James Bias

first_imgJames Bias earned his wings Saturday, July 6, 2013 at 6:20 p.m. surrounded by his family. A native of Branch, Louisiana, he moved to Beaumont, TX and later became a resident of Port Arthur, TX. He was a cement finisher, contractor, and proud owner of Po Boys Construction. He was a member of St. James Catholic Church.    A visitation is scheduled for Saturday, July 13, 2013 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel. Mass of Celebration will be held at 11 a.m. at St. James Catholic Church with Father James Coon officiating. Burial will follow in Live Oak Cemetery under the direction of Gabriel Funeral Home.   He was preceded in death by his parents James Bias Sr. and Lorena Pickney; first wife Viola Bias, brother Marshall Bias, sisters Irene Martin and Laura Ward, and son Michael James Guidry.   He is survived by his loving and devoted wife Wilma S. Bias; three daughters Evangelist Laura Bias, Debra Guidry, and Paula Anderson; and son Lee Guidry; three sisters Mary Melvo, Rose and Sharon Bias; one brother Joseph Guidry; 18 grandchildren, 28 great grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives, and friends.last_img read more

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February 1, 2011 News and Notes

first_imgNews and Notes Douglas A. Cherry of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Sarasota spoke on “How to Make Intellectual Property and Copyright Law Work for You” at a AAF Suncoast and EDC of Sarasota County seminar. Erskine C. Rogers III of Rutherford Mulhall in Palm Beach Gardens has been elected vice chair of the board of directors of the Drug Abuse Treatment Association. Timothy C. Garding of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa has been elected to the board of directors of the Tampa Bay Businesses for Culture and the Arts. William D. Keith of Cardillo, Keith & Bonaquist in Naples was inducted as a fellow in the Litigation Counsel of America at the society’s fall conference in Naples. Robert A. Caplen, a law clerk with the United States Court of Federal Claims in Washington, D.C., published his first book, Shaken & Stirred: The Feminism of James Bond. His new article, “Turning Esch to Dust?: The State of Supplementation of the Administrative Record in Bid Protests Before the Court of Federal Claims,” is forthcoming in the Whittier Law Review.   Glen J. Torcivia of The Law Office of Glen J. Torcivia and Associates in West Palm Beach has been appointed to the board of directors of Pine Jog Environmental Education Center. C. Graham Carothers, Jr., of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa has been elected to the board of directors for Voice Foundation. Warren R. Trazenfeld of Warren R. Trazenfeld, P.A., Miami, delivered a speech at the University of Miami’s Institute on Real Property titled “Ethics and Professional Responsibility: Why Did This Happen To Me? Causes of Action and Defenses in The World of Real Estate Attorney Malpractice.” Ken Mann of ADR & Law Office of Kenneth L. Mann in Scottsdale, Arizona, has been admitted to the mediation and arbitration panels of FINRA, the securities industry’s independent regulator, and is among the inaugural group of volunteer attorneys appointed by the Arizona Supreme Court’s chief justice to its Attorney Discipline Hearing Panels under Arizona’s revamped disciplinary system. Don Slesnick, the mayor of Coral Gables, has been appointed to serve on the ABA’s Commission on Civic Education in the Nation’s Schools. Mary Li Creasy of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa has been elected to the board of directors for Brookwood of Florida, Inc. Mitchell A. Dinkin of Buckingham, Doolittle & Burroughs in Boca Raton has been elected to the Florida Creditor’s Bar Association Board of Directors. Michael Cavendish of Gunster in Jacksonville has been elected chair of the Jacksonville Transportation Authority. Lewis W. Fishman of Lewis W. Fishman, P.A., in Miami has been elected president of the Florida Academy of Healthcare Attorneys. Nancy P. Campiglia of Keating & Schlitt in Orlando was recognized by the Osceola County Association of Realtors in her capacity as the program chair of the Central Florida Real Estate Council. Campiglia coordinated the first Lawyer/Realtor Law Symposium for the association, bringing Realtors and lawyers together to promote education and professionalism. Jason Ward Johnson of Lowndes Drosdick, Doster, Kantor & Reed in Orlando has been elected as president of the Tiger Bay Club of Central Florida. Leslie A. Share of Packman, Neuwahi & Rosenberg in Coral Gables presented “U.S. Tax Considerations in Offshore Planning” at the Southpac Offshore Planning Institute at Paradise Island, Bahamas, and “Effective Tax Strategies in Asset Protection” as a teleconference for the National Business Institute. Greg Coleman of Burman, Critton, Luttier & Coleman of West Palm Beach has been appointed to the Stetson University College of Law Board of Overseers. George Barford of Carlton Fields in St. Petersburg was appointed to the Credentials Committee (11th Circuit) of The College of Labor and Employment Lawyers. Sean Espenship of Jacksonville Beach has released Casino’s Gamble. Set amidst the college town of Gainesville, a fatherless and psychologically tormented law student from the street of hard-knocks unwittingly embarks upon a nine-month journey in search of a higher meaning to life. To purchase the book visit www.seanespenship.com.  