Ceramic coated alloy brake rotors? Carbon backed brake pads? Oh yeah!

first_imgCeramic coated aluminum bicycle rims have been around for decades, offering higher friction and durability for improved braking performance. Then disc brakes took over, offering vastly superior performance. But what if you combined the two? That’s one of the trends we saw at Taipei Cycle Show, and here are two brands with a variety of clever disc brake upgrades…Above is the ceramic coated aluminum disc brake rotor from HSC (Huang Chieh Metal), which uses a bit of venting on the braking surface and an 8-arm structure to maximize stiffness. They use a MAO (Mico Arc Oxidation process to bond the ceramic material to the aluminum, which they developed to be able to offer these at a reasonable cost.But why do this? Aluminum is not only lighter than the typical steel rotor, it also dissipates heat better. But, it makes a lousy braking surface. Adding the ceramic coating gives it much more friction, increases its durability, and according to their testing reduces the amount of force you need to apply at the lever by about half to accomplish the same stopping distance in dry conditions. Wet weather performance is also supposedly better.HCM’s ceramic-alloy rotors come in at a claimed weight of 95g. We like the potential of this proven rim brake technology coming to rotors that are 2/3 or less the weight of a traditional steel rotor.HCM also makes multi-material rotors, sandwiching an aluminum core between stainless steel braking surfaces. This new version exposes more of the alloy inside the center, helping to cool it even faster. It’s similar to Shimano’s ICE rotor tech, but without the giant fins.Brakco Ceramic Rotors & Carbon PadsBrakco was another brand showing off ceramic alloy rotors, but with a few tweaks. Their rotors have a nice rounded edge that should keep the UCI happy, and a slotted design to shed crud. They’re also offering it with either a full 7075 alloy carrier or a combo carbon/alloy carrier. Claimed weights are as low as 49g (140mm) and 72g (160mm) for the alloy carrier, and drop even more for the carbon/alloy version…45g (140mm) and 68g (160mm)!Both Brakco and HCM rotors require special brake pads to work with these MAO rotors.Brakco also had these carbon fiber backed brake pads for the usual Shimano and SRAM calipers, with various pad materials on offer. The benefit? Much less heat transmission from pad to fluid. And bragging rights. Because carbon. The trick with these? They’re mostly an OEM manufacturer, so you’ll have to hope another brand picks these up. Or start importing them yourself and slap your own label on them.last_img read more

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Boost for IRONMAN Cork as Alistair Brownlee to make full-distance debut…

first_imgDouble-Olympic champion, Alistair Brownlee is set to make his much-anticipated long-distance outing at the inaugural IRONMAN Ireland, Cork, on 23 June. The British athlete has become one of the most recognisable faces in triathlon and the timing of his long-distance debut has been a hot topic since his 2016 Olympic triumph.He caused a stir when he moved up to the middle-distance, making his IRONMAN 70.3 debut at IRONMAN 70.3 St George in 2017. During that event, he put in a masterclass to beat names such as Lionel Sanders, Sebastian Kienle and Tim Don amongst others.Later that year, injury unfortunately kept him off the start line at the 2017 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship and delayed a possible long-distance debut. Although, he came back in formidable fashion by qualifying for the 2018 IRONMAN 70.3 World Championship in South Africa where he finished second in a race against Jan Frodeno and Javier Gomez.With the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona now in his sights, Alistair Brownlee has chosen Ireland and IRONMAN Cork, to be the starting point for his long-distance career. IRONMAN Cork, Ireland’s first ever IRONMAN race, is expected a number of athletes from around the world who will be travelling to experience racing in ‘Ireland’s Ancient East’.The introduction of Alistair Brownlee adds another layer of stardust to the inaugural event which will be the first European race of the season to be broadcast live on Facebook Watch via IRONMAN Now.“We already knew the eyes of the triathlon world would be on Cork this June, but with Alistair Brownlee choosing to make his IRONMAN debut here, viewers and local supporters will be in for a treat,” said John Wallnutt, IRONMAN Cork Race Director.“IRONMAN Cork was always going to be an historic event being Ireland’s first ever IRONMAN race. Now, it becomes the race where one of the greatest triathletes of our time takes the next step in his triathlon evolution. This is something we can’t wait to see.”Watch Alistair Brownlee take on his first ever long distance at IRONMAN Cork, as the event will be streamed live on Facebook Watch.www.ironman.com Relatedlast_img read more

