Harvard, ETS to study diversity at predominantly white colleges

first_imgHenry Louis Gates Jr., the Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, has announced a collaboration with the Educational Testing Service (ETS) on a study of the experience of undergraduate members of racial and ethnic minorities on predominantly white college campuses.Funded by a one-year, $400,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the study, called “The Voices of Diversity,” will survey minority women and men about their curricular, co-curricular, and social experiences in order to provide a comprehensive account of campus factors that make them feel welcome and unwelcome, respected and disrespected, supported and unsupported, and encouraged and discouraged. This is the first study of its kind to combine a focus on students’ own perspectives with in-depth quantitative and qualitative approaches.Gates, the principal investigator on the project, said, “This study is absolutely necessary right now, as we face the continuing challenge of the achievement gap between minority students and their white counterparts. The information we glean from this study will help us understand better the wide variety of factors that influence student performance.” The project focuses on undergraduates attending four universities in the United States. Researchers will use questionnaires and interviews with African-American, Asian-American, Latina/o, and Native American students as well as white students to generate their data.Gates added, “By uncovering factors that promote students’ academic and social success, we can assist administrators, educators, and policymakers — not to mention students and their families — to improve campus environments and students’ experiences.”Co-principal investigator on the project is Michael Nettles, senior vice president at ETS’s Policy Evaluation and Research Center. Paula J. Caplan, a research associate at the Du Bois Institute and a former professor of applied psychology at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, is the project’s director.last_img read more

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Fantasy Fastlane: 2018 Bristol night race

first_img Paint Scheme Preview: 2021 Busch Clash Power Rankings: Austin Dillon rises after nearly securing second Daytona 500 All of Hendrick’s wins by driver There have been 19 drivers to win in the NASCAR Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports, with the latest being William Byron. At-track photos from Homestead-Miami There have been 19 drivers to win in the NASCAR Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports, with the latest being William Byron. Fantasy Fastlane See More Fantasy Fastlane Fantasy Fastlane: Previewing the 2021 season with driver tier rankings Power Rankings, presented by Mack Trucks: New year, new No. 1 at Daytona? Paint Scheme Preview See All Paint Scheme Preview X@nascarcasmDriver WinseNascarFantasy FastlaneLineup GalleryMemorable MomentsNASCAR CompetitionPaint Scheme PreviewPower RankingsThrough the YearsTrack Winners Power Rankings See All Power Rankings Fantasy Fastlane presented by Jackpot Races: Ring the Bell at Miami All-time winners for Hendrick Motorsports There have been 19 drivers to win in the NASCAR Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports, with the latest being William Byron. Fantasy Fastlane presented by Jackpot Races: Elliott, Truex and who else for Daytona road race? center_img VIEW GALLERY Power Rankings: Kurt Busch trending up after top five on road course Power RankingsPaint Scheme PreviewFantasy Fastlane More Galleries Paint Scheme Preview: 2021 Daytona Road Course Power Rankings: NASCAR’s top 10 prospects, 23 and under Featured Gallery 2021 NASCAR Cup Series schedule in photos Paint Scheme Preview: 2021 Daytona 500 Paint Scheme Preview: 2021 Homestead-Miami Speedway VIEW GALLERY Fantasy Fastlane presented by Jackpot Races: Hard to the hole with Hamlin for Daytona 500 Featured Gallery 2021 NASCAR Cup Series schedule in photoslast_img read more

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Front Lines of Coronavirus: OH Medical Helicopter Nurse Knows How Quickly Life Can Change

