Wellington Police Notes: Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2017

first_imgWellington Police notes: Tuesday, November 28, 2017:•7:13 a.m. Charles G. Vincent, 48, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for dog at large, no Wellington registration and no rabies vaccinations.•7:28 a.m. Officers investigated forgery, identity theft, driving while license is suspended, speeding 43 mph in a 30 mph zone (radar) and no drivers’ license in possession in the 300 block N. B, Wellington.•7:47 a.m. Officers investigated a burglary in the 400 block E. Harvey, Wellington.•10:40 a.m. Officers investigated driving while license is suspended in the 200 block E. Lincoln, Wellington.•10:55 a.m. Dennis A. Mock, 46, Wellington was arrested and confined on a LeFlore County, Okla. bench warrant for failure to appear.•11:25 a.m. Jeremy W E Corter, 31, Wellington was arrested, charged and bonded with driving while license is suspended.•11:36 a.m. Officers took a suspicious activity report in the 1200 block W. 8th, Wellington.•3:08 p.m. Officers investigated a theft of currency in the 800 block W. 8th, Wellington.•4:45 p.m. Officers conducted a private property accident in the 500 block N. High Drive, Wellington.•6:37 p.m. Officers investigated criminal trespass and criminal damage to property in the 300 block N. Olive, Wellington.•10:18 p.m. Officers took a suspicious activity report in the 1100 block N. A, Wellington.•10:56 p.m. Kathy L. Cooper, 36, Wellington was arrested and confined on a Cowley County Warrant for domestic battery.last_img read more

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Harvey & Rees share the plaudits

first_imgStan Rees, Neil Harvey & Dave Smith.PSC Golf from Siam Country Resort PattayaTuesday, June 18, Pattana – StablefordOn Tuesday we went to Pattana and played the B & C course, which was in very good condition. We had nice weather and enjoyed our competition, but despite the conditions we had no top scores as this layout is long and not easy.We had an exciting battle between Stan Rees and Neil Harvey who kept each other in balance, but Stan beat Neil with 35 stableford points on countback. In third was Jonathan Pratt with 31 points. The near pins went to Stan Rees and John Feeney.Thursday, June 20, Pattaya C.C. – StablefordPattaya Country Club On  was the challenge on Thursday and the course was in good condition with some wet spots due to recent rain.Once again we had again an exciting game between Neil Harvey, Stan Rees and Dave Smith bit this time Neil edged Stan and Dave on the countback, all with 38 points.The near pin awards were claimed by Dave Smith and John Feeney.last_img read more

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Rivalries aside, the hills community stands as one

first_imgBy RUSSELL BENNETT   “THE one thing I want to hear is Gembrook going in and singing their song, and…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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Marmion Boost For Connacht And Ireland

first_imgJoe Schmidt has been handed a boost ahead ofIreland’s Guinness Six Nations clash with Italy on Sunday week with the newsthat Kieran Marmion has returned to training with Connacht. Marmion underwentAnkle Surgery after Ireland’s win over New Zealand and it is expected to playsome part in Connacht’s game with the Cheetahs on Saturday at the Sportsground.Ultan Dillane, Tom Farrell, Caolin Blade and Jack Carty also trained with theConnacht squad yesterday ahead of a crucial game for the province in the racefor playoff spots. print WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Emaillast_img read more

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THE REMARKABLE UNTOLD STORY OF PLENYONO GBE WOLO, HARVARD’S FIRST AFRICAN GRADUATE: A Story…