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Cindy Holscher leads fundraising efforts for 2018 House election cycle in Shawnee Mission area; newcomer Matt Calcara outraises incumbent Randy Powell

first_imgRep. Cindy Holscher raised more than $30,000 in 2017, putting her ahead of all incumbents and challengers for the House in the area.First-term Democrat Cindy Holscher has proved to be an effective fundraiser according to campaign reports filed with the Kansas Governmental Ethics Commission Wednesday.Matt CalcaraHolscher, who defeated Republican incumbent Amanada Grosserode in the 2016 election to represent District 17, led all Shawnee Mission area incumbents and challengers in fundraising during calendar year 2017, bringing in $30,742 in contributions. The Lenexa representative has $29,444 cash on hand, according to her report.Holscher was followed by Republican incumbent Melissa Rooker of Fairway, who raised $23,455 in 2017. Rooker has far more money on hand than any other representative or candidate in the area with $85,798.First-term Democrat Brett Parker of District 29, which includes a portion of Overland Park within the 435 loop, was behind Rooker with $22,192 in money raised during 2017.Among the more notable results from the 2017 fundraising reports was the performance of Matt Calcara, a Democrat who is running for the District 30 seat held by Republican Randy Powell. Calcara has raised more than $14,000 since declaring his candidacy in May. That’s more than double the $6,100 in contributions Powell garnered for 2017. Calcara has more than $13,000 cash on hand compared to just under $8,000 for Powell.Calcara, 36, is a 1999 graduate of Shawnee Mission East who would be the first openly gay member of the legislature in Kansas history if elected.“I have been just blown away by the amount of community support we’ve been receiving,” Calcara said. “I’m just incredibly grateful to all of the people who’ve taken the time to give. Whether it’s $5 or $500, the people really are powering our campaign.”Fundraising totals for the Shawnee Mission area House districts are below:District 16Democrat Cindy Holscher (incumbent): $30,742 in contributions, $29,444 cash on handDistrict 17Democrat Laura Smith-Everett: $1,938 in contributions, $1,457 cash on handRepublican Tom Cox (incumbent): $14,474 in contributions, $17,748 cash on handDistrict 18Democrat Cindy Neighbor (incumbent): $12,790 in contributions, $11,141 cash on handDistrict 19Republican Stephanie Clayton (incumbent): $6,905 in contributions, $55,328 cash on handDemocrat Stephen Wyatt: $50 in contributions, $50 cash on handDistrict 20Republican Jan Kessinger (incumbent): $11,815 in contributions, $8,778 cash on handDistrict 21Democrat Jerry Stogsdill (incumbent): $11,787 in contributions, $10,823 cash on handDistrict 22Democrat Nancy Lusk (incumbent): $13,997 in contributions, $32,976 cash on handDistrict 23Republican Linda Gallagher: Did not file reportDistrict 24Democrat Jarrod Ousley (incumbent): $11,582 in contributions, $12,638 cash on handDistrict 25Republican Melissa Rooker (incumbent): $23,455 in contributions, $85,798 cash on handDistrict 29Democrat Brett Parker (incumbent): $22,192 in contributions, $21,096 cash on handDistrict 30Democrat Matt Calcara: $14,231 in contributions, $13,185 cash on handRepublican Randy Powell: $6,100 in contributions, $7,978 cash on handRep. Melissa Rooker leads all area House members with more than $85,000 cash on hand.last_img read more

