Listen: Trey Anastasio Band Debuts New Tune In Pittsburgh, ‘Speak To Me’

first_imgTrey Anastasio Band have been gearing up for a new album release in early 2015, kicking off a fall tour last weekend with stops in Chicago (on 11/28) and Pittsburgh (on 11/29). At Stage AE in Pittsburgh, Anastasio debuted a new tune (presumably from the new album), called “Speak To Me.”Unlike the Pink Floyd song from Dark Side, this upbeat funky-rocker is driven by horns and even includes a hand-clap sound effect from Anastasio. The set also featured the bust-out of “Come As Melody,” which hadn’t been played since 2006.Thanks to taper Scott Toney, audio for the new tune “Speak To Me,” as well as the entire show, can be downloaded via Bt.Etree.org. Check out the full set list below:TAB Pittsburgh Setlist (via Phish.net)Set One: Corona > Sand, Valentine, Night Speaks to a Woman, Pigtail, Cayman Review, Burn That Bridge, Dark and Down, Burlap Sack and Pumps, Bounce, Come As Melody, TuesdaySet Two: The Song, Speak To Me[1], Gotta Jibboo, Gone, Liquid Time, Traveler, Last Tube, Plasma, Shine, Clint Eastwood, First TubeEncore: Black Dog[1] Debut.[via Jambase]last_img read more

Read More »

Film insists U.S. educational system is in critical condition

first_imgLast month Bill Gates warned Congress that the United States is dangerously close to losing its competitive edge due to a serious shortage of scientists and engineers. The problem required in part, said the Microsoft founder, a revamping of the country’s educational system.Robert Compton M.B.A. ’84 couldn’t agree more. So much so that he produced a 54-minute film to spread the word.Education is “the most critical issue facing America,” Compton told a crowd last week gathered to watch the film in the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Askwith Lecture Hall in Longfellow Hall.“We are not preparing our children for the careers of the 21st century,” he said. “We ignore the global standard of education at our peril.”The Harvard Business School graduate knows what’s at stake.A venture capitalist and entrepreneur with 25 years of experience under his belt, Compton said he has had to consistently hire workers from India and China for his high-tech companies, not for lower wages but for higher brainpower, because he simply can’t “find the talent in the United States.”The notion that something was fundamentally different between the three nations’ approaches to education began to take hold for the businessman after a dinner in India with about 100 software developers. He was stunned by the broad knowledge and high level of intelligence of the 25 to 35-year-old men and women in the room.“They knew more about American history than I did,” Compton said, as he went from table to table chatting with his employees.In 2005 Compton began a tour of the colleges, high schools, and primary schools in India to examine the nation’s educational systems firsthand. The seminal moment came, he said, after a visit to a first-grade class in Bangalore, where he asked the children a simple question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”The answers were telling. “Engineer, scientist, engineer, cardiologist, engineer, engineer,” he said, were the repeated choices.Impressed by the high career ambitions of the 5- and 6-year-olds, Compton decided to explore with a film how the United States, India, and China prime their students for the future.His documentary, “Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination,” follows the path of six students, a teenage boy and girl from each country, as they prepare for the next step after high school. The title refers to the number of minutes a student has between the completion of the eighth grade and their high school graduation. Compton said his goal wasn’t to compare and critique the different systems but merely to show people what he saw and let them draw their own conclusions by examining how students from each country spend their time.The work caught the attention of Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of International Education and director of the HGSE International Education Policy Program, who arranged the screening.The film, Reimers said, encouraged an important dialogue.“Providing students the opportunity to engage in deliberations about the purposes of education is an essential aspect of preparing them to be leaders in the field,” he said.While the two U.S. teens in the film are diligent students and high achievers, it’s clear they live in a decidedly less stringent academic atmosphere.In her bedroom in Carmel, Ind., Brittany, 17, says she is not worried about having perfect SAT scores. Her male counterpart, Neil, is able to work 20 hours week at a local restaurant while he goes to school. Neither is committed to a particular career, though Brittany dreams of becoming a doctor and Neil, a National Merit Scholar finalist, isn’t sure what he will do, but thinks a traditional office job is probably not for him.By contrast, the documentary’s Indian and Chinese students spend much of their waking hours studying. All of them strive to enter a science- or technology-related field. They are urged by their parents to finish at the top and spurred to be the best by the tough competition from their classmates. Jin, who lives in Shanghai, reads the complicated-looking calculus text “Strength in Numbers” every night before bed. Apoorva, 17, is up with the sun on Saturday mornings in Bangalore for tutoring sessions to prepare for college admission exams.The film also consults a number of experts including Richard Freeman, Harvard’s Herbert S. Ascherman Professor of Economics, and Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.Following the screening, Compton took questions from the audience. He admitted to seriously altering the education of his two teenage daughters after his experience with the film, putting more of an emphasis on their math and science studies, and hiring tutors to help them excel.“I think I am doing what’s best for them to expand their career opportunities for the 21st century,” he said.One audience member asked how someone without the same financial means could accomplish that goal.“I think it starts with recognition,” said Compton, adding that educators, politicians, and society in general need to help raise the level of math and science instruction in U.S. school systems. “Our leaders need to produce … the rhetoric and recognition.”Some criticized his view, arguing the emphasis on a technology-based education ignored a well-rounded approach to learning.“I don’t think 40 years ago anybody knew what the economy would look like [today]. I wonder about preparing for the economy of 40 years from now by being just interested in technology,” said Jack P. Shonkoff, Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor in Child Health and Development and director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.“All I was trying to do was show what I saw,” countered Compton, acknowledging that teaching students ethics, for example, is essential, but referred again to his own experience and his struggle to find qualified workers in the United States.“What I’m saying is I can’t find that talent in the United States. … I think that has profound negative impact for America.”last_img read more