first_img(c)2020 the Journal-News (Hamilton, Ohio) The CareFlight crew is small — a pilot and two flight nurses — so Oakley is trained in a multitude of advanced lifesaving procedures. Oakley, 36, is a single mother who lives in Troy with her 10-year-old daughter and eight-year-old son. “That always makes it a little more memorable, especially ones that are not doing so well and you don’t think that they’re going to make it,” she said. Oakley — who now must wear a head cap, mask, a full covering on over a flight suit, double gloves and booties — has seen the virus infect people of all ages. ___ When she returns home from work, her children stop her at the door and ask whether she had any COVID patients. On days that she has, the children don’t get hugs until after Oakley strips down and showers, she said. Oakley started studying nursing in 2003, but before that she was an EMT while in high school and responded to 911 calls while attending nursing school at the Kettering College of Medical Arts. Prior to this school year, Oakley taught nursing as an adjunct faculty member at Edison State Community College, but had to put that aside because she needed the flexibility to educate her children. “When you pile school on top of that, that’s just a big ask and a tough task. She excels at that; she does it with grace and really does a great job in doing all that in stride,” Marshall said. But none of the training fully prepared Oakley and other healthcare workers for coronavirus. Photo courtesy Premier Health’s CareFlight “We really didn’t know what we were facing, what the best practices were, what kind of equipment we should be using, how should we be treating these patients,” she said. “I see people that are having probably one of the worst days of their lives. But I want to be there to try and make it just a little bit better,” she said. Oakley knows her actions have helped certain patients survive. Oakley’s interest in being a flight nurse was set in motion when she was 14 and a boyfriend at the time was in a significant motor vehicle accident and flown to Grant Medical Center in Columbus. She assisted with his recovery in the hospital, and at the same time took notice of the healthcare workers — and those in the air. “Not only is she on the front lines out there helping those in need with being a flight nurse. But one of the other sides of all of this … is that parent who’s at home with their kids during online learning,” Marshall said. “Something this job has really taught me is how quickly life can change,” she said. “I wish everyone had that realization so that everyone makes the most of what time they have and to not hold grudges.” As a flight nurse, Oakley has responded to accidents, stabbings, shootings, ATV accidents and drownings. But the CareFlight crew also transports patients, usually from smaller hospitals and clinics to larger facilities where the patient can get specialized care. “I thought that was kind of cool, and you can fly in a helicopter. ‘Let’s see what it takes to get there,’” she said. “That’s one of the unique things with being a flight nurse, we wear many hats,” she said. “We deal with high risk OB (obstetrics) patients, we deal with the pediatrics, we deal with patients that are having strokes, patients that are having heart attacks. We kind of know a little bit about a lot.” A flight nurse on board Premier Health’s CareFlight since 2013, Oakley said her job can be both heartbreaking and rewarding. (MCT) Despite a better understanding now of how to guard against spread of the virus, the number of patients Oakley helps transport has been on the upswing over the last month — as many as 40%, she said. “We initially thought this is going to impact only the elderly; the younger people may get sick, but it’s not going to be that bad. We’re seeing that’s not the case.,” she said. “It can hit anybody and it can do significant damage.” “She represents one of the unsung heroes during all of this,” said friend Scott Marshall, who nominated Oakley as one who helps and inspires others in the region. Journal-News, Hamilton, Ohio Oakley works three 12-hour days, which often stretch into four with meetings and continuing education. On her days off she’s home helping her neighbor’s kindergartner and first grader, and her own second grader and fifth grader with their online lessons. “I would want somebody to do that for my 85-year-old papaw, and I’m glad that I can do that for somebody else’s family member,” she said. Dec. 26—A constant witness to the fragility of life, Jessica Oakley offers advice in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. Chris Stewart Better, she said, is simply holding the hand of an elderly person who’s sick or injured and afraid. Visit the Journal-News (Hamilton, Ohio) at www.journal-news.com Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.last_img read more

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The Story Behind The UCI ‘Cross Championship