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5 Questions with David Danto for LAVNCH WEEK 2.0

first_imgDavid Danto is the director of emerging technology for the IMCCA, or The Interactive Multimedia and Collaborative Communications Alliance. David will be a speaker on UCC Day of LAVNCH WEEK 2.0 for our cleverly coined “LAVNCH & Learn.” I was excited to hear what he was planning to talk about (hint: how does UC&C drive adapting to permanent societal change?) for LAVNCH WEEK 2.0. So I asked him five questions to get a preview together for our readers. Here are his answers.This is an interview with David Danto, as written by Leah McCann. It has been edited for clarity. LM: David, I’d love to hear more about your background (of an impressive four decades!) in AV and your experience as the director of emerging technology for nonprofit IMCCA. Can you tell me a bit about the IMCCA and how you got involved?DD: I began my career in the broadcasting space — as the director of engineering for Financial News Network (the precursor to CNBC) — and also built all of Bloomberg’s TV and radio facilities. In between those two, I created and ran NYU’s TV & Media Services department.  After Y2K, I transitioned to enterprise multimedia, running global technology teams for Morgan Stanley, Lehman Brothers and JPMorgan Chase. After about 30 years in an end-user seat, I transitioned to the “sell” side of the industry as a consultant and analyst covering technology and collaboration. I moved on to my current role at Poly (director of UC strategy & research) a little more than a year ago. Throughout my career, I’ve always felt it important to give back to the industry, and I have been the IMCCA’s director of emerging technology for more than a decade. I believe we must provide expert, agnostic education to users of our technology so that the industry can grow and thrive. I’ve also been honored to serve as a presenter and/or judge for many technology associations (including NAB, InfoComm, CES and others). My broad experiences in broadcasting, film, theater, academia, business, enterprise technology and consulting have given me a fantastic perspective on where our industry has been and where it’s going.LM: Impressive! So what will you be speaking about on UCC Day of LAVNCH WEEK 2.0?DD: As our society begins to emerge from a horrific global pandemic, many AV and collaboration entities have been focusing on what we experienced (that remote working using UC&C tools works) and what we’re preparing for as we return to offices (caution, distancing, etc.). Those are important facets, but they miss the bigger picture. I, and a handful of others, have been advocating for remote working and smarter working for knowledge workers for years. Now that a huge majority of people were forced to experience that model, the genie is out of the bottle. We are living through a significant inflection in culture change that many do not realize. Our concepts of cities, offices, homes, education, entertainment, dining and more — supported by collaboration tools — will permanently change. My presentation will point out and describe these trends in a big-picture sense. Most organizations are focused on “the new normal” of how we’ll return to work while there is no effective treatment nor vaccine for COVID-19. What we really need to be focusing on for the future is “The Next Normal,” describing the period after there is a treatment/vaccine. What changes will be permanently sticking around.LM: As the audience of UCC Day will largely be AV integrators (along with EdTech managers and some end users), what do you want this group to take away after you speak?DD: It is difficult to realize significant cultural changes during a period when they are happening. Perhaps, when one looks back at this time period in five or so years, the shift will be more obvious. My goal in this presentation is to help people see the critical changes happening in real-time so that they can be at the forefront of the new models required for organizations to survive and thrive. Collaboration tools — now widespread and reliable — combined with ubiquitous high-speed internet connectivity will be the backbone to support society’s ability to adapt to these changes. Understanding what is and will continue to be important with our technologies and services will give viewers of this presentation an edge in their future activities.LM: That resonates — I do think we’ve been in reaction mode to this point, which is understandable. So, keeping in mind all this is still relatively recent … has the AV industry, in your opinion, done a good enough job shifting its approach as the novel coronavirus has forced us to pivot? If yes, what are some of the good things that have come out of it? If not, how can AV integrators and tech managers pivot better?DD: Please don’t make me drag out a soapbox and start preaching about our industry. ;~) I’m on record more times than even I care to be — discussing how poorly the AV industry has historically pivoted to the future. Most organizations didn’t see the current situation coming and didn’t prepare for it, and our industry’s “leadership” is squarely at fault. We’ve allowed ourselves to be seduced by a message we wanted to hear about our “fantastic experiences” as opposed to the messages we truly needed to hear about preparing for the future. As a result, most AV companies sat out the pandemic on the sidelines with no business — specifically at a time when we could have been our society’s champions supporting UC&C, remote collaboration and other specialties. We went for “sexy and fun” instead of a focus on “technology and IT.” It was a poor choice that I’ve compared to the fable of the Ant and the Grasshopper in my blog here. It’s long past time to evolve our industry to a technology- and science-based discipline, with a few “wow experiences” sprinkled in on the side in only the few circumstances where they are warranted. Most of us should never really be a “wow.” We’ll have successful businesses when we come through for our clients with solid, reliable, invisible technology choices that are only, truly realized by them in retrospect.LM: So, based on what you said earlier, I take it that you don’t agree with the term “New Normal” as people talk about the new way we now operate with UCC technology? Is there a term you would use to describe this point in time instead (if there is one)?DD: Many analysts and technologists have identified multiple phases of the pandemic and our exit past it. I don’t dispute any of them, but my focus has been on two specific phases post the shelter-in-place orders. As I mentioned above, I use “the new normal” to describe the period we’re in now — tentatively returning to work while there is no effective treatment nor vaccine for COVID-19 — and “the next normal” to describe the period after there is a treatment/vaccine. The first phase will be focused on caution, fear and safety — all the things surrounding our desire not to get sick from our actions. Huddle rooms and hot-desking/hoteling are a couple of examples of things not appropriate now, because we need to distance ourselves from others and we don’t want to share anything that might put our lives at risk. The second phase won’t be about caution but, rather, choice — where and how knowledge workers will choose to work and live now that remote working is a proven method with collaboration tools and broadband connectivity as the backbone to support this freedom.Don’t miss David Danto at LAVNCH WEEK 2.0 on Monday, June 22; his LAVNCH & Learn session on UCC Day will offer a full version of the topics we discussed today. Register here, and visit rave.pub/LAVNCHweek2 to learn all about LAVNCH WEEK.last_img read more