Read More »

Thresa Julia Honish Cutaia

first_img She worked for Retail Merchants of Port Arthur and Gem Jewelers of Beaumont.She was a member of St. Henry’s Catholic Church in Bridge City.She liked to read, watch TV, dance, the taste of good wine and baking.Thresa is preceded in death by her parents; her husband Louis Cutaia; brother Alfonse H. Honish Jr.; and grandson, Brice Boudreaux. She was married to Louis Emanuel Cutaia for 46 years.They lived in Bangor, Maine for 4 years while Louis was in the Air Force and where 2 of their children were born.They moved back to Texas where she lived out the rest of her life. Thresa Julia Honish Cutaia of Bridge City, Texas passed away at home at the age of 86.She was born on March 2, 1933 in Port Arthur, Texas to Alfonse H. and Phebie Jacobs Honish.She lived in Bridge City for 43 years.center_img Survivors include her children, Rita Cutaia Trail and husband Robert of Beaumont, TX, Lynda Cutaia Piggott and husband David of Bridge City, TX, Patti Cutaia Hebert and husband David of Nederland, TX, Danny Cutaia of Orange, TX, Ted Cutaia and wife Sandra of Port Neches, TX, Judy Cutaia Mitchell and husband Michael of Deer Park, TX, PeggyCutaia Thompson and husband Glen of Deer Park, TX; her sisters, Phebie Marie Honish Bodin and Ann Honish LeVand both of Hallettsville, TX; her brother, Paul Honish of LaMarque, TX; she also leaves behind a host of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.A visitation for family and friends will begin at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, October 30, 2019 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves followed by the funeral service at 11:00 a.m. with Reverend Steve Leger officiating.Burial will follow at St. Mary Catholic Cemetery inOrange, TX.last_img read more

Read More »

Cases of COVID-19 hit 35 in Port Arthur & Mid-County; check out the details

first_imgThe cases of COVID-19 confirmed in Port Arthur and Mid-County reached 35 on Friday, authorities said.Port Arthur leads the way with 22 cases. Nederland and Groves each have five, while Port Neches has three.The latest reports were released by the Southeast Texas Regional Emergency Operations Center, which consolidates all information related to COVID-19 activities in Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Newton, Orange and Tyler counties. Authorities said the call center received 99 calls on Friday.Citizens are encouraged to call 409-550-2536 for an appointment for testing. The Call Center is open 24-hours, seven days a week.If you are looking for information about COVID-19, call 211, option 6 or visit covid-19-jeffco.hub.arcgis.com.last_img read more

Read More »