Susan F. Clark of Radey Thomas Yon & Clark in Tallahassee gave a presentation in Washington, D.C., at a seminar entitled “Utility Rate Cases 2010,” sponsored by SNL Energy. Janet Martinez of Janet E. Martinez, P.A., in DeLand has been elected to the board of directors of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Metro Orlando. Cesar Sastre, general counsel of Bass Underwriters in Plantation, was elected to membership in the Federation of Defense & Corporate Counsel, an international organization to further the principles of knowledge, justice and fellowship. Joseph H. Serota of Weiss Serota Helfman Pastoriza Cole & Boniske has become president-elect of Temple Bet Shira in Pinecrest. Juliet Murphy Roulhac, of the Office of the General Counsel of Florida Power & Light, served on a panel discussing “Winning Strategies for Defense Counsel at Mediation” at the Florida Defense Lawyers Association/Florida Academy of Professional Mediators’ Annual Mediation and ADR Seminar in Orlando. Paul Levine of Los Angeles has published the legal thriller Illegal, from Bantam. The novel tells the story of Los Angeles lawyer Jimmy (“Royal”) Payne, who tries to help an undocumented Mexican boy and becomes enmeshed in a human trafficking scheme. Quentin E. Morgan of Brinkley Morgan in Ft. Lauderdale has been re-appointed to the Broward County Parks and Recreation Advisory Board. Kacy Donlon of Wiand Guerra King in Tampa was honored with the George C. Carr Memorial Award by the Tampa Bay Chapter of the Federal Bar Association.  Leonard E. Mondschein of The Elder Law Center of Mondschein and Mondschein in Miami presented “Medicaid Update,” at the “13th Annual Elder Law Update,” for the Palm Beach County Bar. Benjamin W. “Ben” Newman of GrayRobinson in Orlano has been re-appointed as a member of the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office Civil Service Board. Sen. Maria Sachs, D-Delray Beach, hosted Education: Forward!, a summit on the future of education in Florida at Lynn University. Sabrina M. Segal of Washington, D.C., won the 2010 Federal Bar Association’s Younger Federal Lawyer Award and the 2010 inaugural Federal News Radio Causey Award for efforts in the human capital management field. She also spoke at the U.S. Office of Government Ethics National Ethics Conference on using new media to increase the effectiveness of government ethics training and overall knowledge management among lawyers. Nicole C. Morris of Morris & O’Malley in West Palm Beach has been appointed president of the Palm Beach Chapter of the Nova Law Alumni Association. Robert M. Karton of Robert M. Karton, Ltd., in Chicago has been assigned to serve as the new Great Lakes Region commander of the Civil Air Patrol. Lisa Marie Macci of Boca Raton moderated Americans Against Hate’s Florida Pro-Israel Conference in Ft. Lauderdale, which honored Congressman Allen West with its “Protector of Zion” Award. The event, featuring nationally known speakers on Israel and counter-terrorism, was televised on C-Span. Frederick W. Leonhardt of GrayRobinson in Orlando has been appointed to the Florida Technology, Research and Scholarship Board by Gov. Charlie Crist. Thomas A. Dye of Carlton Fields in West Palm Beach was appointed to a three-year term on the board of directors of the Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches. Steven J. Wernick of Bilzin Sumberg Baena Price & Axelrod in Miami was elected vice president of Habitat for Humanity’s Habitat Young Professionals Group. E. John Wagner II, Michael J. Wilson, and Rose-Anne B. Frano of Williams Parker in Sarasota presented at the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Gulf Coast Chapter, meeting in January. Wagner also spoke on a panel at the ABA Tax Section meeting in January addressing common problems, planning opportunities and pitfalls regarding the billions of dollars of outstanding installment obligations that taxpayers currently possess. Keith J. Hesse of Carlton Fields in Orlando was elected to the board of directors of the Manufacturers Association of Central Florida. Robert A. Goldman of Fox, Wackeen, Dungey et.al. in Stuart taught The Institute for Paralegal Education’s webinar on “The Paralegal’s Guide to Document Procurement and Collaboration for Loan Workouts and Foreclosure” in January. John W. Kozyak of Kozyak Tropin & Throckmorton in Miami has been awarded the Jurisprudence Award from the Anti-Defamation League in recognization of his contributions to the legal profession and the community. Albert R. Meyer of the Florida Healthcare Law Firm in Delray Beach presented on PQRI at the Brevard County Medical Society Installation Dinner at the Suntree Country Club. Gabriel L. Imperato of Broad and Cassel in Ft. Lauderdale has been elected to a second term on the National Health Care Compliance Association Board of Directors. Jeff Cohen of the Florida Healthcare Law Firm in Delray Beach contributed to “The Medical Entrepeneur: Pearls, Pitfalls and Practical Business Advice for Doctors” by Dr. Steven M. Hacker. He also presented at the PBCMS Lunch and Learn event on “The Future of Private Practice.” Dinah Stein of Hicks, Porter, Ebenfeld & Stein in Miami spoke at The Doctors Company 2010 Southeast Legal Summit in Pine Mountain, Georgia, presenting the trial lawyer and insurance professional attendees with the status of Florida tort reform and case law in medical malpractice actions. Bruce J. Berman of Carlton Fields in Miami published a new edition of his book, Berman’s Florida Civil Procedure (West Group), a treatise on Florida state practice and procedure, published annually since 1998. February 1, 2011 News and Notes February 1, 2011 News & Noteslast_img read more