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Fight off cyber and DDoS attacks

first_imgRegulators expect institutions to take steps to address security threats.The Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) agencies issued joint statements in April to notify financial institutions of the risks associated with cyber-attacks on ATM and card authorization systems, and the continued distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks on public websites.The statements describe steps the regulators expect institutions to take to address these attacks and highlight resources they can use to help mitigate the risks posed by such attacks.‘Unlimited Operations’The agencies warned institutions of a type of ATM cash-out fraud the U.S. Secret Service characterizes as “Unlimited Operations.”The is a category of ATM cash-out fraud where criminals withdraw funds beyond the cash balance in consumers’ accounts or beyond other control limits typically applied to ATM withdrawals.Criminals perpetrate the fraud by initiating cyberattacks to gain access to Web-based ATM control panels, which enables them to withdraw funds from ATMs using stolen debit, prepaid, or ATM card account information. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Errata

first_img March 15, 2007 Errata Errata Errata A story in the February 15 News headlined “Pro bono in decline” should have said Florida lawyers reported on their Bar membership fee forms providing 1.3 million hours of pro bono work for the poor in 2005, down from 1.45 million in 2004 and donated $3.4 million to legal aid programs in 2005, down from $3.7 million in 2004.last_img

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Stewardship / Resistance Scan for Jun 30, 2017

