New Mexico Public Health Office In Los Alamos Offering COVID-19 Testing Mondays & Wednesdays By Appointment

first_imgCOUNTY News:The New Mexico Public Health Office in Los Alamos has begun offering the COVID-19 test 10 a.m. to noon Mondays and 9-11 a.m. Wednesdays.Note: Testing will take place in individual’s vehicles, similar to the drive-thru testing that was previously completed at Overlook Park in White Rock. Individuals will not be going into the facility itself to get tested. Residents who want to be tested must call the office at 505.662.4038 to make an appointment. No walk ins will be accepted. There is no cost for the test.The office is at 1183 Diamond Dr., Suite D, across from Los Alamos High School.last_img read more

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First Look At New Building

first_imgThe current building. Independent/Desirée KeeganSouthampton Volunteer Ambulance’s 30-year-old building is finally getting the rebuild it so desperately needed, and early draft plans for a new 7200-square-foot structure on North Sea Road have been unveiled.Board of Directors member Jon Christensen said the current 1989 slab Butler building is no longer efficient enough for the association’s needs.“It’s antiquated — we’re putting Band-Aids on constantly trying to repair it,” he said. “It’s certainly outlived its usefulness.”He presented plans to the Southampton Town Board December 13, which calls for a small foyer through the main entrance, with bunk rooms and an office for paramedics to the left and a meeting room to the right. The meeting room will also be the place where drills are practiced, and could house outside classes like CPR training.Currently, when the ambulance corps wants to hold a meeting or a training drill, a lot of preliminary work is required.“When we have drills or meetings we have to put the ambulances outside and set up tables and chairs or whatever we may be using for training,” Christensen said. “We’re trying to get up-to-date providing some benefits to the paramedics. They could be on a 12- or 24-hour shift through the night.”A bunkroom and a bathroom will be available for anyone staying overnight on stand-by during a storm or other event. There will also be a lounge area attached to the kitchen with men’s and women’s bathrooms down the hall, an office for the chiefs and board members, and four bays for the ambulances and other vehicles. Jay Andreassi, a Water Mill resident and developer who founded Sabrosa Mexican Grill, is donating a commercial kitchen. Andreassi’s wife Donna was an active EMT member for 20 years.There will also be a partial basement for storage. And the construction will be modular, which cuts costs because time is saved while the building is erected off-site.“We wanted to streamline this the best we could, efficiently,” Christensen said. “We didn’t want to go too overboard; we wanted to get this accepted. This is what I felt was enough to do the job that we need to do, and to make the town feel comfortable with it.”He said solar panels could be added if the town chooses, and Supervisor Jay Schneiderman said a modern waste system also might be able to offset costs. Schneiderman reached out to U.S. Representative Lee Zeldin’s office to see if there’s a way to get additional funding in return for services provided to the Shinnecock Reservation, being that 8 percent of SVA’s calls are to that area, which doesn’t pay taxes. Councilman Tommy John Schiavoni also suggested reaching out to the Mastic Fire Department to see if it is receiving benefits for the services provided to the Poospatuck Reservation. Councilman John Bouvier cited a state initiative for shared services.“This could ease the burden on the taxpayers,” Schneiderman said. “But SVA has really limited the scope of the design to just what meets the basic needs of the department currently and in the near future.” According to deputy town attorney Kathleen Murray, resolutions will begin coming Southampton’s way. First, there will be an accepting of the transfer of land on North Sea Road from SVA to the town, which acts as commissioner. Once Southampton assumes ownership of the vacant parcel that is adjacent to the current structure it will receive a resolution to approve plans from an architect, construction team, and project manager. Once estimates are in hand, there will be a public hearing, although there will not be a referendum. The final step will be for the board to adopt a resolution approving the construction and going out to bid. Once that is complete the town will have to amend its 2019 capital budget to include the final expenses.desiree@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Time To Discuss Term Limits