Scott Giles: How I did on my SBACs

first_imgby Scott A Giles, VSAC Nobody likes to take tests, myself included. So it was with a fair amount of trepidation that I accepted to Secretary Holcombe’s invitation to take the new Smarter Balanced Assessments in April. My anxiety increased when I entered Montpelier High to discover we would be taking the 11th grade math assessments. Three of us had accepted the challenge and each suppressed visions of impending public humiliation like that reserved for adult contestants on “Are you smarter than a 5th grader?” So why did we agree to do this?Vermont, like many states, is raising its educational standards to ensure that our children have the knowledge and skills to be active citizens and compete in the 21st century global economy. Our goal is to ensure that every child graduates from high school with the tools they need to successfully pursue education, training and career.This year we introduced new assessments aligned to these standards. The SBACs, as they are called, use computer-based adaptive testing to assess proficiency in Common Core standards for English/language arts and mathematics. Many people have opinions about the value and quality of testing—but few actually take the assessments themselves. I wanted the opportunity to learn firsthand what we are asking of Vermont students.Let me start by saying the SBAC isn’t the multiple-choice, bubble test from my high school days.The computer adaptive testing “personalizes” the difficulty of questions throughout the assessment, based on student responses. When I answered a question correctly, my next question was harder. If I was wrong, my next question was easier.  Each student will be challenged to the top of their ability and no students will receive the exact same test.There was also an interactive assessment led by a teacher that was fun, relevant to the interests of students, and required the application of all the same concepts,  reasoning and problem-solving skills measured by the earlier assessment.This test is hard. I have multiple advanced degrees and left sure that I had not performed well (I was pleasantly surprised by my score— and tried unsuccessfully to get cred with my kids). That said, I recognized every question as something that I once knew and as something that was important that our students be able to reason through and apply.This is a significant and important change. Students and teachers will have more accurate and realistic measurements of knowledge levels and student progress. The results will help refine curriculum and teaching, where and when needed. Students will have a snapshot of what they have achieved and know where they need to focus their efforts.  Importantly, it will give us a window into a whole range of equity issues.No test is perfect but I think this is a move in the right direction. Vermont’s first test results – which will be sent by local schools to parents soon – will probably require a re-tooling of our collective perspective as educators, parents and students about what it means to be proficient. The scores are different and they may alarm some who will view them as proof that Vermont’s K-12 system isn’t working or that the test is too difficult.I disagree.VSAC’s own research has shown repeatedly that students who are more academically prepared are much more likely to go on to for more education – regardless of family income or parents’ educational levels.We have raised our expectations to ensure that all students develop the knowledge and problem-solving skills they need to succeed.  These scores will likely show us that we must work to achieve these higher standards. The real test will be how we use what we learn.Scott Giles is president and CEO of Vermont Student Assistance Corp. and chairman of the Vermont PreK-16 Council.last_img read more

Read More »

Huge Wall Street fines raise calls for more transparency

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Dunstan PrialThe simple truth is that no one really knows where most of the money goes.As the penalties levied by the U.S. government on big Wall Street banks charged with all manner of fraud tied to the 2008 financial crisis soars toward $100 billion, an obvious question that’s been asked again and again is: “Where does all that money go?”The short answer is that most of it goes to the Treasury Department, where it disappears into the great maw of the federal budget, helping to pay down U.S. debt and offset an array of unspecified government expenditures.It’s the “unspecified” part that bothers people.“When this money is obtained (through settlements), where it goes, what it’s used for, how it’s dealt with is something most members of the public would want to know and should be told,” said former Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Harvey Pitt. continue reading »last_img read more

Read More »

