in South Africa’s top 20 in the annual ranking conducted by Golf Digest magazine – no mean feat, given the many world-renowned courses located across the country. It also hosts the annual National Amateur Championship, the SAA Pro-Am as well as other local PGA events.Designed by top South African course designer Peter Matkovich, Prince’s Grant was opened in 1994 and has grown into one of the country’s most prestigious coastal golf estates. It’s nestled on lush stretch of land along the northern coast of KwaZulu-Natal, about 75km or 45 minute’s drive north of Durban. Attractive holiday houses have been constructed on about half of the 460 residential stands, and many of these are available for rent by golfing parties and other visitors.The lodge at Prince’s Grant is a four star bed-and-breakfast facility with 15 rooms looking out over the course. As a holiday destination, Prince’s Grant also offers a pristine private beach, canoeing on the lagoon, health and beauty treatments, tennis and squash courts, swimming pools and conference facilities – but golf is without doubt the major drawcard.Gems of the Dolphin CoastPrince’s Grant is one of a handful of highly rated clubs on the Dolphin Coast of northern KwaZulu-Natal. These include the Tom Weiskopf-designed Zimbali Country Club, two courses at Mount Edgecombe, as well as Simbithi Country Club and Umhlali Golf Estate near Ballito.Clubhouse and lodge manager Dereck Hirson says that it is difficult to relate Prince’s Grant with these courses. On the one hand, they occasionally work together, combining their marketing capacity to bring golfers and other tourists to the area. After all, the Dolphin Coast is a little out of the way for many travellers. But, on the other hand, they are essentially competitors in a limited market. And golf tourism is as affected by local and global recessions as any other sector.In the roughThe course at Prince’s Grant is a challenge for scratch golfers, so it’s to be expected that high-handicappers, like myself, will find it tough going.Course management is key. At just under 6 000m off the club tees, it doesn’t require big drives, but it does demand accuracy. The rough can be unforgiving, and there are large tracts of out-of-bounds territory snug against the fairways. Take extra balls!It’s also wise to pay attention to the playful monikers given to each hole. For example, listen to the advice implicit in the nickname for the par-four 13th hole, which makes a dog-leg up a blind rise. It’s called “Stay Right”. I didn’t, and paid a heavy price. Fortunately, I was warned to keep calm on the first hole, “Temper Tantrum”, and managed to retain my composure even after I fluffed my drive right in front of the clubhouse.The 14th, “Windy”, is just that – but, to be fair, so is much of the course. Upcountry golfers should remember the golden rule when playing near the sea: take a lower club than you usually would, or you’ll end up short every time.Having said all this, perhaps the best counsel to follow is the old saying about not letting a round of golf become “a good walk spoiled”. The course offers unrivalled vistas over the ocean and surrounding fields. The signature 15th hole, for instance, drops dramatically from an elevated tee to a narrow fairway hundreds of feet below. When the views are this spectacular, you shouldn’t worry too much about your score.last_img read more

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#Nextchat: Creating Powerful Cultures