first_imgWe certainly join our colleagues and so many others who bid Kenneth LaValle the best of luck as he moves into retirement after 44 years in the State Senate.To be approved by voters, over and over, clearly indicates a politician who paid attention to his constituency. But with repeated reelections comes stagnation; a willingness to play the game goes hand-in-hand with longevity.Those who champion term limitations do so to prevent this very thing: a politician becoming engrained in the system to the point he is insulated from some of its shortcomings.Ken LaValle was a politician. He worked hard, and he worked the press hard as well — when it suited him. When it didn’t, he could just as easily freeze out a reporter in search of the truth.LaValle, for years, voted for legislation that shielded pedophile priests — and others who preyed on children sexually — from prosecution and civil litigation. He managed to avoid the matter, even when pressed directly, but clearly sided with the Catholic Church hierarchy and others. Their flimsy argument: prosecuting the perverts would be a tax on our legal system, as if the system was more important than the victims whose lives were ruined.Calling a politician’s work “public service” is a misnomer. LaValle wasn’t a missionary. He didn’t devote his life to helping the unfortunate. He amassed a lot of power and wielded it wisely but not always evenly, and he did quite nicely during the Joe Bruno/Sheldon Silver years by yes, playing ball.He worked hard but reaped the power and prestige that comes with the job, and deservedly so.When Bridget Fleming ran against him, he ran a dismissive campaign instead of taking her on with fact-based debates. He minimized her because she was a woman, and it was done very carefully, just under the surface, just a whisper below where the ever-fawning press chose to hear it.To this day he allows the naming rights to the Kenneth P. LaValle Stadium at Stony Brook University to be in his name, when the school could sell it to a sponsor for millions of dollars.Yes, Ken LaValle was good for the environment, and good to the East End, and he deserves recognition, but not idol-worshipping. Sharelast_img read more

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Balfour Beatty Nets GBP 5.5M Hywind Scotland Contract

first_imgStatoil has awarded Balfour Beatty with a GBP 5.5 million EPCI contract for a substation and onshore cable for the Hywind Scotland Pilot Park, world’s first floating offshore wind farm.Jonathan Chapman, Director of Offshore for Balfour Beatty said: “This is an exciting market for us and we look forward to playing our part in delivering this innovative pilot project, supporting the future security of renewable energy supply across Scotland and contributing to ‘keeping the lights on.”The project office for the engineering phase will be in Kintore, outside Aberdeen, and the work will mainly utilize Scottish labor, according to the company.Scotland’s Energy Minister Fergus Ewing said: “Balfour Beatty brings a wealth of expertise to this project, which has the potential to allow offshore wind to move into deeper waters.”“Floating offshore wind provides a great opportunity for Scotland and we have been working closely with Statoil to ensure those benefits are disseminated as widely as possible to the Scottish supply chain.”last_img read more

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Construction boom forecast to slump

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

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Litigants in person ‘need more support’

first_imgA former aviation director who represented himself in court has called for the government and legal profession to do more to help self-represented people. Peter Elliott said he was ‘utterly frightened’ when he first walked into Manchester’s high court four years ago and was reduced to asking around the canteen for legal assistance. Elliott succeeded earlier this year in convincing a High Court judge to set aside a 2010 judgment against him following a long-running battle with his former employer. But last month, Elliott was told by Lord Justice Kay, vice-president of the Court of Appeal, that his lack of legal understanding did not entitle him to ‘extra indulgence’. Since then, he said a solicitor and a barrister have offered to help him appeal to the Supreme Court. ‘Looking back, I had no clue what I was doing in that building,’ he told the Gazette. ‘I didn’t even know what to call the judge and the whole thing was intimidating. It was like being in a game of chess where you don’t know where any of the pieces can go but your opponent knows it all.’ Elliott wants duty lawyers, either paid for by the Legal Services Commission or supplied pro bono by firms, to act as guides outside the courtroom. He suggested they could offer practical, non-partisan advice on court proceedings.last_img read more

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Time running out for ATE to beat Jackson

first_imgApplications for after-the-event insurance may miss the 1 April Jackson deadline if they are not made by next Monday, brokers have warned. Commercial litigation broker The Judge has written to all solicitor clients warning of a backlog of files set to slow down the system in March. Any ATE insurance taken out after 1 April will not be recoverable from the losing defendant, meaning firms are bundling several applications together in a bid to beat the deadline. In a letter to solicitors sent last week, Hannah Lee-Davey, head of professional negligence applications for The Judge said: ‘We strongly urge that any outstanding applications are made by Monday, 4 March, as underwriters are already inundated with late referrals. ‘Indeed, given the large volumes of cases already being processed by insurers, it cannot be guaranteed that even applications made by this date will be assessed in time.’ James Delaney, a director of the firm, said lawyers were sending up to four applications each at a time and that demand had been ‘unprecedented’ in the past month. But with so little time before the Jackson reforms come into force, he said some would not be processed before 1 April. ‘We think some clients are going to miss the deadline and say they were not suitably advised,’ he added. ‘There will be cases that might have gone ahead prior to 1 April that will too expensive, and there could be negligence claims that come in after 1 April.’ Daniel Morris, director and co-founder of ATE insurer Box Legal, agreed that solicitors could face claims from clients if they have not acted quickly enough to process insurance. He said his firm was advising the 250 practices on its panel to ‘check their cabinet’ and make sure everything is insured with sufficient limits for completing the case. ‘We can accommodate new business up to the day before and we’re open the weekend before 1 April to allow people to make their cases,’ he added.last_img read more