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FLU NEWS SCAN: EU H1N1 response, flu vigilance in Europe, flu vaccine coverage, avian flu import rule

first_imgJan 25, 2011EU Parliament calls for steps to address ‘disproportionate’ H1N1 responseIn a resolution adopted today, a committee of the European Union’s (EU’s) Parliament recommended that the EU consider the expense of vaccination against the relative risk of a future influenza pandemic, as well as consider cooperative purchasing of vaccines and provide more safeguards against conflicts of interest. The author of the resolution, France’s Michele Rivasi, said in a press release, “This report is an important attempt to highlight the concerns that have been raised about the disproportionate response to the swine flu in Europe, as well as the potential influence of pharmaceutical companies in response processes.” The measure passed the Parliament’s Public Health Committee 58 to 2, with 1 abstention. The resolution recommends that member nations cooperate better to enable mass buying of vaccines, that the names of expert advisers should be published, and that “liability for vaccines” must remain with drug manufacturers. It also calls upon the World Health Organization (WHO) to review its definition of “pandemic” to include disease severity. Last June a health committee of the parliamentary body of the Council of Europe—which is a separate body from the EU—passed a harsh critique of the WHO’s response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.Jan 25 EU Parliament press releaseJun 24, 2010, CIDRAP News story on Council of Europe critiqueECDC calls for heightened flu vigilanceThe European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) urged taking precautions this year similar to those taken in an average seasonal flu, with some adjustments, given the predominance of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus in Europe, including the fact that it has caused 90% of flu deaths. In a risk assessment released today, the ECDC said, “Many of the features and required countermeasures are the same as for the previous seasonal influenzas. However, there are important differences which Europe needs to take into consideration, notably the type of people who are most affected and experiencing severe disease.” Those disproportionately affected by severe disease this year, as during the pandemic, are those under age 65, the report says. In addition, some regions, such as the United Kingdom, are seeing more cases of serious illness than during the pandemic. The report recommends increased respiratory and hand hygiene, vaccination, use of antiviral drugs in those with severe flu-like illness, increased vigilance in the healthcare community, and broad sharing of clinical information.Jan 25 ECDC risk assessmentHispanic seniors less likely to get seasonal flu vaccineHispanic men and women 65 and older are less likely to receive the seasonal flu vaccine than their white contemporaries, according to a new Rand Corp. study in Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, Hispanic seniors who prefer speaking Spanish and live in newer Hispanic communities where Spanish is predominant are least likely to be vaccinated. Researchers analyzed data from more than 244,000 seniors surveyed in 2008 as part of a federal project and found that 68% of English-speaking and 64% of Spanish-speaking Hispanic seniors had received flu vaccine, compared with 76% of matched white seniors. “These findings suggest new strategies may be needed to target an important problem,” said Rand statistician Amelia Haviland, the study’s lead author, in a press release.Jan 24 Arch Intern Med abstractJan 24 Rand Corp. press releaseUSDA posts more stringent avian flu import ruleTo prevent the introduction of avian flu into the United States, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday issued an interim rule prohibiting the importation of birds and poultry products from regions in which any highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtype has been confirmed. The previous rule restricted entry of birds or products only from regions in which the H5N1 strain had been detected. The USDA also added restrictions for live poultry, hatching eggs, and other birds that have been vaccinated for any H5 or H7 subtype of HPAI or that have moved through regions where any HPAI subtype exists. Nonvaccinated birds or hatching eggs must be accompanied by a certificate verifying their status. Comments on the new rule will be received till Mar 25.Jan 24 USDA news releaseJan 24 Federal Register text of rulelast_img read more