first_imgBy Myles McCorry of BikePure: It’s not the Champs Elysee on the last Sunday in June. It’s not the last ‘k’ of the Poggio on the run in to San Remo, or even the coffee pot at Mellow Johnnies on a Friday night. The centre of world cycling is not the velodrome at the UCI HQ in Switzerland, the Eddy Merckx trophy wall, Coppi’s headstone or even my friend’s toilet with every pee splash cycling magazine published in the last 24 months.The world centre of cycling is Belgium. All of it. From the coal heaps of Liege to the sand pits in the classrooms of the Flanderian school children. Belgium is cycle sport’s heart. Sure, France has biking as the national sport and the Italian’s break out their 10speeds and ride for an espresso every May, the same way I only play tennis when the centre court at Wimbledon is taking a hammering. But it is not ‘blood’ cycling. For the Belgium people it is life. They eat it up, from road to Roubaix, 9 to 90: biking is life. Live or live happier- live with Lycra, sweat and passion.Cycling, the way most nations do it, is not a spectator sport. In Ireland everyone that turns up to a road race is riding, related or looking bored in a 40-year-old ambulance, hoping for a touch of wheels to use their night school skills. Cycling isn’t in the blood of the Irish (Guinness) nor the English (Soccer), the Italians (mirror) or the general American public (Mc Donald’s). You reading this, you are in the minority. Chain oil and chamois cream will be found in your DNA but not your brothers’. Ask your neighbour who Tom Boonan is, the guess reply is ‘Senator’ rather than superstar. Ask an old man in a bar in Brussels, who hasn’t been on a bike in 50 years; and he will slowly produce an eared picture from his wallet of Tom winning Roubaix. It’s in the blood.The weekend criterium results are on the front page rather than the back. Kids get a bike from Santa like everywhere else in the broadband world, but in Antwerp it has SRAM red.On Sunday past, Niels Albert, in front of a scarfed, Shimano loving crowd, won the world cyclo cross championships. He had led from start to finish and made the icy, rough ground look like track boards. The 50,000 of his countrymen, who crossed over into Holland to watch him, roared and slapped the advertising hoardings with euphoria at his every rev. Flags from the supporters clubs were stiff in the freezing wind. The black, red and yellow national colours were on faces, coats and the very air, as he passed on each of the masterful laps. Beer vanished and frits disappeared; fuelling the charge and excitement. This was cycling’s superbowl, world cup and Olympics. The refrigerated air and the snow could do nothing to put out the fire raging in the veins of the Belgium people.As the last accredited photographer to arrive at the finish, I was on the edge of the fifty strong scrum, vying for the best shot of the young Belgium crossing the line. Elbows were tensed and tempers sharpened. The zoom lenses pointed parallel on the finishing straight. There is one chance to capture the money shot of the day. Camera settings are re-checked and focus switched to manual and test fired at the line judge. Nerves are sharpened as the crowds cheer, giving notice of the rider before he is seen. Neils rounds the last bend… wait for it…wait…. then Albert crossed the line and I missed it. Completely. Every other bibbed photographer got the shot and were looking at the back of their camera to see what would be on the cover of tomorrow’s dailies or next month’s cycling glossies. I had nothing.My position was on the edge of the press line that bordered the family enclosure. Ten meters from the line as Niels raised his hands aloft, my finger poised over the shutter button: a woman let out a scream beside me. It was expelled with such emotion; I turned expecting to see a body. I took my eye off the race and the job. The noise came with the passion that only the proudest mother- of the biggest name- in the most passionate cycling country- could muster. ‘Mummy’ Albert fell silent with clasped hands. And I looked up to see her fast son directed towards dope control- it was too late. Missed it, yet the smile on my face gave nothing away.Niels who was in hospital six weeks ago getting his spleen removed, was now on the top of the world. This mother who had visited a dangerously ill son in intensive care, now looked at her boy- the champion del mondo. Cyclists in Belgium are worshipped, not an annoyance on the road – we are heroes. Travelling there is like going home.The centre of world cycling is, without doubt Belgium. The centre of cycling in Belgium last Sunday was in the proud tears of mummy Albert. She was lost and invisible in the mass of photographers; with their lens pointing the wrong way, for the best shot of the day.Editor’s note: To see more pics from the event, check out our previous post.  Big thanks to Myles McCorry for the story and pics.last_img read more

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Must Watch: Boris vs NYC, Can You Ride a Citibike up Mount Washington?

first_imgIf you ride a bike, you have undoubtedly conquered some personal goals. For some, it’s that pursuit of finding your perceived limits and pushing past them that keeps the pedals turning. After riding a Boris bike up Mt. Ventoux (above), it was time for Rob Holden to find a new challenge. That challenge? Riding our Boris bike equivalent, the Citibike up the side of the 6,288ft Mount Washington in New Hampshire.Not hard enough? Now imagine trying to do the same task, but also fly from London, UK and back, all within 36 hours. Did Rob make it? Follow along with Airspace Media after the jump… From Airspace Media:Special thanks to our headline sponsors: http://www.sigmasport.co.uk and http://www.hrhgeology.com. Donate to Macmillan at: https://www.justgiving.com/rob-holden… Livestrong at: http://laf.livestrong.org/goto/rob-ho… Shot and Directed by Ian G Laurie Produced by Matt Winstone starring Rob Holden. Airspace Media in association with Snow Digital Media http://www.snowdigitalmedia.com & Wordcomm design http://www.wordcomm.co.uklast_img read more