first_imgEarly education boosts students’ antibiotic savvy, study findsA hands-on educational program dramatically increased primary school students’ knowledge of antibiotic action and use, according to a study yesterday in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents.The program involved scientific workshops at 26 primary schools in Turin, Italy, led by public health experts for more than 1,200 children aged 9 to 11 years. The project involved hands-on experiments, microscope observation, quizzes, interactive games, and team competitions. Course topics were: (1) introduction to microbes, (2) infection spread, (3) the immune system, (4) infection treatment, and (5) infection prevention. It was implemented for three school years from 2011 to 2015.Students’ responses on both antibiotic action and use improved significantly pre- and post-education. Before the program, only 5.0% of 956 students correctly agreed that antibiotics are effective against bacteria, while afterward the number rose to 77.2%. And before the program 75.8% incorrectly thought the drugs were effective against bacteria and viruses, and 19.1% incorrectly thought they were effective against all microorganisms. After the program those rates dropped to 12.8% and 10.0%, respectively.Regarding antibiotic use, the percentage of students who correctly agreed with, “The unnecessary use of antibiotics can increase the resistance of bacteria to them” rose from 12.1% to 73.6% pre- and post-program, respectively. And those who incorrectly agreed with, “The use of antibiotics can speed up the recovery of cold, cough, and flu” dropped from 87.9% to 26.4%.The authors conclude, “Although it is difficult to determine the true success of this project, due to the lack of data on long-term retention of knowledge and real behavior changes of students after being taught, data gathered support the idea that early childhood microbial literacy through a hands-on approach should contribute to engage students with scientific subjects and health-related issues.”Jun 29 Int J Antimicrob Agents study Portuguese researchers report MCR-1 in ICU patientResearchers in Portugal describe the detection of the colistin-resistance MCR-1 gene in Escherichia coli isolates from a patient who had been treated with meropenem and colistin, according to a report today in Emerging Infectious Diseases.The patient, a 70-year-old woman, was admitted to intensive care last July for abdominal pain and received meropenem, fluconazole, and linezolid after emergency surgery for an abdominal occlusion. After 50 days of antibiotics, a urine specimen tested positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae, and further testing showed resistance to carbapenems but susceptibility to colistin and tigecycline, so she was prescribed colistin and tigecycline for 6 days, after which urine cultures were negative for K pneumoniae.Six weeks later, however, E coli were isolated that showed a resistance profile identical to that of the previous K pneumoniae isolate but also expressing colistin resistance. In addition to the MCR-1 gene, the investigators confirmed the presence of the blaKPC-3 gene and other resistance genes.The authors conclude, “Colistin-resistant [E coli] may have been part of the patient’s gut microbiome, acquiring the blaKPC-3-encoding plasmid from the [K pneumoniae] strain. Although neutropenic, the patient’s samples showed an asymptomatic bacteriuria. Thus, prophylactic administration of antibacterial drugs was likely avoidable.”Jun 30 Emerg Infect Dis reportlast_img read more

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Driven Crazy By Citiot Drivers