first_imgSunday, June 17, 1917, as Harvard’s president, Abbott Lawrence Lowell, addressed the graduating seniors at the start of Commencement Week, he cautioned them saying “this is no ordinary Baccalaureate Sunday to speak of the careers, the duties, the responsibilities, and the snares of a peaceful life.”1 Then, America was in the throes of war, having declared war on Germany two months earlier, on April 6, entering the fray in World War I.In fact, as Lowell took the podium that afternoon in Appleton Chapel to address Harvard’s Class of 1917, so many of them were absent, having already enlisted in the army, that an editorial in The Harvard Crimson described that year’s commencement “as sad as a dance record at 10 in the morning.”But, among the few members of the Class of 1917 listening to Lowell’s speech that day was a most extraordinary young man, popularly known as “the African prince.”His name was Plenyono Gbe Wolo.Born in Grand Cess, Liberia circa 1883 into a Kru chieftaincy, Wolo would be conferred with his bachelor’s degree a few days later, on June 21, becoming the first African to graduate from Harvard.4“The bugle has sounded and the youth is girding on its armor. The call affects men in three different ways. There are those who could go to battle, but, unless compelled, will not; those who want to go but cannot; and those who both can go and will go. In the community at large there are many of the first of those classes…I have nothing to say to them here, for they are few among our students. The men who graduate this week belong almost wholly to the other two categories…,”5 Lowell continued.And, indeed, “over ninety per cent”6 of the members of Harvard’s Class of 1917, who Lowell would later refer to as “the choicest of their kind”7 joined the war effort.Some would pay the ultimate price, while others were recognized for valor in combat, including Archibald Roosevelt, the son of Theodore Roosevelt, America’s 26th President and Eugene Leon Coates Davidson, an African American student on Harvard’s varsity wrestling team.Wolo too was no less the choicest of his kind and the story of his journey from his village and kinfolks to become a student at one of America’s mostWolo was popularly known at Harvard as ‘the African prince’Plenyono Gbe Woloprestigious universities, treading the same corridors of knowledge as the sons of America’s rich and powerful, is certainly a remarkable one.The Progeny Of A Proud African TribeThe son of Plenyono Gbe and Wle (Jle) Wolo, 8 he was the progeny of a noble cultural heritage. Wolo’s tribe—the Kru—were a seafaring people dispersed mainly along the coast of Liberia. One of the first Africans to encounter European voyagers along the West African coast, they became “infamous amongst early European enslavers as being especially opposed to capture.”9According to one legendary tale, after 500 Kru warriors were captured by some Muslim tribesmen following a bloody battle and heard that they would be sold into slavery, they “killed themselves in less than four nights.”10 Commenting on this tragic exploit, a Muslim writer wrote: “With death as his refuge, the enslavement of the Kroo (sic) is an impossible task.”11An impervious people therefore, the Kru resisted the usurping of their way of life by interlopers, including attempts by Liberia’s African-American founders to subjugate them to the authority of the fledgling nation’s central government. And, by 1883, around the time of Wolo’s birth, some 36 years afterLiberia’s founding, the Kru had fought several internecine wars with the government, and would do so up till as late as 1915, becoming the last indigenous people to vest authority to the government.As the son of a Kru paramount chief, 12 Wolo seemed to have been especially inculcated into this proud tradition, because, despite his conversion to Christianity, he did not adopt a ‘Christian name’ as was customary at the time for most indigenous youth after conversion.It is unclear exactly when Wolo converted to Christianity and/or commenced his schooling but, he apparently met a Methodist missionary named Reverend James B. Robertson in 1899, “who was instrumental in having him enrolled at the Monrovia Seminary.”13In an 1891 report of the activities of the Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which Rev. Robertson worked for, he was described as “a hard worker” for his work among the Kru in Grand Cess, Wolo’s birthplace.