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EB16: KTM Lisse aero road project, plus M13 team bikes & hints of racing…

first_imgStill officially a concept bike, the Lisse is all about pairing aero frame and fork shapes with neat & full integration. The bike gets aero focused tube shaping throughout, but instead of the aerofoil and Kamm tail shapes we always see, the KTM seems to have interpreted those designs with some sharper edges thrown in. For example the aero bb shape is designed more to cut into the wind, to move air past the spinning cranks, more than a standard airfoil. The bike gets integrated fork designs that combine an aero brake layout, angular straight legs, and a wide-set fork crown which flows directly into the sharp-edged aerofoil downtube. Up front the cockpit is held together by an aero stem system, with cable routing through the upper part of the stem clamp, and integrated aero steerer tube spacers. KTM bikes had tended to focus quite heavily on off-road and we saw their new superlight XC bikes when they were unveiled earlier in the summer. But the Austrian manufacturer has been growing out of their mountain and city bike mold for a while now, and has already developed a good looking carbon road race bike and its disc brake endurance cousin. But it looks like KTM is putting a lot of effort onto the road with this new sleek-looking Lisse aero road bike project. Being a title sponsor for a French Pro Continental team, they’ve also released some team replica editions of their Revelator. And with the UCI set to reintroduce disc trial they’ve hinted that a disc brake version of the bike keeping the race geometry may be on the way… The Lissie uses a narrow aero shaped seatpost with a blunt tail said to boost comfort, that is then combined with a smoothly integrated clamp at the frame (tightened with an expander from inside the main triangle) and a thin 2-bolt clamp at the saddle rails. The bike also uses a unique combination of a deep rear wheel cutout that supports a dropped seatstay bridge with wide-spaced, squared off stays to limit the frontal area of the rear part of the bike and smoothly move air over the rear wheel. Attaching the wheels are an integrated aero thru axle setup that makes for a clean finish to the wind, but can also be swapped out for regular QRs.No word yet on when the bike will make it to market, but KTM was adamant about working within the UCI guidelines, so we’ll look for it under their Pro Conti team next season.On the current road race side, the Revelator Prestige bike that the Marseille 13-KTM (now Delko–Marseille Provence KTM)  professional continental team races gets offered to customers in a M13 replica paint job and three specs. The top replica bike gets spec’ed with eTap and DT Swiss RC38 carbon clinchers to sell for 6600€ with a claimed weight of 6.85kg as it is race by the team. A more affordable Revelator M13 Red sticks with the mechanical group and alloy Mavic wheels to drop the price down to 4000€ while only adding a claimed 150g. Even more attainable, you can get the M13 replica look with a Force 22 compact for 2400€ and a claimed 7.56kg.Now the last thing we saw was a mock-up of a disc brake Revelator in the M13 paint. It was clearly shown to be just a placeholder for the M13 replica paint job but raised the question of when a race geometry disc brake Revelator would be available. With discs set to try again in the pro peloton next year, KTM’s pro conti team won’t want to race on the more slack geometry that comes with their endurance Revelator Sky, so we should expect to see the steeper 73° head/75° seat angle Revelator Prestige get a disc upgrade for the coming race season.KTM-bikes.atlast_img read more

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Chief Justice Labarga honors ADA’s 25th anniversary with a statewide proclamation

first_imgChief Justice Labarga honors ADA’s 25th anniversary with a statewide proclamation May 1, 2015 Regular News Florida Supreme Court Chief Justice Jorge Labarga signed a proclamation honoring the historic enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act 25 years ago and designating July 2015 as a month of commemoration for the anniversary within Florida’s state courts system. “The very reason courts exist is to provide justice and fairness,’’ Labarga said. “Nothing could be more essential to our overall mission than to provide fair and equal access to citizens with disabilities.”Florida’s judiciary has a long-standing commitment to the Americans with Disabilities Act, which was signed into law on July 26, 1990. The federal law establishes “a clear and comprehensive prohibition of discrimination on the basis of disability” and bans discrimination in access to employment, governmental services and programs, public accommodations, transportation, and communications.Examples of auxiliary aids or services that the courts may provide to afford effective communication include assistive listening devices, qualified sign language interpreters, or real-time transcription services for persons with hearing loss. They also include accessible formats such as large print or Braille documents, properly edited webpages, and qualified readers for persons with vision loss.More information about court ADA accommodations and procedures can be found online at www.flcourts.org. The ADA information page includes links to each of Florida’s 20 judicial circuits, five district courts of appeal, and the Supreme Court. Each court has an ADA coordinator, as does the state courts system as a whole.Past Florida chief justices also focused attention on the requirements of the federal law. During a ceremony on September 9, 1999, former Chief Justice Major B. Harding signed a proclamation designating the year 2000 as a time to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the ADA.In 2010, former Chief Justice Charles T. Canady issued a proclamation to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the law’s passage and dedicated a month to highlight compliance. In 2006, former Chief Justice Fred Lewis ordered a statewide survey of all state court facilities to identify and eliminate architectural barriers confronting citizens with disabilities.Florida courts have also worked since 2007 to ensure that electronic documents and webpages are created and designed to be accessible to people using assistive devices like screen readers.In the proclamation, Labarga noted that the “full promise of this important federal civil rights law as it relates to the justice system will only be reached if the Florida state courts remain committed to full implementation of the Act.“I call upon judicial officers and court staff members to renew their efforts to eliminate obstacles that prevent full inclusion of all Floridians in the state courts system,” Labarga said.In addition to the ADA, Florida’s courts are bound by the Florida Constitution, which guarantees “full and fair access to the courts for all residents” in Article I, Section 21.Labarga has made improving court access a priority of his two-year term as the head of Florida’s court system. The Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice, which he created by administrative order last year, is currently working on the unmet civil legal needs of poor and middle-class Floridians.center_img Chief Justice Labarga honors ADA’s 25th anniversary with a statewide proclamationlast_img read more