first_imgSo they built their culture around that, particularly in the way they make decisions. Although they have a fairly traditional, hierarchical structure (on paper anyway), the actual practice of decision-making is really very fluid, morphing and flexing depending on who has access to that critical information about the patients’ hopes, dreams, and aspirations. If a particular patient was very passionate about sailing before their injury, there is nothing holding back one of the healthcare providers from spending money to get that patient out on a lake to do their rehabilitation work. According to one employee, “There are no lines we can’t cross in terms of creativity and what we can do for our residents.”  How you run meetings internally, how you share information across departments, and how you do the basics of project management—these can all be low hanging fruit that you can address in order start clarifying and reinforcing a culture that drives your success. People need to see the changes happening in real ways for the new culture to take root. If you missed this chat you can read the RECAP with all the tweets here.  What a powerful culture looks likePowerful cultures have a clear understanding of what drives success. In the case of QLI, they have figured this out in a very tangible way. It’s a granular and focused understanding of what “makes or breaks” them. QLI provides rehabilitation to people with brain and spinal cord injuries. Their work is not just about providing adequate healthcare — it’s about rebuilding shattered lives.  by Maddie Grant In order to be successful, they have to connect their healthcare services very deeply to the patient’s life, accessing the patient’s hopes, dreams, and aspirations in the process. It’s the only way to get the rehabilitation to really stick. That deeper, meaningful connection is what drives their success. What’s a Twitter Chat? Three Tools for Twitter Chats Changing your organization’s cultureOnce you get clear on what drives your organization’s success, you’ll actually have to start changing how you do things internally so you can align your culture with the success factors and to make sure the processes you design end up rewarding people who behave in the ways that generate the most success. When you start to work on your culture, don’t settle for a positive-sounding list of core values that will look good as posters on the wall. If your core values are “customer focus”, “excellence and quality”, “innovation”, “collaboration” – I would argue that they are meaningless. Why? Because everyone else has those same core values. Instead, make a clear case that those posters you have about collaboration or respect actually connect deeply to what drives your success. Actually start building those ideas into your processes, both at the surface level and within your HR processes. Please join @shrmnextchat at 3 p.m. ET on January 18 for #Nextchat with special guest, Founding Partner of WorkXO, Maddie Grant (@maddiegrant). We’ll chat about what it takes to create a powerful culture in your organization. From there, organizations doing this kind of thinking about culture almost always start to focus on deeper changes related to human resources—hiring, onboarding, firing, and performance management. Look at the famous culture “cool kid” in the business world, Zappos. They have infused their success factors into their hiring processes to ensure a culture of “WOW” customer service.  When the connection is clear, the employees will see it and behave accordingly, because deep down everyone wants to be successful. You’ll get that employee engagement you’ve been looking for while shoring up the bottom line in the process. Now THAT is a best place to work.  Q1. What are the outward signs of a powerful company culture?Q2. What leadership behaviors drive positive and powerful cultures within organizations? Q3. Organizations should design their culture around what drives their success. True or false? — and why?Q4. What are the keys to creating vision and mission statements that will help ensure a powerful workplace culture?Q5. How should employees be involved, and how can they be empowered, to create more powerful workplace cultures?Q6. What is HR’s role in creating powerful workplace cultures? Q7. As an HR professional, what inhibits your ability to create a more powerful culture in your workplace?Q8. What is your advice for senior leaders at organizations with broken cultures for creating more powerful cultures?  So while a lot of organizations may spend time trying to find the right balance of happy hours or break-room perks to try to bolster their culture and employee engagement scores, the companies that have the truly strong cultures—that run circles around their competition—actually take a different approach. They directly connect their culture to what drives their success and design their culture around that.  How do you help your staff connect culture to what drives the success of the enterprise? Quality Living, Inc. (QLI) is a healthcare company in Omaha, Nebraska that has come in first in their local “best place to work” award so many times, they’ve been effectively taken out of the competition and put in their own category in order to give some other deserving companies a shot at the top spot of recognition. How do they do it? Not through happy hours or foosball in the break rooms. They do it by being crystal clear on what drives the success of their enterprise. Company culture is not about being cool or even being a “best place to work.” It’s about being more successful. Period.last_img read more

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Interview and Interrogation Training: Identifying Operational Issues