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America’s Loss: Congressman Elijah Cummings Dies at Age 68

first_imgFILE PHOTO: House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Elijah Cummings (D-MD) addresses a National Press Club luncheon on his “committee’s investigations into President Donald Trump and his administration,” in Washington, U.S., August 7, 2019. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert/File Photo WASHINGTON, D.C. – Like the rest of America, The Caribbean American community on South Florida woke up on Thursday morning to the sad news of the passing of US Congressman Elijah Cummings, 68, earlier that morning.Cummings, represented Maryland’s 7th Congressional District since 1996, and up to the time of his death served as chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, one of the committees currently involved in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.According to Cummings’ office the congressman had been ailing for some time and died from “complications concerning longstanding health challenges,”Cummings wife, and Maryland Democratic Party chair, Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, said her husband worked until the day he died because he believed “our democracy was the highest and best expression of our collective humanity, and  that our nation’s diversity was our promise, not our problem.”Tributes from Pelosi and ObamaRepresentative Cummings who was known for his powerful oratory and melodic delivery, earned the respect of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Paying tribute to him on his passing, Speaker Pelosi said, He was a leader of towering character and integrity. Whose stirring voice and steadfast values pushed the Congress and country to rise always to a higher purpose.”Former President Barack Obama tweeted, “Michelle and I are heartbroken over the passing of our friend Elijah Cummings. May his example inspire more Americans to pick up the baton and carry it forward in a manner worthy of his service.”Tributes from South Florida Caribbean American leadersCity of Lauderdale Lakes Mayor Hazelle Rogers calls Cummings passing. “An irreparable loss not only to the US Congress, but American politics generally. He sought a bi-partisan approach to solve the nation’s problem and with his approach was much loved on both sides of the political divide. Elijah was a humble and dedicated giant in American politics and will be sorely missed.”Broward County’s Vice-Mayor Dale Holness, said, “Congressman Cummings’s passing is so sad, especially at this time when the country needs dedicated, courageous patriots, like he definitely was, to heal the yawning divide being experienced in the nation. He was respected by all in congress; a man of absolute integrity who stood for absolute integrity.”City of Miramar Mayor said, “Such a major, and sad loss. He was a great man.”Relationship with President TrumpDespite his health problems, as chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee Cummings oversaw a range of investigations into the Trump administration. In addition to the current impeachment enquiry, these included the treatment of migrants, especially children, at the southern border of the US.Last August following Cummings fiery questioning of a Department of Home Security official related to the detention of immigrant children, he drew the ire of President Trump, who in a tweet referred to Baltimore, Cummings home city, as a “disgusting rat and rodent-infested mess” and infamously blamed Cummings for the “mess.”Trump’s criticism prompted a strong backlash from the African American community in general, and the residents of Baltimore, in particular. This was testament to the love and high esteem in which Cummings was held as the Congressional representative of Maryland.In response to Trump’s trade, Cummings invited Trump to Baltimore, saying, “The President is welcome to go through the 7th Congressional District. He will see strong people who get up and go out to work on the early bus. He’ll see people, he’ll see organizations that have come to the inner city of Baltimore ….and did not go around criticizing, but said, ‘How can we help?’ And they have helped. I welcome the President. I would love to see him.”Trump Pays TributeTrump did not accept the invitation, and there are no indications he apologized to Cummings for his tirade against him and Baltimore. But on the passing of Cummings, Trump tweeted, “I got to see first hand the strength, passion and wisdom of this highly respected political leader. His work and voice on so many fronts will be very hard, if not impossible, to replace!”Sherifa Dixon-Wright, Jamaican-American social worker in Baltimore tearfully told CNW, “Baltimore has developed socially and economically in leaps and bounds since Elijah has been in Congress. He was all Baltimore. He was so dedicated he came home from DC every night to the city he loved, even when not feeling well. This was a very unusual human being. He is gone too soon. How can we ever replace him?”FIU political science student, Mikhail Burger said he heard the news of Cumming’s passing just before he entered a tutorial on the role of the House Oversight and Reform Committee in Congress. “This is really weird. The congressman was my focus in this tutorial, and he had just died. Researching his life and work intensely in recent days, I found him a fearless black man of steadfast courage and integrity, a compassionate man who strived for the working class and fairness for all. He had perfect qualities for chairing the Oversight Committee. It’s such a pity to lose his dedicated service.”last_img read more