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Interim Festival Directorate meets this week on CARIFESTA

first_img It is expected that at the meeting, the IFD will be provided with an update on the preparations for CARIFESTA XIV which will be hosted in Trinidad and Tobago 16-25 August 2019, under the theme ‘The Tangible and Intangible – Connect, Share, Invest’. Among the topics to be discussed are Registration and Participation, Logistics, Venues and Accommodation, Promotion, Marketing and Revenue Streams and Artistic Components and Programming. Other specific components of the Festival that will be addressed include the Marketplace for the Arts, Youth Village, Symposium as well as the Opening and Closing Ceremonies. So far, 19 countries have confirmed their attendance at this iconic festival of the arts: 16 Caribbean Member States and Associate Members, along with Canada, Venezuela and Curacao. CARIFESTA, first held in 1972, is the Caribbean Community’s premier art and culture festival. It’s main purpose, which was a mandate of the CARICOM Heads of Government, is to celebrate the arts, foster a vision of Caribbean unity while advancing Caribbean culture regionally and internationally. This roving event attracts artists and culture professionals from more than 30 countries in the Region and has been held 13 times across eight countries. Among the CARICOM Member States that have hosted this culturally iconic event are: Guyana (1972, 2008), Jamaica (1976), Barbados (1981, 2017), Trinidad and Tobago (1992, 1995, 2006), St. Kitts and Nevis (2000), Suriname (2003, 2013) and Haiti (2015). The Festival was held in Cuba in 1979. Oct 16, 2020 Related Posts The Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) – the body responsible for the planning of CARIFESTA along with the host country management team – is currently hosting its 17th meeting in Trinidad and Tobago. The meeting began on Monday morning at the Trinidad Hilton and Conference Centre in Port-of-Spain. As agreed in the CARIFESTA Host Country Agreement which was signed in December 2018, the IFD provides strategic direction and oversight of the Festival in collaboration with the CARICOM Secretariat and the Host Country. The IFD comprises representatives from the Regional Cultural Committee (RCC), the artistic community, the CARICOM Secretariat and specialists in areas such as media, intellectual property and marketing.   FLASHBACK: Delegates at the 16th IFD Meeting at the Hilton Hotel in Trinidad and Tobago Photo: Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: Vaughn Walter, Delegate from Antigua and Barbuda at the 16th IFD Meeting Photo: Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: Riane DeHaas Bledoeg, Deputy Programme Manager, Culture at the CARICOM Secretariat, Leela Ramotar, Former Staff Member at the CARICOM Secretariat and co-chair Dr. Hilary Brown, Programme Manager, Culture and Community Development at the CARICOM Secretariat during the 16th IFD MeetingPhoto: Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: Delegates engaging at the 16th IFD Meeting at the Hilton Hotel in Trinidad and Tobago Photo: Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: One of the co-chairs of the 16th IFD meeting Susan Shurland, Deputy Permanent Secretary Ministry of Community Development Trinidad and Tobago consults with a member of her staff Photo:Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: Delegates at the 16th IFD Meeting at the Hilton Hotel in Trinidad and Tobago Photo: Jeff Mayers FLASHBACK: Delegates at the 16th IFD Meeting at the Hilton Hotel in Trinidad and Tobago FLASHBACK: Co-chairs of the 16th IFD Meeting meeting Dr. Hilary Brown, and Ms. Susan Shurland pay keen attention as an intervention is made CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Oct 16, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARPHA Partners with, PAHO to Ensure Caribbean States’… Oct 16, 2020 IFD Meeting in Trinidad and Tobago to prepare for CARIFESTA XIVThe sixteenth Interim Festival Directorate Meeting is currently underway at the Hilton Hotel and Conference Centre on Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. The purpose of the meeting is to advance planning for the fourteenth staging of the Caribbean Festival of Arts in August 2019. The team is also discussing arrangements for…October 22, 2018In “CARICOM”IFD looks at venues to be used for CARIFESTA XIVThe Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) conducted a tour of venues that will be used during CARIFESTA XIV in Trinidad and Tobago, in just five months. CARIFESTA XIV will be held 16-25 August 2019, under the theme ‘The Tangible and Intangible – Connect, Share, Invest’. The Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) met on…March 27, 2019In “Associate Member States”CARIFESTA XIV preparations in full swingPreparations for the fourteenth hosting of CARIFESTA in Trinidad and Tobago are well underway. The sixteenth meeting of the Interim Festival Directorate (IFD) was convened at the Trinidad Hilton Hotel and Conference Centre where planning for CARIFESTA XIV was the main item on the agenda.   The IFD team also…October 23, 2018In “Associate Member States”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Bar’s Products Hires Director of Product Management and Engineering