“He preaches daily, and teaches a number of boys. He has this year baptized seven who professed to have savingly (sic) received Christ…Scores are reported as seekers, but so many of them go to sea that it is hard to keep track of them, though some return with a good report,”14 the report noted.Rev. Robertson, therefore, had been working in Grand Cess for a number of years so it is quite probably then that Wolo would have, at the least, been acquainted with Robertson, and/or his missionary work, even before 1899.Also, Rev. Robertson would have certainly known Wolo’s father, Chief Gbe, the Paramount Chief of Grand Cess, most probably even from the time he arrived in Grand Cess, because he would have solicited the chief’s endorsement to live among the people and carry out his work.Plenyono Gbe WoloLeaving Village and Kinfolks: A Quest for Intellectual AdvancementThe Monrovia Seminary was the principal school of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Founded in 1839, it was one of the earliest institutions in Africa to offer a Westernized curriculum.15 According to an 1857 report of the school’s activities, its principal, Reverend J. W. Horne, noted that the students were studying courses such as History, Geography, English Grammar, Latin Grammar, Arithmetic, Physiology, and Natural Philosophy.By the time Wolo arrived at the Seminary, it was run by an African-American educator and missionary, Alexander P. Camphor, the son of former slaves.After taking over the school in 1896, Dr. Camphor “brought new life to the seminary…and by the close of his first year of administration he had begun the reorganization of the school to a high school…”wologradfullFor 10 years, Dr. Camphor and his wife “worked tirelessly” to transform the school into a leading institution of learning, which was subsequently renamed the College of West Africa.Wolo attended the Seminary at the crux of these transformations. And, Dr. Camphor, a man who “had shown such strength, both in scholarship and character that he was at once called to the Chair of Mathematics in his alma mater,” New Orleans University, would have certainly played a key role in igniting Wolo’s aspiration for further intellectual advancement.In his book, Missionary Story Sketches and Folklore from Africa, Dr. Camphor gushes about the “marvelous” transformation a few years of education could work in the lives of native children.“Children with such life as these free, happy youngsters have are usually bright and apt at books, so in our educational system we have arranged to admit them from the lowest grades on up to the more advanced classes, and they take to books with the same enthusiasm and success they show in their sports and fun. No department of our school work is more enjoyed by our teachers than the work among our “young hopefuls,” and none holds out a more cheering sign of promise for Africa’s uplift and redemption,” noted Dr. Camphor.By Camphor’s reckoning therefore, Wolo would have been the epitome of one of those “young hopefuls” when he graduated from the Seminary in 1908.Then, in 1910, through the assistance of Dr. Camphor and another Methodist missionary called Mary Sharp, Wolo travelled to the US to attend Mount Hermon School, a preparatory boarding school in Massachusetts founded in 1881 by a Protestant evangelist named Dwight Lyman Moody.In addition to the assistance from Camphor and Sharp, Wolo’s fellow Kru tribesman, Dihdwo Twe, also played a pivotal role in helping him gain admission into Mount Hermon.Born in 1879, Twe left Liberia in the later part of 1899 with only twenty-five cents in his pocket and, travelling by way of England, he arrived in America in March 1900.While in America, Twe attended St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont, Burdett Business College in Massachusetts, as well as Columbia University and Harvard University.Twe forged relationships with several prominent persons during his time in America, one of whom he would call upon to assist Wolo financially at Mount Hermon.Upon returning to Liberia, Twe apparently worked to afford indigenous youth “carefully selected from the leading families of influential centers and royalties…,” the same opportunity he had to study in America.Whether Twe and Wolo were acquaintances during their youth is not clear, but as the son of a Kru paramount chief, Wolo fitted the profile of the kinds of indigenous youth Twe desired to help obtain further studies in America.In Wolo’s application to enter Mount Hermon, which was submitted by Twe on Wolo’s behalf, he said his reason for wanting Wolo to attend Mount Hermon was “because I realize that