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S. Africa to administer Dexamethasone drug in COVID-19 treatment

first_imgTalk Africa: Africa’s response to COVID-19 South African Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize. COVID-19 war balloons Africa’s spending Talk Africa: COVID-19 and Food Security South African Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize. /REUTERS Early this week the United Kingdom announced the breakthrough research of the recovery trial  from Oxford University in Britain with regards to the treatment of COVID-19 patients using dexamethasone.In the trial, they studied the therapeutic effects of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatorymedicine well known in the clinical setting to manage inflammatory processes that are seenin clinical setting such as asthma, allergic reactions, auto-immune disease and brainswelling (oedema).The drug was found to reduce mortality by one third in patients who required ventilatory support and by one fifth in patients who required non invasive supplementary oxygen.The minister for health in South Africa, Dr. Zwelini Mkhize now says since that announcement, they have looked into their own context and found that they are indeed in a favourable position“Our health care workers are very familiar with dexamethasone, having used it for decadesas a registered medicine in South Africa.We are immediately able to offer all patients that need intravenous dexamethasone.”“We have checked our stock and we currently have around 300 000 ampoules in the country.This is one of those medicines where we do have excellent local capacity. There are three major suppliers of intravenous dexamethasone in the country. One of the companies manufactures the oral equivalent and supplies it all over the world and so we are able to negotiate the security of our own supply right here at home,” the minister submitted.He further said that it is a significant breakthrough in evidence based management of COVID-19. The study results are compelling because it was a randomized study that was able to recruit large numbers of participants (6425).“There is no other medicine that has shown this level of efficacy against COVID-19 to date.The study showed no benefit for those patients who did not require oxygen supplementation,” he said.The minister added that: “In fact, to have a South African enterprise be a manufacturer and supplier of a critical medicine, especially one that will prove to be lifesaving in the current global context, is a real departure from the norm and so South Africans can take pride in being one of the countries that will provide a solution to a global crisis.”“Our Ministerial Advisory Committee on COVID-19 issued an advisory to recommend theuse of dexamethasone (or an equivalent steroid like hydrocortisone or prednisolone) for allCOVID-19 patients on ventilators or requiring non-invasive supplementary oxygen.”Dexamethasone is not recommended for asymptomatic patients or patients with symptomswho do not require oxygen.“Whilst the MAC has made it clear their advisory is issued while awaiting the full study paperfor closer assessment, we have learnt that leading clinicians in academic hospitals havebeen using the medicine and they are very excited that their anecdotal experiences havenow been affirmed by higher levels of evidence.”South Africa says it will therefore be moving ahead to issue guidelines for the use of dexamethasone in all it’s facilities for desperately ill COVID-19 patients.Relatedlast_img read more

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Be ‘knowledgeable’ of human right instruments- Sir Brian

first_img Sharing is caring! Share Share LocalNews Be ‘knowledgeable’ of human right instruments- Sir Brian by: Dominica Vibes News – January 9, 2015 Sir Dr Brian AlleyneFormer acting chief justice of the Eastern Caribbean Supreme Court, Sir Dr Brian Alleyne wants citizens to understand the instruments of human rights.Sir Brian gave that advice in delivering a lecture at the University of the Open Campus, Dominica site in observance of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta on Friday 9 January 2015.The event, organized in collaboration with the University of the West Indies (UWI) St Augustine’s Political Science Department, saw participation from students of the Convent High School, the St Mary’s Academy, UWI faculty members among other officials.The Magna Carta was a powerful iconic document signed by the King John of Britain on June 15, 1215 which promised protection of the church rights, preservation from illegal imprisonment and access to swift justice.Sir Brian said the Manga Carta, “can be considered the foundational philosophical basis for modern Human right law and practice not only to the commonwealth but to the greater extent internationally”.Panelists (L-R) Claude Weekes, Thomas Holmes, Gelina FontaineMr Alleyne stated that though the original concepts have gone through numerous modifications refinements and re-definitions over the 800 year period, the basic principles have survived and are being refined and further developed.“What we have today is much broader and much more Intune with the needs of humanity,” he said and highlighted the purpose of the document.“Instruments such as the Magna Carta and our constitution today are tools placed in the hands of our citizenry to preserve and protect their own rights and interest, but like all tools, unless you take them in hand and plug them into the policies they remain impotent and useless,” Sir Brian explained.He therefore called on all citizens to understand the instruments of human rights, particularly the constitution. “We need to have intact knowledge of that and be prepared to enforce it, I don’t mean fight, but we need to be prepared to face the consequences of confronting the power structure in order to ensure that our rights are protected and preserved,” Sir Brian said.A panel discussion also convened at the event, president of CariMAN Thomas Holmes, programme manager of ChildFund Dominica Gelina Fontaine and assistant superintendent of the Dominica Police Force Mr Claude Weekes made presentations on the rights of humans in their respective fields.“One of the last evolutions of the Magna Carta and human rights was the child rights convention in 1989. They realize that within the brother human rights people were forgetting about children,” Ms. Fontaine noted.She also stated that sometimes people forget that the rights which apply to human beings also apply to children.– / 8center_img Share Tweet 347 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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