first_imgThis week’s International Association of Interviewers interview and interrogation training tip provided by Wicklander-Zulawski, has Dave Thompson, CFI discussing identifying operational issues or loopholes in the system that can be found during the interview.Often during our seminars or during training we talk about the importance of substantiating the confession, which involves the who, what, when, where and why for all confessions obtained. But one of the most important things to understand, especially in the retail or business environment, is to figure out what operational concerns existed that created the opportunity for the subject to get away with something in the first place.If we just continue to conduct interviews, or if we just continue to eliminate or terminate employees who have done the same thing over and over again, we’re really not fixing the root cause. The best way to reduce shrink and increase morale is to fix the root cause and figure out which operational concerns are giving the employees the opportunity to do wrong in the first place.- Sponsor – A great interviewer will not only obtain the confession, but identify the “how.” Being able to figure out how they got away with it and make a global change or impact in the organization really shows return on investment for being such a great interviewer.Every loss prevention investigator should continuously strive to enhance their investigative interviewing skills as part of an ongoing commitment to best-in-class interviewing performance. This includes holding ourselves to an elite standard of interview and interrogation training that is ethical, moral and legal while demanding excellence in the pursuit of the truth. The International Association of Interviewers (IAI) and Wicklander-Zulawski (WZ) provide interview and interrogation training programs and additional guidance to investigators when dealing with dishonest employees, employee theft, sexual harassment, policy violations, building rapport, pre-employment interviewing, lying, denials and obtaining a statement.By focusing on the latest information and research from experts in the field as well as academia, legal and psychological resources, these video tips provide interview and interrogation training techniques that can enhance the skill sets of professionals with backgrounds in Law Enforcement, Loss Prevention, Security, Asset Protection, Human Resources, Auditors or anyone looking to obtain the truth.To learn more about interview and interrogation training and how you can further develop your professional skill sets, please visit www.w-z.com or www.certifiedinterviewer.com for additional information. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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How I Got My 64GB Nexus 6