to help our people effectively and successfully our education must be thorough in scientific knowledge and strong in Christian training. I believe and know that he’ll get the right kind of Christian training at Mt. Hermon.”Twe also wrote a letter to Reverend Percy S. Grant, an Episcopalian priest, who he described as “one of my best friends in America,” regarding providing financial support for Wolo. And, despite his initial reservation, Grant would cover the cost for Wolo’s tuition and board for two terms, and also provide him with stipends during his time at Mount Hermon.An astute student, Wolo spent only three terms at Mount Hermon, graduating in 1913 before matriculating to Harvard. Wolo entered Harvard as a freshman in the 1913-14 academic year, “where he proved to be so advanced in his studies of English that he was exempted from the second semester of the freshman course.”While at Harvard, Wolo was also active in several student clubs and did not seem to shy away from taking the lead. In fact, on October 8, 1913, though just a wet behind the ear freshman, Wolo delivered the speech on behalf the incoming international students – “60 men representing at least 15 countries” – at an evening reception held in their honor.He was elected first as the treasurer of the Cosmopolitan Club in 1915 31 and then vice president, a year later. He was also a member of the Christian Association, leading the association’s weekly meeting on the topic “Little Things” on October 24, 1915.33 Wolo was also a member of Harvard Mission, which purpose was “to increase the participation of Harvard men in the work of Christian Missions.”After Harvard, Wolo proceeded to Columbia University, where he obtained his master’s degree in 1919 and Union Theological Seminary (UTS), where he obtained a bachelor of divinity degree in 1922, following in the footsteps of his former principal, Dr. Camphor, who had also studied at both institutions.Plenyono Gbe WoloHomecoming: Advancing Education Among His PeopleImmediately after completing his studies, Wolo returned to Liberia in 1922 “with financial backing from a number of US patrons including the Harvard president Abbott Lawrence Lowell, to open a day school in his native village of Grand Cess,” where he “began his lifework, the educational, economic, and social advancement of his people.”However, Wolo’s relationship with some of his US patrons became frayed after a while, with some accusing him of reverting to the ways of witch doctors and having “succumbed to the drag of native inertia.”Apparently, Wolo’s aspirations for the education and social advancement of his people must have run contrary to the “civilizing mission” of his patrons, which was rooted in the racist paternalism and cultural hegemony of the time.He, therefore, sought to forge an independent course and, in one particular instance, incurred the reprobation of Thomas Jesse Jones, one of the directors of The Phelps-Stokes Fund, which mission was to promote education in Africa, among other things. “Mr. Wolo will need every possible influence to lead him to see that the way of salvation is not in independent action but in cooperation,”40 Jones said, regarding the need to reel Wolo in.After several years working to promote education among his people, Wolo worked as an assistant divisional manager for the Firestone Rubber Company from 1926-1929, “where he helped to solve labor problems and collaborated in the establishment of a plantation school system.”During this time, he also studied law privately and was admitted to the Liberian bar in 1929, becoming an attorney and counselor at law. In 1930, Wolo was appointed as the Secretary of the International Commission of Inquiry into the Existence of Slavery and Forced Labor in Liberia, whose findings resulted in the resignation of President Charles D. B. King and his Vice President, Allen N. Yancy.Wolo then became a professor of economics at his alma mater, the College of West Africa, in 1937, before being appointed two years later as assistant secretary of the Education Board of Liberia and a director of the Banking Corporation of Liberia.Wolo also served as the editor of a newspaper called Liberian Sentinel, and, for a time, even entertained political ambitions “but the political elite of the day erected effective roadblocks.”Plenyono Gbe WoloWolo died in Monrovia on June 2, 1940 and was survived by his wife, the former Mary Elizabeth Hansford.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Last-gasp Robben, Vidal put Bayern seven clear