first_imgHOLLY, Mich. – Bar’s Products, manufacturer of Bar’s Leaks and Rislone premium automotive chemicals, has hired Pat Mulry as director of product management and engineering. In this role, Mulry will value-engineer and improve the company’s current products, processes and quality procedures, while at the same time helping to develop new products and packaging. He also will be active in supply chain development and management.   Mulry comes to Bar’s Products with 25 years experience in product development, engineering, supply chain management, project management and manufacturing.   “Pat’s extensive experience in blow molding, bottle and label design, and various types of filling and manufacturing processes will make him a real asset to Bar’s Products,” said Carrie Mermuys, executive vice president. “We are confident that his expertise will help us develop additional innovative new products and packages that will exceed our customers’ expectations well into the future.”   Mulry has held a number of management positions for a diverse range of manufacturing companies in Michigan. Most recently, he was senior program manager for contract manufacturing technical sales at Access Business Group/Amway. He holds two U.S. utility and design patents, as well as multiple international patents.   Mulry earned a bachelor’s degree in packaging engineering from Michigan State University, and a master’s of business administration from Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Mich.     AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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No Place Like The Dance Studio

first_imgKaitlyn Matlak took her partner’s hand, twirled around, then gracefully stretched out her arm, her pinky finger delicately extended into the air. She was dancing inside a small studio at the Peconic Ballet Theatre in Riverhead one recent Sunday afternoon.She looked straight ahead into the mirror and smiled, and with good reason. Matlak, 23, of Jamesport, always wanted to learn ballet but wasn’t able to take a class until she found the Dance Express program.The program, which is run by the Peconic Ballet Foundation, teaches ballet to adults like Matlak with varying experience levels, including intellectual and developmental disabilities.Happiness has been a dance floor since Matlak registered for class.“All I like about it is that I get to be free when I dance,” said Matlak, spreading her arms and then raising them to the ceiling. “It’s being graceful.”The roughly two-year-old program is now held twice yearly, in the fall and spring, and culminates in a performance with the rest of the company, in this case, a neo-classical ballet version of The Wizard of Oz, tomorrow at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center.Matlak and about a dozen other young dancers are performing the roles of enchanted poppies protagonist Dorothy Gale and her three companions meet along the way.Over 10 weeks in hour-long sessions, the dancers learned portions of their routine with little bits of ballet technique thrown in — an arched foot here, a plié there — for a more polished performance.They practiced their line formations, joining hands for a circle, and now that it’s close to showtime, curtseys for the women and bows for the men.Peconic Ballet Foundation Director Christiana Bitonti, who has a background in counseling, said it has been a dream of hers to create an open opportunity for anyone interested in dancing.“I wanted everybody to be able to perform and dance and to be able to express themselves,” she said.Through a series of coincidences, she met up with Matt Kuriloff, who runs the Creative Arts Program for East End Disabilities Associates in Riverhead, and the two put their heads together, first for a pilot program with a few members of the CAP program, and then the final product.Kuriloff views his job as part of the civil rights movement, by bringing people with developmental disabilities into the community. Bitonti has made that happen within the arts community, he explained, noting the Dance Express dancers will perform on the stage in a production with professional dancers and school-age students from the arts community.“It’s that true integration,” he said.For other young dancers in the program, the reasons they continue to dance are simpler than Matlak’s. There were no grand dreams of the stage.Jamie Gholson, a 24-year-old Flanders resident who also participates in the CAP program, joined Dance Express at the suggestion of Matlak, who is his girlfriend.