first_imgTags:#Devices Stock Checker#Google#Google Alert#Google Play Store#Motorola#Nexus 6#NowInStock#Page Monitor Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Another Wednesday has come and gone. If you’re on a quest for the high-storage version of Google’s huge but elusive Nexus 6 smartphone—as I was not too long ago—that means another week may have already ended for you in disappointment.It doesn’t have to. Supply shortages have turned the search for a 64GB Nexus 6 into a crapshoot, but there are ways to improve your odds. One of them worked for me. Now they can work for you, too.Taking The Nexus StepThe Nexus 6—announced last October, though it didn’t start shipping until November—has been in short supply since its launch. The Motorola-manufactured phone drew major attention thanks to its huge 6-inch screen and its topline technical specs, both big departures for Google’s lineup of “pure Android” phones.But finding the Nexus 6, particularly the 64GB model ($700 unlocked), has long been a chore. Sure, a few early birds got their phones by pre-ordering them. And carriers eventually stocked up, although it took weeks—and, probably due to the shortages, none carry anything but the $650 32GB version. (Verizon still doesn’t even carry that, though it says it’s “coming soon.”)For Nexus 6 fans intent on maxing out their storage space, though, about the only option was to play the odds every Wednesday, when the Google Play Store released a limited supply of phones to anyone fortunate enough to be in the right place at the right time.When I’m 64GBIt might seem quaint, if not downright archaic, to get worked up about the available storage on your smartphone. We live in an age, after all, in which you can easily stream your music and video and store gigabytes of email, texts and photos in the cloud for free. For me, though, 64GB was non-negotiable, particularly in a phone like the Nexus 6, which lacks a removable micro SD card slot. There’s history here: My first Android phone, the HTC Evo 4G, started running out of storage space after about 18 months, forcing me first to unlock it and then root it, so I could rid it of carrier-installed crapware (thanks, Sprint!) and move some apps to the micro SD card.Settling for the 32GB Nexus 6 ($650) didn’t strike me as an attractive option, since you never know what’s going to fill up your phone storage a year or two down the line. And it’s not like you can upgrade your mobile storage capacity the way you can your laptop’s hard disk.Besides, doubling Nexus 6 storage would only set me back an extra $50, which seemed plenty cheap. The real expense, it turned out, involved time, effort and frustration—and those costs mounted up pretty quickly.Stalking The Wild Nexus 6This screen quickly became a close friendLike most people who haven’t thought things through carefully, I started off with a pretty scattershot approach. I set an early-morning reminder on my phone to start checking the Play Store every Wednesday morning, and would dutifully refresh the page throughout the day, sometimes for 4–5 minutes at a time. (I didn’t have the luxury of going full-on obsessive with it.)That didn’t work, and it got old fast. After a week or two, I went old-school and added a Google Alert to catch news or blog-post updates on Nexus 6 availability.The result: Lots of recycled articles from quasi-spammy sites; irrelevant posts on Motorola strategy, the Nexus 9 tablet or Nexus 6 how-tos; and the occasional hope-inspiring notice that the phone I was looking for had suddenly become available on either Google Play or the Motorola website. At one point, I was elated to see the 64GB listed on Amazon, only to find the shipping time was six to eight weeks, i.e., never.Sadly, even the real leads did no good; the stores were always sold out by the time I checked. It didn’t help that the volume of alerts was so high, I couldn’t keep up with them in real time. Sometimes following those links led to other seemingly promising sites; I ended up browsing Reddit and a variety of Android sites as often as I could manage. But none of it led me to the prize.I needed a better solution.Setting An App To Catch A PhoneAs it turned out, the failed Google Alerts experiment did in fact turn up exactly the lead I needed, although I didn’t realize it at the time. After seeing a Redditor or commenter mention some sort of availability-tracking app a few times, I eventually cottoned to the fact it was something I should probably look into.A few searches later, I zeroed in on an Android app with the unglamorous name Devices Stock Checker. Written by a French developer named Julien Vermet, the app regularly checks availability for devices sold in the Play Store—everything from the Google Chromecast to Chromebooks. That included, of course, Nexus phones.Devices Stock Checker isn’t the most polished app you’ll ever find. (I emailed Vermet to discuss it, but never heard back.) It’s infested with full-screen ads that pop up when you least expect them—my favorite was one that seemed to take over the phone when I opened the app’s settings—and it can suck up a not-inconsequential amount of battery power, depending on how you have it set up.But once you get it squared away, the app does exactly what you expect. I tested it out by checking for both the 32GB and 64GB Nexus 6. At 5am the next morning, it woke me with a loud alert and persistent buzzing to let me know the 32GB was in stock. Good for my confidence in the app, bad for my sleep.It was showtime.Pratfalls On A Digital StageI’d been on the hunt for more than a month and was heartily sick of false starts and bad leads, so I cranked Devices Stock Checker to the max. It promptly started pinging the Play Store once a minute, chewing battery life as it went. Just to be sure, I started it up on a Monday while I was thinking about it; I didn’t want to risk forgetting to activate it on Wednesday.Even with that precaution, there were still a few pratfalls in store.Come Wednesday, the app was disappointingly silent for much of the morning—at least until around 11am, when my phone went bezerk. I raced to the Play Store; sure enough, the 64GB was in stock. But two steps into the purchase process, something glitched. A window informed me that an “unknown error has occurred”—I’ll say—and my purchase suddenly vanished. Cue gnashing of teeth and rending of garments.But Devices Stock Checker wasn’t done. About 45 minutes later, it buzzed again. Unfortunately, I was in the middle of a business call and couldn’t check the Play Store. By the time I did, the 64GB was out of stock. It was clearly turning out not to be my day.Except that the app went off a third time a few minutes later. This time the purchase sailed through, and by the following Wednesday, I had a new phone.Victory!You Have Other OptionsIf you find yourself in a similar boat, Devices Stock Checker isn’t your only option. You can, for instance, install the Page Monitor extension in Chrome and set it to watch the Play Store (or Motorola site) for updates. When it finds them, it alerts you by displaying a notification on its badge in your browser.Other users swear by NowInStock.net, another Web-based service you can use to check the availability of a vast variety of products. Among the site’s interesting features is a detailed history of product availability. For instance, it reveals that the 64GB Nexus 6 has rarely been in stock for longer than 7–8 minutes at a time, and sometimes for as little as a minute.Of course, these options have their own drawbacks. Page Monitor, for instance, only works on a desktop—mobile Chrome doesn’t support extensions—and you have to watch its icon to see the notification.NowInStock, by contrast, offers text, browser and email alerts, which sound useful enough. But I couldn’t be sure it’s actually catching every window for the 64GB Nexus 6. I looked back at the day I ordered mine, and NowInStock only shows the midnight blue version available for one nine-minute period—and it wasn’t the one in which I snagged the phone. Still, three options are better than the none I started out with. If you’re still on the hunt for a 64GB Nexus 6, I’d recommend Devices Stock Checker mostly because, well, it worked for me. I also liked its mobile notification, which was prompt and pretty much impossible to miss when the phone was nearby.The upside to Page Monitor and NowInStock, by contrast, is that you can use them to monitor any number of products sold by a variety of merchants, not just a limited selection on Google Play. Whatever you choose, happy hunting.Lead photo by TechStage; cloud storage photo by mekuria getinet; screencap of Devices Stock Checker and other Nexus 6 photos by David Hamilton for ReadWritecenter_img david hamilton Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