first_imgRobben netted just 60 seconds later to seal victory in the Bavaria derby.It was a deserved win for Bayern after Robert Lewandowski hit the crossbar late on and had a first-half effort cleared off the line.“It was an important win for us and gives us a lot of self-confidence for Wednesday,” said Bayern coach Carlo Ancelotti.Bayern Munich’s Dutch midfielder Arjen Robben reacts after scoring a late goal against Ingolstadt on February 11, 2017 © AFP / Christof STACHE“The first-half was very difficult, we couldn’t find any space. Ingolstadt were very strong defensively.“We had to give everything, we gave everything and we’re happy with the result.”Bayern’s main rivals, RB Leipzig, Eintracht Frankfurt and Borussia Dortmund, all lost.Second-placed Leipzig lost for the second week in a row in crashing 3-0 at home to Hamburg, who escaped the bottom three. RB were two goals down after 24 minutes in a nightmare first-half as they conceded two headers from almost identical situations.Bayern Munich’s Philipp Lahm (C) and Ingolstadt’s Mathew Leckie vie for the ball during their Bundesliga match on February 11, 2017 © AFP / Christof STACHECentre-back Kyriakos Papadopoulos leapt highest to put them Hamburg ahead on 18 minutes.The second goal followed six minutes later, again from a Nicolai Mueller corner, when Brazil midfielder Walace was unmarked in the middle.Leipzig coach Ralph Hasenhuettl responded by substituting overwhelmed centre-back Dayot Upamecano, who made his starting debut, for forward Yussuf Poulsen after half an hour.– ‘Spectators in defence’ –Hamburg players celebrate after their third goal during the German First division Bundesliga football match RB Leipzig vs Hamburger SV in Leipzig on February 11, 2017 © AFP / John MACDOUGALLBut Poulsen lasted barely ten minutes before going off injured to be replaced by Davie Selke just before the break.Hamburg grabbed a late third when replacement Aaron Hunt scored with his first touch.“We were just spectators in defence and did almost everything wrong up front,” admitted Hasenhuettl.“That was untypical of us, but we are all human. We have to improve our presentation and not dwell on this.”Third-placed Frankfurt lost 3-0 at Bayer Leverkusen as Javier ‘Chicharito’ Hernandez scored two superb goals to take the pressure off coach Roger Schmidt following back-to-back defeats.Leipzig’s head coach Ralph Hasenhuettl reacts during the German First division Bundesliga football match RB Leipzig vs Hamburger SV in Leipzig on February 11, 2017 © AFP / John MACDOUGALLChicharito volleyed home a cross on five minutes, then doubled the tally on 63 minutes when he slammed home the cross with his first touch before Kevin Volland netted Leverkusen’s third.Fourth-placed Dortmund crashed 2-1 at bottom side DarmstadtThomas Tuchel named three teenagers in Dortmund’s starting line-up in their final match before Tuesday’s Champions League last 16, first-leg, match at Benfica.Dzenis Burnic made his debut in defence, the second 18-year-old in the starting line-up alongside US international midfielder Christian Pulisic, while attacking midfielder Emre Mor is only 19.It backfired as Darmstadt went ahead on 21 minutes when US international striker Terrence Boyd, on loan from Leipzig, was unmarked.Leverkusen’s Javier Hernandez (Chicharito) celebrates scoring the 2-0 during their match against Eintracht Frankfurt in Leverkusen, western Germany, on February 11, 2017 © AFP / SASCHA SCHUERMANNDortmund’s Germany winger Marco Reus hit the crossbar from a free-kick on 32 minutes before midfielder Raphael Guerreiro levelled with a bullet shot just before the half-time break.But Darmstadt sealed the win when Antonio-Mirko Colak got in behind the defence and slotted his shot Dortmund goalkeeper Roman Burki’s legs.Borussia Moechengladbach climbed to ninth as Thorgan Hazard, brother of Chelsea star Eden, scored in their 1-0 win at Werder Bremen, who drop into the bottom three.Schalke moved up two places to 11th on Saturday night with a 2-0 win at home to Hertha Berlin thanks to goals by striker Guido Burgstaller and midfielder Leon Goretzka.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Bayern Munich’s Arturo Vidal celebrates after their Bundesliga away win at Ingolstadt on February 11, 2017 © AFP / Christof STACHEBerlin, Germany, Feb 11 – Arturo Vidal and Arjen Robben netted last-minute goals in Bayern Munich’s 2-0 win at Ingolstadt on Saturday to open a seven-point lead as their main Bundesliga rivals all lost.Bayern, who host Arsenal on Wednesday in the Champions League last 16 first leg, broke the deadlock when Vidal ghosted in behind the Ingolstadt defence and put his side ahead on 90 minutes.last_img read more