“I just like dancing. I can’t say anything more than that,” he said.Likewise, Nicholas Hallock, 25, of Flanders is also enjoying his time in the program. Dancing makes him feel good, he says.“I like to dance a lot,” he said.Hallock has Koolen de Vries Syndrome. The program helped improve his coordination where other therapies haven’t and his involvement improved his social life, said his mother, Diana Giffin. For a time after graduating school, Hallock was somewhat isolated as Giffin looked for a program for him, that is, until she found the Creative Arts Program and Dance Express.“This is where he met his true friends,” she said.Dance teacher Josie McSwane, who is leading the dancers through their routine, said dancing has become therapeutic for them.“It makes my day. It really does,” she said.Dance teacher Gabrielle Zeppieri, who also has a background as a school psychologist, said she believes dance is a good way for the dancers to destress and it helps their confidence, reducing any self-consciousness.“We laugh because we can be goofballs,” she said, adding, “They are not afraid of looking silly.”Kuriloff said the program also helps the dancers build life skills and develop mathematical aptitude because there is a lot of counting in the numbers that are performed.“That’s all of the bonus stuff, beyond the fact that it’s just fun and exhilarating,” he said.Bitonti said she is looking to see the program expand with the addition of children sometime in the future.“I think there is more to come for us. I think this is just the beginning, because they are so focused and really into it,” she said.For the students of Dance Express, there is no place like the dance studio, it’s like home now.The curtain goes up on The Wizard of Oz at 7 PM. The Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center is located at 76 Main Street. Tickets can be purchased for $15 apiece from Eventbrite.For more information about the Dance Express program, call 631-591-1539 or visit www.peconicballetfoundationny.org.peggy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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USA: AAPA Welcomes Senate Passage of 2014 WRRDA

first_imgFollowing the 412-4 vote in the U.S. House on Tuesday and the 91-7 vote in the U.S. Senate yesterday, the American Association of Port Authorities (AAPA) is trumpeting full Congressional approval of the long-awaited and critically-needed water resources development legislation known as H.R. 3080, the Water Resources Reform and Development Act, or simply WRRDA.Kurt Nagle, AAPA’s president and CEO, applauded U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and David Vitter (R-LA), chairman and ranking member, respectively, of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, for their bipartisan leadership in advancing the water resources bill through the Senate.At its annual Spring Conference in March, AAPA bestowed jointly on Sen. Boxer and House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) its “Port Person of the Year” award, although both postponed accepting their awards until after Congress passed the final water resources bill.“Now these two highly respected congressional committee leaders can accept the awards that are very much their due,” said Mr. Nagle.Many of AAPA’s recommended policy priorities are addressed in the WRRDA legislation that will become law after President Obama signs it. A number of provisions are intended to streamline project study and delivery processes and allow more flexibility to ports that want to provide funding to advance navigation-related studies and projects. The legislation also modernizes cost-share requirements, sets a path for full use of the Harbor Maintenance Tax (HMT) and provides more equity for HMT donors.“This legislation benefits every single American because it will help produce a more efficient maritime infrastructure that strengthens our position as a global trade leader, which will, in turn, boost America’s economy, create good jobs and aid in protecting our environment,” said Mr. Nagle. “AAPA thanks the bipartisan leadership in Congress and urges swift enactment by the President.”[mappress]Press Release, May 23, 2014last_img read more

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Should pro bono be compulsory?