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Wetlands scientists speak out against Trump’s move to undo water rule

first_img “As non-profit organizations, we support and foster sound science, education, restoration and management of wetlands and other aquatic resources,” the letter says, adding that the regulation was written “using the best available science.”Finalized by the Obama administration in May 2015, the Clean Water Rule, also known as the Waters of the U.S. rule, or WOTUS, caught the ire of farmers, land developers and energy companies.The law was stayed in a federal court following multiple legal challenges, including one brought by now-U.S. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt when he was Oklahoma attorney general.On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order directing EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to review and possibly rescind or replace the regulation (E&E News PM, Feb. 28).The letter from the societies accompanies an amicus brief they filed in the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to support a brief filed by the Obama administration defending the regulation earlier this year. That case has been stayed pending a Supreme Court review of whether it has jurisdiction over the regulation (Greenwire, Jan. 13).In their letter, the organizations describe the ecological importance of wetlands, which can remove otherwise harmful nutrient pollution from water, as well as the benefits wetlands provide to humans.”They store water, and thus are a source of water during times of drought,” the letter says. “Many wetlands soak up runoff and floodwaters, which reduces peak flood-flows and avoids costly flood damage.”Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2017. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net Originally published by E&E NewsSeven scientific societies are speaking out against President Donald Trump’s executive order targeting the contentious Clean Water Rule.Representing more than 200,000 members total, the Society of Wetland Scientists, Ecological Society of America, American Institute of Biological Scientists, American Fisheries Society, Society for Ecological Restoration, Society for Freshwater Science and Phycological Society of America wrote a letter to Trump arguing in favor of the regulation.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Randy von Liski/Flickr By Ariel Wittenberg, E&E NewsMar. 2, 2017 , 3:00 PM Read more… Some farmers are concerned about the impact that the Clean Water Act rule could have on their operations. Wetlands scientists speak out against Trump’s move to undo water rulelast_img read more

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Messi’s brother involved in car crash in Argentina

first_imgLionel Messi Messi’s brother involved in car crash in Argentina 17:55 8/28/17 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Matias Messi choque Olé Lionel Messi Barcelona Deportivo Alavés v Barcelona Deportivo Alavés Primera División WTF Matias Messi was caught in a collision in Rosario, though thankfully there were so serious injuries Lionel Messi’s brother was involved in a car accident in Pueblo Esther, Rosario, in the early hours of Saturday morning, it has emerged.Matias collided with a heavy goods vehicle during bad weather, giving brother Lionel a scare before the latter took to the pitch for Barcelona against Alaves.Matias was unhurt in the ordeal, but the shocking images show the extent of the damage sustained by his black Audi. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! ‘I’m getting better’ – Can Man Utd flop Fred save his Old Trafford career? Why Barcelona god Messi will never be worshipped in the same way in Argentina Matias Messi choqueMatias Messi choqueMatias Messi choqueWith his brother walking away from the wreckage unscathed, Messi went on to score a second-half double to secure Barcelona’s second victory in two La Liga matches.last_img read more

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