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Legendary 49ers coach Bill Walsh dies

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – Bill Walsh, the groundbreaking football coach who won three Super Bowls and perfected the ingenious schemes that became known as the West Coast offense during a Hall of Fame career with the San Francisco 49ers, has died. He was 75. Walsh died early Monday following a long battle with leukemia, according to Stanford University. Walsh didn’t become an NFL head coach until 47, and he spent just 10 seasons on the San Francisco sideline. But he left an indelible mark on the United States’ most popular sport, building the once-woebegone 49ers into the most successful team of the 1980s with his innovative offensive strategies and teaching techniques. The soft-spoken native Californian also produced a legion of coaching disciples that’s still growing today. Many of his former assistants went on to lead their own teams, handing down Walsh’s methods and schemes to dozens more coaches in a tree with innumerable branches. He also helped to establish the World League of American Football – now NFL Europe – in 1994, taking the sport around the globe as a development ground for the NFL. Walsh was diagnosed with leukemia in 2004, and underwent months of treatment and blood transfusions. He publicly disclosed his illness in November 2006, but appeared at a tribute for retired receiver Jerry Rice two weeks later. While Walsh recuperated from a round of chemotherapy in late 2006, he received visits from former players and assistant coaches, as well as California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Born William Ernest Walsh on Nov. 30, 1931 in Los Angeles, he was a self-described “average” end and a sometime boxer at San Jose State in 1952-53. Walsh, whose family moved to the Bay Area when he was a teenager, married his college sweetheart, Geri Nardini, in 1954 and started his coaching career at Washington High School in Fremont, leading the football and swim teams. He had stints as an assistant at California and Stanford before beginning his pro coaching career as an assistant with the AFL’s Oakland Raiders in 1966, forging a friendship with Al Davis that endured through decades of rivalry. Walsh joined the Cincinnati Bengals in 1968 to work for legendary coach Paul Brown, who gradually gave complete control of the Bengals’ offense to his assistant. Walsh built a scheme based on the teachings of Davis, Brown and Sid Gillman – and Walsh’s own innovations, which included everything from short dropbacks and novel receiving routes to constant repetition of every play in practice. Though it originated in Cincinnati, it became known many years later as the West Coast offense – a name Walsh never liked or repeated, but which eventually grew to encompass his offensive philosophy and the many tweaks added by Holmgren, Shanahan and other coaches. Much of the NFL eventually ran a version of the West Coast in the 1990s, with its fundamental belief that the passing game can set up an effective running attack, rather than the opposite conventional wisdom. Walsh also is widely credited with inventing or popularizing many of the modern basics of coaching, from the laminated sheets of plays held by coaches on almost every sideline, to the practice of scripting the first 15 offensive plays of a game. After a bitter falling-out with Brown in 1976, Walsh left for stints with the San Diego Chargers and Stanford before the 49ers chose him to rebuild the franchise in 1979. The long-suffering 49ers went 2-14 before Walsh’s arrival. They repeated the record in his first season, with a dismal front-office structure and weak-willed ownership. Walsh doubted his abilities to turn around such a miserable situation – but earlier in 1979, the 49ers drafted quarterback Joe Montana from Notre Dame. Walsh turned over the starting job to Montana in 1980, when the 49ers improved to 6-10 – and improbably, San Francisco won its first championship in 1981, just two years after winning two games. Championships followed in the postseasons of 1984 and 1988 as Walsh built a consistent winner and became an icon with his inventive offense and thinking-man’s approach to the game. He also showed considerable acumen in personnel, adding Ronnie Lott, Charles Haley, Roger Craig and Rice to his rosters after he was named the 49ers’ general manager in 1982 and the president in 1985. “Bill pushed us all to be perfect,” Montana said years later. “That’s all he could handle as a coach, and he taught all of us to be the same way.” Walsh left the 49ers with a profound case of burnout after his third Super Bowl victory in January 1989, though he later regretted not coaching longer. He spent three years as a broadcaster with NBC before returning to Stanford for three seasons. He then took charge of the 49ers’ front office in 1999, helping to rebuild the roster over three seasons. But Walsh gradually cut ties with the 49ers after his hand-picked successor as GM, Terry Donahue, took over in 2001. Walsh was widely thought to be disappointed with John York, DeBartolo’s brother-in-law who seized control of the team in 1998 and presided over the 49ers’ regression to the bottom of the league. But Walsh stayed active with charity work, writing, lecturing and posts on various advisory boards. He also became more involved at San Jose State, directing a search committee to hire a new athletic director and football coach in 2004, and served in various leadership positions at Stanford. Walsh wrote two books and taught classes at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. “I’m doing what I want to do,” he told the AP in an interview in 2004. “I hope I never run out of things that interest me, and so far, that hasn’t happened.” Walsh’s son, Steve, an ABC News reporter, died of leukemia at age 46 in 2002.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Walsh went 102-63-1 with the 49ers, winning 10 of his 14 postseason games along with six division titles. He was named the NFL’s coach of the year in 1981 and 1984. And few men did more to shape the look of football into the 21st century. His cerebral nature and often-brilliant stratagems earned him the nickname “The Genius” well before his election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993. Walsh twice served as the 49ers’ general manager, and George Seifert led San Francisco to two more Super Bowl titles after Walsh left the sideline. Walsh also coached Stanford during two terms over five seasons. Even a short list of Walsh’s adherents is stunning. Seifert, Mike Holmgren, Dennis Green, Sam Wyche, Ray Rhodes and Bruce Coslet all became NFL head coaches after serving on Walsh’s San Francisco staffs, and Tony Dungy played for him. Most of his former assistants passed on Walsh’s structures and strategies to a new generation of coaches, including Mike Shanahan, Jon Gruden, Brian Billick, Andy Reid, Pete Carroll, Gary Kubiak, Steve Mariucci and Jeff Fisher. Walsh created the Minority Coaching Fellowship program in 1987, helping minority coaches to get a foothold in a previously lily-white profession. Marvin Lewis and Tyrone Willingham are among the coaches who went through the program, later adopted as a league-wide initiative. last_img read more