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Hassan Mead to run last CC race on Monday

first_imgMead acquired All-American accolades in both of those seasons.Then he hit a roadblock.Mead was plagued by a burdensome AchillesâÄô tendon injury throughout 2009 and suffered a collapsed lung during a standard training run in 2010 while on the recovery trail.Mead said he knew the risk of injury is always prevalent in the sport of running, but said he didnâÄôt foresee the collapsed lung.âÄúThat was kind of just a rare occasion, I mean you donâÄôt really think about saying, âÄòWatch out for a collapsed lung,âÄôâÄôâÄô Mead said. âÄúThatâÄôs not the first thing you worry about when youâÄôre out there training âÄî youâÄôre more likely to get hit by a truck than a lung collapse.âÄùThe unexpected lung collapse forced Mead to redshirt the 2010-11 cross country season, but has returned to full form in his final season with the Gophers.He finished third at the Roy Griak Invitational on Sept. 24, fourth at the Big Ten Championships on Oct. 30, and is one week removed from a first-place finish at the NCAA Midwest Regional. âÄúI think how he handled those injuries is a testament to the kind of person he is,âÄù Plasencia said. âÄúHe did so calmly and with a positive mindset throughout.âÄùPlasencia said he and Mead have developed a close relationship throughout the All-AmericanâÄôs career.âÄúI felt like weâÄôve had a good relationship and got some good things done,âÄù Plasencia said. âÄúWeâÄôll be coming toward the end of his cross country career here after the national meet, so that will be kind of one chapter closed.âÄùMead reciprocated this feeling and attributed a lot of his growth as a runner to Plasencia and MinnesotaâÄôs coaching staff. Mead added that his final season with the Gophers offered an added incentive.âÄúEspecially being young and having early success you kind of get used to it and when you have a long set back you start to wonder when you will be back,âÄù Mead said. âÄúComing into my last year, I definitely wanted to do some big things and weâÄôve had success and weâÄôve had some downs, but itâÄôs the process.âÄúWe knew itâÄôs going to be a long process and our goal was to get to Nov. 21.âÄùIt was announced Nov. 13 that Mead and his teammates received an at-large bid for the NCAA Championships in Terre Haute, Ind.Now the day has finally come.It will be the final race in what Mead said has been a career that extends beyond running.âÄúI didnâÄôt think about where I am today and all the success IâÄôve had, and all the things that came along with it âÄî the people that IâÄôve met, relationships IâÄôve developed, friendships âÄî when I first started,âÄù Mead said. âÄúIâÄôm here at the University of Minnesota and running is one of the reasons.âÄù Mead still has an indoor and outdoor season of track and field eligibility left, but on Monday at the cross country championships, Mead will run his final race in the sport for which he will be most remembered. Hassan Mead to run last CC race on MondayMead’s cross country career at the Minnesota will conclude at the NCAA Championships. Dane MizutaniNovember 21, 2011Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrint All-American Hassan Mead will conclude his illustrious cross country career at the University of Minnesota on Monday at the NCAA Championships.His journey, however, started more than 8,000 miles from the Twin Cities.Mead was born in Somalia and spent the first 11 years of his life there before immigrating to Minneapolis in 2000.Upon his arrival, Mead said he had difficulty adapting to the bitter cold winter and went to live with his uncle on the West Coast.ThatâÄôs where Mead said he was first made aware of the kind of opportunities running could present.âÄúOut in Seattle, one of my coaches said, âÄòThis is something that a college university will pay you to do,âÄôâÄù Mead said. âÄúBeing young and watching other sports like football and basketball, I didnâÄôt know much about running at such a high level.âÄúThat was the point I kind of realized that thereâÄôs more to it than just running for fitness or class. I didnâÄôt think it would lead to this at all.âÄùMead didnâÄôt run cross country competitively until his junior year of high school, but impressed in his first season.He finished 10th at the 2005 Washington State Class 4A State Meet.Mead said his family wanted him to finish school in Minnesota so he moved back for his final year and a half of high school.He picked up his success in cross country in Minnesota right where he left off in Washington.Mead won the Roy Griak Invitational, the State Cross Country Meet and the Foot Locker Midwest Regional Meet during his senior year.His dominance got the attention of Minnesota head coach Steve Plasencia.âÄúIt was the fall of his senior year that I saw he could be very, very good,âÄù Plasencia said.Despite the frigid cold, Mead chose to attend the University of Minnesota.âÄúWhen it came to making a decision in terms of college, I was interested in the West Coast, but at the end of the day when you looked at what you wanted âĦ the University [of Minnesota] was perfect for me,âÄù Mead said.He was a perfect fit for the Gophers, as well.Mead immediately contributed for Minnesota and placed second at the Big Ten meet and NCAA Midwest Regional as a freshman and was named Big Ten Freshman of the Year.In his sophomore and junior seasons he captured the title in the Big Ten meet and NCAA Midwest Regional.last_img read more