first_imgThe Murphy who inspired Murphy’s Law — where if something can go wrong, it will — was a licensed driver.Actually, he was Air Force Capt. Edward Murphy, who coined the phrase at Edwards Air Force Base in California in 1949, working as an engineer on Air Force Project MX981, testing to see how much sudden deceleration a person can stand in a crash —an experiment city drivers update every Friday night in the Hamptons.So, if driving these days is driving you nuts, don’t feel special. In Ohio in 1895, it has been reported, there were just two gasoline operated automobiles in the entire state. And they collided.One of the drivers must have been named Murphy. I would not be surprised if the other motorist was named Hamill.Whether the Ohio story is true or apocryphal, I was thinking about it and Murphy recently as I sat behind the wheel on Montauk Highway driving from East Hampton to Bridgehampton, inching toward a DWI checkpoint. Even though I haven’t had a sip of alcohol since 1991, I got nervous.Because when I’m driving, Murphy’s Law applies and something always seems to go wrong.Do I have a dead taillight?Will the cops spot that Tylenol I dropped on the floor while driving out from the city and lock me up until the lab can confirm, after a weekend in lockup, that it’s only a Tylenol?What if it’s a potassium cyanide poisoned Tylenol, like the ones that killed seven people in Chicago in 1982?Will they try to pin those old unsolved murders on me? Or take me for a Russian agent looking to bump off opponents of pro-Trump Congressman Lee Zeldin?Are you allowed to operate a motor vehicle on amoxicillin and Tylenol, which I was taking for an infected throat?Will the Chicken Marsala I had for lunch ignite the breathalyzer?If the cop asks me to walk a straight line, will I be so nervous that I look like the scarecrow pratfalling toward the Wizard of Oz and I wind up in a beige jailhouse jumper in front of no-nonsense Justice Steven Tekulsky at the East Hampton Town Justice Court, having my license suspended and remanded on a mistaken ICE warrant hold?“But I’m only taking antibiotics and Tylenol for a bad throat, your honor,” I imagine myself pleading.“Sure, and you were only slugging the Marsala for that chest cough,” I conjure Tekulsky saying, his face like a brick in the Riverhead lockup where he has me frog-marched in chains.At the DWI stop, a very polite town cops asks, “How are you, sir?”“F-f-fine,” I say, like Stuttering John from the old Howard Stern show.“Anything to drink this evening?”“N-n-not since October 9, 1991.”I realize this is probably before he was born.“Ninety-one,” he says, smiling. “Okay, have a nice evening, sir.”I was discussing the horrors of driving with an East End native recently and she laughed because I’m a Brooklyn born subway “straphanger” who didn’t even learn to drive until I was 26, when I moved to Los Angeles to write a newspaper column.My astounded editor’s first assignment: “Go to driving school.”After I got my license, I rented an apartment in Santa Monica, where my landlord looked like a human rock-climbing wall. His name was Arnold Schwarzenegger whose idea of evening humor was to walk to the carport in the rear of his apartment complex, light a big cigar, and watch me adding new dents to my leased Ford Mustang by crashing into the support columns. When I left my headlights on all night and the car wouldn’t start, I rang Arnold’s bell.“Arnold, my car won’t start, think you can carry it down to the gas station for a jump?”We had good laughs about my driving prowess and him insisting to me that he was going to be a “moofie stah.” To which I would say, “Not with that accent and that name.”Guess who had the last laugh?Anyway, after I finished my driving history with my East End native friend she laughed and said, “Okay, so, the East End locals know in the winter driving is scary because you gotta watch out for deer popping out unexpectedly. During the summer, it’s the ‘cities,’ aka ‘citiots,’ doing unexpected things like just stopping dead in the middle of the road to take a cell phone call. Or trying to fit their enormous Range Rovers into the ‘small space lot’ in East Hampton Village.”She says a native friend was walking out of Stop & Shop on a recent morning and sensed a scary presence behind her. “She turned and it was a big Mercedes driving on the sidewalk! Right behind her! The motorist didn’t want to wait behind the person at the parking ticket station, so he created another lane that was half road/half sidewalk.”That’s why natives call ‘em “citiots.”She says it used to be if locals saw a black Range Rover, they’d think it was citiot trouble. “Before that, you’d give a Mercedes sedan plenty of room,” she says. “The latest citiot car to watch for is the Mini Cooper. See one of them and you can be pretty sure the citiot driver’s gonna do something crazy.”Her theory from a lifetime of defensive driving is that the summers here attract entitled out-of-towners who only drive when they’re in the Hamptons.“So they have no skills or experience,” she says. “But also, many just don’t care.”Some of her other favorite citiot observations include: Out-of-town 18-wheelers with drivers who don’t know how tall their trucks are, hitting the North Main Street trestle and peeling their truck tops off like sardine cans; meek traffic control officers dressed in black polyester in sweltering August, hiding behind parked cars because they can’t take one more obnoxious city driver yelling at them, or almost running them over; an entire Facebook group formed out of traffic/driving complaints called “Douchebags of the Hamptons,” riddled with photos of mostly “cities” parking in two or three spots, or illegally in handicapped spots.“One of my favorite is the citiot double-parking directly in front of the store you want to visit, even though there’s an empty space three cars up,” says the driven nuts East End native.My favorite of her stories involved a friend of hers who went to leave a busy village parking lot one day when two citiot drivers converged, honking at each other and facing off for his spot. “They were playing chicken and had inched so close, he couldn’t get out of the spot that they wanted to get into. So, he pulls back in, puts the car in park, climbs out, and takes his bike out of the back of his truck and cycles home.”Like the two sole motorists who crashed into each other in Ohio in 1895 and the man who in 1949 at Edwards Air Force Base said, “If something can go wrong, it will,” my guess is that at least one of those two citiot drivers had to be named Murphy.Good chance the other one’s name was Hamill . . . Sharelast_img read more