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Pochettino ‘managed like a rookie manager’ in final, says Cascarino

first_img“I think it is silly because you cannot prepare a player for a match, especially of this magnitude.“I felt Poch really managed his team like a rookie manager.“Poch got it wrong last night. It’s hard to criticise a guy who has done so brilliantly for a football club and like we chatted earlier about the finances of the club, being competitive, it has been exceptional. Green reveals how he confronted Sarri after Chelsea’s 6-0 defeat at Man City Boxing Day fixtures: All nine Premier League games live on talkSPORT Mauricio Pochettino chose to drop Lucas Moura for the Champions League final Cascarino told talkSPORT’s Weekend Sports Breakfast that the Spurs boss got the big calls wrong for the final.He said: “Kane, Winks and Trippier were three names I had written down yesterday morning.“Kane, I just didn’t get it at all. Football is littered with some clubs, and internationally, that selected players who have been injured and I don’t like it. “Poch had all the decisions to make in this game and not Klopp as we knew how they played and their personnel, we knew that.“I think his team lack experience because he is always wanting to improve players. Poch has always gone for that.“He wants to get a player in and make them better. He’s done that and that’s fine but you are missing that in the final.” 2 huge blow Getty REVEALED 2 no dice Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury deals tense Berahino hits back at b******t Johnson criticism – ‘I was in a dark place at Stoke’ Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Tony Cascarino felt Mauricio Pochettino got his decisions wrong for the Champions League final and ‘managed like a rookie manager’.Tottenham were beaten 2-0 by Liverpool at the Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid on Saturday.Pochettino decided to drop semi-final hat-trick hero Lucas Moura in favour of Harry Kane, who had not played since picking up an ankle injury in the quarter-final with Manchester City. gameday cracker REPLY Premier League Team of the Season so far, including Liverpool and Leicester stars Getty shining Mauricio Pochettino and Jurgen Klopp shake hands after the final whistle in Madrid LATEST FOOTBALL NEWSlast_img read more

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Nancy Virginia Wright, 67 of Paoli, IN

first_imgFuneral Home. Pastor James Walters officiating.  Interment will follow in the Mt Gilead Cemetery in Paoli.  Visitation will be held Friday, February 24, 2017 from 2pm to 8pm andSaturday from 9am till time of service at Dillman-Scott Funeral Home 226 West Campbell Street in Paoli, IN.  Online Condolences may be at Dillman-Scott Funeral Home.com Worked at:  Progress Examiner of Orleans/ Paoli News Republican / Springs Valley Herald,  Orange County Publishing for total of 38 years.  She received numerous journalism and writing awards from the Hoosier State Press Association for outstanding journalism and news reporting throughout her career with all county newspapers. Nancy Virginia Wright, 67 of Paoli, IN. passed away  4:30 pm February 20, 2017 at Kindred Rehab Jewish Hospital in Louisville KY.  She was born on October 12, 1949 in Paoli Indiana to John Arthur & Alta May Long Slayton. Attended Paoli Community Schools with the class of 1967 She married:  James (Jim) A. Wright on July 15, 1964. Proceeded in death by her Parents, 3 Brothers (John Slayton, Paul Slayton, and Donald Slayton) & 1 Granddaughter.center_img Survived by Husband Jim, Paoli, IN4 Sons – Jimmy Dale Wright,  Brian Ray Wright, Kelly Gene Wright & Tracy Jay Wright (all of Paoli, IN.)1- Brother Kenny Slayton of Paoli, IN 1- Aunt Helen Magill of Orleans, IN8- Grandchildren6- Step Grandchildren3- Great GrandchildrenMany nieces & nephews on both sides of her family Funeral Services will be at 11:00 AM, Saturday February 25, 2017 at Dillman-Scott Received a Journalism Degree from North Wood Institute in West Baden. Nancy was an avid supporter of the Public Library.  Donations to the Library on her behalf will be greatly appreciated.   Paoli Public Library, 100 W Water St. Paoli, IN.last_img read more

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