first_img Lia Moses is a caseworker at LawWorks, a national charity working with solicitors to support, promote and encourage a commitment to pro bono across the profession. She blogs for the Gazette The New York State Bar this month made it a requirement for all lawyers to carry out 50 hours of pro bono work before being admitted. This is an attempt to reduce the number of unrepresented litigants flooding the court system since the start of the economic downturn. This requirement applies only to trainee lawyers waiting to be admitted – might the next step be to require practising lawyers to complete a certain number of pro bono hours each year? Should this idea be explored here? As the number of people in need of free legal assistance rises, the pro bono sector needs to think creatively to find ways of meeting demand. LawWorks is currently carrying out a survey of the legal profession on this and a number of other pro bono related issues to aid our thinking behind this process. Essentially, we want to know how we can increase participation in pro bono activities. The recent developments in New York would suggest that regulatory change would be enough – surely it is not that simple? There are no UK regulatory provisions specifically covering pro bono. It is purely voluntary. A number of UK law firms set yearly targets for pro bono work – usually around 50 hours per lawyer, or 3%-6% of billable hours. For the firms that choose to set targets, it seems to work really well in practice. The targets probably have little or no impact on the lawyers at the firm who are not interested in pro bono, but those with an interest will be reminded to make time to do it, and they can be sure that they have the support of their superiors. However, a target is one thing, a mandatory requirement quite another. At LawWorks we have the support of thousands of lawyers because they are passionate about using their skills to help others and/or they see the developmental benefits, both personal and professional, in doing so. The lawyers who support us do so because they want to. They treat their pro bono clients the same as their fee-paying clients, and they are sensitive to the needs of the sort of person who would qualify for pro bono assistance, that is someone who is in such a desperate financial position that they cannot afford to pay. Most also believe that pro bono is good for their professional development. However, not all lawyers share this passion for pro bono. In fact, many are against it either on commercial grounds, or because they feel it lets the government off the hook when it comes to the provision of state funding for legal services. If pro bono was mandatory, what kind of service will the dispassionate lawyers provide? What would be an appropriate punishment for non-compliance? I cannot imagine anything more severe than that which is imposed for failure to undertake the required number of continuing professional development training hours, for example. If penalties are not severe, might they choose simply to ignore the mandatory requirement? In my view, regulatory change might increase the number of pro bono hours (and it might not), but it will not bring out the professionalism that truly drives pro bono. Please complete the pro bono survey before the closing date on 5 October. last_img read more

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Russell stuns Knight Riders with one-man demolition job