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A Haven For Digital Storytelling

first_imgAn eight-year-old guest interacts with DIMONscape of Havens House.The Shelter Island Historical Society has been eagerly working to expand its center for the past four years, with a newly renovated Havens House. Now, it has teamed up with visual arts creator, Roz Dimon, to install a permanent digital piece. It’s a juxtaposition of storytelling, where historic wheels, beams, and artifacts meet a new age of artistic narrative through DIMONscape of Havens House.How did you get involved with the Shelter Island Historical Society?They heard about the work I was doing in digital media. I had invented a new kind of storytelling process. Executive director Nanette Lawrenson worked with the board and they approved commissioning me to do a piece after I showed them a few other DIMONscapes I had done. I applaud them, because they took a leap into the unknown. It is a new kind of art. You look up, and right above you are the beams from the 1700s. So, it’s interesting. It’s permanently installed; anybody can go in.Describe the piece.It’s 36 inches high by 48 inches wide. It’s called DIMONscape of Havens House. It has a bronze plaque dedicated to Phyllis Wallace, who worked for the historical society as its archivist. And it was a surprise for her. So, it’s a great way to commemorate someone. It also has a QR code in the bronze plaque, and you can go off with your phone or any digital device.How did you wind up in this field of artwork?Accidentally. I started as a painter. I was living in New York City and in the 1980s, my paintings began to fill up with squares and pixels before I even knew what a pixel was. That really threw a curveball into my painting career. I took the earliest courses in digital art at the School of Visual Arts, and have been in digital media ever since . . . painting with it. I also do other works on oil and other things. But that’s been my primary medium.What’s your process?I make the art in the computer with a digital brush and digital canvas, which has been very sophisticated. My graduate school was the World Trade Center, where I headed up these new media teams, and I learned a lot about doing business and corporate design, and I really enjoyed that. I like to bring all that together when I work with a someone who positions a DIMONscape. It’s a business process, and it’s artwork. I like to invite everyone into a piece, so they aren’t intimidated by a contemporary work of art. It’s been fun to watch.Aside from Havens House, where can we find another piece?I have a DIMONscape that had been acquired by the National 9/11 Memorial Museum in Manhattan. It’s part of its permanent collection. It’s four-foot high by three-foot wide — a piece about finding hope, when all is lost. You can take any smart device and click on the label beside the painting. It’s still, but it’s a digital collage. You can go inside the painting as it’s being built. There’s a voiceover and it’s almost like you’re like the artists making the art. You go deep inside the layers of the piece.How has the next generation responded to you?I’m meeting a lot of young people through those interested in digital because I’m really dealing in the space. You’re going deep in a painting. It has a story that’s analog. That’s one of my mission statements, to bring people into my art and have a different relationship with the viewer, but while still being a serious work of art.What mark on the art world are you hoping to make?It’s a serious work of art to be contemplated, but it’s also a website. It’s a very different kind of website that actually goes with a painting so you can learn history. We’re overwhelmed by imagery. Everybody has to compete with iPhones. I think young people will be using this. I think I’m part of something that’s growing. A painting of a painting of a painting. I think it’s in a sort of Renaissance. Digital media is where it’s at.See more of Roz Dimon’s work at www.rozdimon.com and visit the Shelter Island Historical Society at 16 South Ferry Road on Shelter Island. Its website is www.shelterislandhistorical.org.nicole@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Air Products launches Freshline QuickChill Injector

first_imgSource: Air ProductsAir Products operates a state-of-the-art food lab in Allentown, Pennsylvania, where it can test a customer’s product on production-scale equipment to help determine the feasibility of using cryogenics in their process, quantify the cost versus benefits of using cryogenics, and optimise their food processing operation.Read more like this – subscribe todayEnjoyed this story? Subscribe to gasworld today and take advantage of even more great insights and exclusives in industrial gases.Visit www.gasworld.com/subscribe to access all content and choose the right subscription for you. The QuickChill Injector allows food manufacturers to chill sauces and liquids in minutes through the rapid cooling power of liquid nitrogen whilst complying with USDA cooling guidelines that require cooked liquid products to be chilled to 4°C (40°F) within five to six hours.The unit comes in a standard model that can be fitted to a variety of new or existing kettles and vessels, eliminating the need to invest in additional kettles, equipment or floor space.With optional Air Products Process Intelligence technology, food manufacturers can monitor, control and track injector operation through a temperature sensor and IIoT-enabled communication technology.last_img read more

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