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Friends at Work? Not So Much

first_imgThe New York Times:ONCE, work was a major source of friendships. We took our families to company picnics and invited our colleagues over for dinner. Now, work is a more transactional place. We go to the office to be efficient, not to form bonds. We have plenty of productive conversations but fewer meaningful relationships.In 1985, about half of Americans said they had a close friend at work; by 2004, this was true for only 30 percent. And in nationally representative surveys of American high school seniors, the proportion who said it was very important to find a job where they could make friends dropped from 54 percent in 1976, to 48 percent in 1991, to 41 percent in 2006.We may start companies with our friends, but we don’t become friends with our co-workers. “We are not only ‘bowling alone,’ ” Jeffrey Pfeffer, a professor at Stanford, observes, “we are increasingly ‘working alone.’ ”Focusing our friendship efforts outside work isn’t the norm around the world. In surveys across three countries, Americans reported inviting 32 percent of their closest colleagues to their homes, compared with 66 percent in Poland and 71 percent in India. Americans have gone on vacation with 6 percent of their closest co-workers, versus 25 percent in Poland and 45 percent in India.Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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CDC: Flu activity high across much of US

first_imgIn today’s FluView update from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), officials said flu activity is high and on the rise across much of the United States.”CDC estimates that so far this season there have been at least 6.4 million flu illnesses, 55,000 hospitalizations and 2,900 deaths from flu,” the CDC said. That’s almost 2 million more illnesses and 800 more deaths than reported in last week’s update.The CDC also said the rate of outpatient visits for influenza-like illnesses (ILI), now 6.9%, is at the same level as the peak weeks in previous seasons. Last week, the ILI rate was 5.1%. All regions in the United States were above ILI baselines. All but four states (Kansas, Maine, North Dakota, and Vermont) have widespread flu activity.This is the eighth week with elevated flu activity, and influenza B is still the dominant strain, which is not typical for the first half a flu season. Influenza B accounted for 67.9% of all positive flu specimens test last week, and almost all influenza B tested (99.6%) was Victoria lineage. Of influenza A detected, 2009 H1N1 represented 91.3% of subtyped specimens.The CDC said flu type varied by age group.”Nationally, influenza B/Victoria viruses are the most commonly reported influenza viruses among children age 0-4 years (48% of reported viruses) and 5-24 years (59% of reported viruses), while A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are the most commonly reported influenza viruses among persons 25-64 years (42% of reported viruses) and 65 years of age and older (43% of reported viruses),” the CDC said.Five more pediatric deathsFive more children have died from flu this season, bringing the 2019-2020 total to 27. Three of the five fatalities were associated with influenza A, and two with influenza B. Out of the 27 deaths so far this season, 18 have been related to influenza B infections and 9 have been caused by influenza A.The CDC said hospitalization rates jumped from 6.6 per 100,000 population to 9.2 per 100,000 population. The highest rate of hospitalization was among adults aged older than 65 (19.9 per 100,000 population), followed by children ages 0 to 4 (17.8 per 100,000 population) and adults ages 50 to 64 (10.0 per 100,000 population).Hospitalization rates were split among influenza B (51.5%) and influenza A virus (47.8%) infections.See also:Jan 3 CDC FluViewlast_img read more

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