first_imgA virtuoso all-round performance from skipper Andre Russell propelled Jamaica Tallawahs to the unlikeliest of victories over reigning Hero Caribbean Premier League (CPL) champions Trinbago Knight Riders on Saturday as records tumbled on a crazy night at the Queen’s Park Oval.The Tallawahs appeared absolutely dead and buried when they slumped to 41/5 in response to TKR’s Hero CPL record score of 223/6. But Russell had other ideas as he blasted his way to a quite ridiculous 40-ball century having earlier taken a hat-trick at the back end of the Knight Riders’ own extraordinary innings.There appeared little to concern the Knight Riders when the big all-rounder was dropped first ball by Ali Khan, but it would prove to be the most dramatic of turning points as Russell launched a calculated but brutal assault on the Trinbago bowling attack.Favoring the leg-side but also striking spinners and seamers alike down the ground with a seemingly unstoppable combination of exquisite ball-striking and sheer brute force, Russell bent the game to his will.Initially it restored some pride. Then it made the game appear close. Then it made the game actually close. Then, finally, it clinched the most astonishing and unlikely win in Hero CPL – and perhaps all T20 – history.Two of Russell’s sixes cleared not only the ropes but also the Queen’s Park Oval stands. Dwayne Bravo shuffled his bowling options but could not stop the flow as six after six rained down on a disbelieving crowd in Trinidad.Russell found a willing ally in Kennar Lewis, who made 52 from 35 in a 161-run partnership, but this was all about one man.His hundred came up from a Hero CPL record-equalling 40 balls with a record-breaking 12th six. By now, though, Russell’s targets were not personal ones and he was still there at the end to send the winning six – his 13th of the night – high into the Trinidad sky and over the ropes off Sunil Narine with three balls remaining. His final tally was 121 not out from 49 balls with six fours to go with those 13 Hero Maximums.Remarkably, Russell is the second man to take a hat-trick and score a hundred in the same T20 match, England’s Joe Denly having done so for Kent only last month in the Vitality Blast.But such was the nature of the single-handed transformation Russell wrought upon this game that this must surely stand alone among all individual T20 performances.It all seemed so unlikely in the first half of the evening.Having blasted a Queen’s Park Oval record 195/6 in the opening game of the tournament 48 hours ago, TKR obliterated that mark with 223/6. For two hours, it stood as an all-time Hero CPL record.A power-packed Knight Riders batting line-up sent 14 sixes over the boundary ropes – astonishing at the time but later put firmly in perspective by Russell’s one-man wrecking mission.The Knight Riders’ was an innings built in New Zealand with Colin Munro and Brendon McCullum both blasting half-centuries, with McCullum’s particularly dramatic.Munro backed up his 68 in the opener with 61 from 42 balls here, but it was McCullum who sent an already imposing total truly stratospheric.Having struggled to 7 not out from his first 12 deliveries, McCullum smashed a further 49 from his next 14 balls to propel the score well beyond 200.ine of those 14 balls, starting with a generous and extremely costly full-toss from Kemar Roach, went to or over the boundary in a blitz that left the Tallawahs shell-shocked. The 19th over, Roach’s fourth, brought 30 runs – 29 of them from the flashing blade of McCullum, including a six that came desperately close to winning him $20,000 for hitting the Sunshine Snacks target positioned beyond the boundary at midwicket. Russell then took the responsibility of bowling the final over and dismissed McCullum before bowling Darren Bravo and having Denesh Ramdin caught in the deep to complete a hat-trick. It would turn out to be only the very start of Russell’s game-changing night. The early impetus in the TKR innings had come from Chris Lynn, who plundered 46 from 27 balls and shared a 30-ball 50 partnership with Munro, while McCullum was ably supported by Darren Bravo (29 from 16) during the late carnage. Only the spinners managed to escape the worst of the punishment, with Imad Wasim conceding just six runs in a two-over spell with the new ball and ending with figures of 1/23 that would look more significant still when the final reckoning came, while Aussie leg-spinner Adam Zampa’s four overs yielded 1/35.Any hope the Tallawahs harboured of chasing the total down appeared to have been shattered within the first three overs of the run-chase as Ali Khan ripped out three wickets in six balls. Glenn Phillips and Andre McCarthy were caught in the first over, but best of the lot was a rapid nip-backer that was too quick for the vastly experienced Ross Taylor, trapped plumb in front for just a single. Shannon Gabriel bowled Rovman Powell off a bottom edge in the next over, while Fawad Ahmed struck with his very first ball for the game in a row when he trapped Johnson Charles lbw with a googly for 24 to leave the game seemingly done and dusted at 41/5. But in strode Russell to be promptly dropped by Ali Khan at deep midwicket. The rest is history.last_img read more

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Bacolod’s Agaloos bags 2 bronzes in world taekwondo

first_imgJamie Hannah Agaloos (right) and her local head coach Jean Pierre Sabido show the medals they won at the 2018 World Taekwondo Poomsae Championships in Taiwan. NEGROS TAEKWONDO UNION-TIGERS NEW GEN JAMIE Hannah Agaloos captured two bronze medals in the 2018 World Taekwondo Poomsae Championships in Taiwan.Agaloos, a native of Bacolod City and a standout of Tangub Christian Academy, captured her first bronze in individual cadet female poomsae before teaming up with King Alcairo for the mixed pair.“It’s a dream come true for me to win a medal in the world competition. My hard work paid off,” said Agaloos, who become the first Filipina cadet player to win a medal in the competition on Nov. 15 to 18.Meanwhile Jean Pierre Sabido – Agaloos’ head coach at the Negros Taekwondo Union-Tigers New Gen stable – settled for a silver medal in the 30-and-above men’s team category. A native of General Santos City, Sabido teamed up with Ernesto Guzman and Glenn Lava in capturing silver. They lost to the South Korean team in the final round 7.090-7.340.The Philippine delegation’s other silver medal was courtesy of Guzman in the men’s 40-and-above division. He lost to Ali Salmani of Iran 7.500-7.660.Other Filipino bronze medalists were Jocel Lyn Ninobla in female under-30 poomsae, and the team of Dustin Mella, Raphael Mella and Rodolfo Reyes Jr. in under-30 men’s poomsae team./PNlast_img read more

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