Independent Living Docket

first_img December 1, 2008 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Independent Living Docket SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JUDGE NIKKI CLARK arrives at the first Independent Living Docket at the Leon County Courthouse, where she gave aging-out foster kids special attention, helping them prepare for life on their own. Before taking up the first case, Clark chats with, from the left, DCF Secretary George Sheldon, Florence Rivas, and Justice Barbara Pariente. Helping foster kids transition into adulthood Senior Editor“Look at these grades! Straight A’s!” Second Judicial Circuit Judge Nikki Clark exclaims, as 17-year-old Ashley stands before her at the inaugural Independent Living Docket for aging-out foster kids.Applause erupts in the courtroom.“Ashley, I am so incredibly proud of you. Are you proud of you?” the judge asks.Ashley smiles, surrounded by lawyers on her case who rattle off the latest details of her progressing life: Two sons, ages 3 and 21 months, go to day care, while Ashley works to get her high school diploma at Tallahassee’s Teenage Parent Program, where she has been selected to mentor other girls.For now, she still wants to live with nurturing foster parents who took her and her kids into their loving home in September 2007.“We’re like a family now. I would hate to leave them, but I really feel like I want to be on my own,” Ashley said shortly before it was her turn to step up to the bench. “Then, again, I want to be with them.”Traveling on this uncertain road to independence, Ashley is receiving help finding an apartment and encouragement to go to college, and she says she may want to become a lawyer.“Girl, that’s wonderful!” Judge Clark says. “As well as you’re doing, you’ll be able to go to college anywhere you want to.”The judge makes sure Ashley has all her important documents — driver’s license or state ID, Medicaid card, birth certificate, Social Security card, banking and scholarship info, and even voter registration material, because voting is a responsibility of adulthood, too.After checking whether Ashley is current on her medical and dental exams, Clark appoints an attorney ad litem. Ashley then takes a seat in the back of the courtroom to huddle with her guardian ad litem, Jim Kallinger, who also serves as the governor’s chief child advocate.Ashley’s was one of seven cases called October 30, at the first Independent Living Docket in the Second Circuit. Here, at this monthly, separate, small docket, Judge Clark will dedicate quality time to several of Leon County’s 25 foster children when they are 16 and 17, become pregnant, or have children — so they can work on a plan before they are flung out into the world on their own at age 18 or 19.The mission, Clark said, is “to make sure they understand their rights as foster children and to make sure they have educational and life skills to be able to make it on their own. This docket will allow the youth a better opportunity to be fully engaged in their independent living case plans and will empower them to take control of their lives.”After researching a similar program in the Sixth Judicial Circuit in St. Petersburg, Clark worked to bring the concept to Tallahassee.“We could not have put this docket together had it not been for the enthusiasm and absolute dedication and commitment of Department of Children and Families lawyers, case managers, the guardian ad litem, the school board, and Big Bend Community Based Care,” Judge Clark said. “They agreed to do this with no additional personnel. . . because they recognize how important it is to get the teens the time and energy to do whatever we can do to make sure that they reach the goal of success.”Helping aging-out foster children is one of Chief Justice Peggy Quince’s key challenges for her term, and she came to Clark’s court to celebrate.“This is just really a tremendous innovation, and it’s happening at a time when the court system is having, as we all know, great budgetary problems,” Quince said.“But this really is a testament to what can be done, even though there are obstacles. When you have a great idea, you can make it work.” Quince thought back to when she was 18 “and about to go off and be independent, or so I thought. But, of course, I had some cushion. I knew that my dad was there. I knew that other family members were there. At 18, I was not ready to go out into the world. We cannot expect our young people who have been in foster care for a number of years to be ready to go out in the world at age 18.“So we need to give them the kind of assistance that they need in order to become good and productive citizens. That’s what all of us — everyone in this room — that’s what we want for these young people. We don’t want to see them become homeless. We don’t want to see them become a part of the criminal justice system. We want to see them take our positions in the world. Because, quite frankly, I’m getting up there in age, and I’m going to have to retire one day soon. And I want some of these young people to come behind me,” Quince said with a laugh.DCF Secretary George Sheldon said when he first arrived at the department as second in command, he and then Secretary Bob Butterworth sat down with a dozen young people who had aged-out of foster care.“I learned more in those two-and-a-half hours from those young people about what happens in foster care than I learned from all the professionals statewide,” Sheldon said.Since then, he said, 117 young people have been hired at DCF to keep teaching about both the emotional and practical needs of foster children, who, for example, have never been inside a bank, balanced a checkbook, or planned a budget.“What you have done, and what this court is doing in terms of trying to find out what the needs of these kids are, so that we bring resources to those kids, is critical,” Sheldon told Judge Clark.“I congratulate you on what you do and I urge the chief to talk to other circuits, because they ought to follow your lead in Leon County.”Clark then introduced one of those aged-out foster kids, 23-year-old Derrick Riggins, as “very instrumental in helping us figure out what it is we need to do to get our Independent Living Court going and to help us out.”“When you take a youth who has been through foster care, and they age out, and you come up with this plan, and you don’t sit down and discuss it with them, and reassure them that, ‘Hey, this is for you,’ that is a let-down to that youth. You are just setting that youth up to fail,” said Riggins, a member of Florida Youth SHINE, sponsored by Florida’s Children First, made up of young adults who have aged out of foster care and help current and former foster children become their own best advocates.To the aging-out foster kids in the courtroom, Riggins said: “I love the fact that you can come to court and Judge Clark doesn’t bash you on your appearance. I challenge you guys to truly take advantage of these opportunities that are presented to you, because not long ago, we didn’t have this voice that we have now.”Sometimes that voice would rather speak privately with the judge.Judge Clark asks Rodney, about to turn 18 the following month, “Is there anything going on you want to talk to me about?”Rodney said there is, but he prefers to step up to the bench and kneel at Judge Clark’s side, where they have a private tête-à-tête.“Do you want me to keep your case open?” Judge Clark asks after their hushed conversation ends.“No,” Rodney answered.“Then, I won’t,” Judge Clark said.Next, it’s time to focus on Brittany, pregnant with her second child. Judge Clark asks if she is getting prenatal care and her baby is up on his shots. The judge wants to pursue child support, even though no one knows the whereabouts of the child’s father. They talk about where to get a crib for the baby on the way and whether living with her brother is working out. Clark sets the case for another hearing in three months.“Maybe you can bring the new baby in,” Judge Clark tells Brittany. “Good luck with the new baby. If there’s something we can do to help you out, just let us know.” Independent Living Docketlast_img read more

Read More »

Highlands Village Equities purchases The Shoppes at Highlands Village

first_imgCassidy Turley announced the sale of The Shoppes at Highlands Village, a grocery-anchored neighborhood shopping center at 1145 N. Ellsworth Rd. in Mesa, Ariz. Highlands Village Equities, LLC (a company formed by Glenwood Development Company) purchased the 87,486 square foot center for $10.05 million from Donahue Schriber Realty Group.Cassidy Turley Executive Managing Directors Ryan Schubert, Michael Hackett, Dan Wald and Matt Kircher negotiated the transaction.“The Shoppes at Highlands Village received tremendous interest from the market and ended up being a perfect fit for Mesa-based Glenwood Development Company,” Mr. Schubert said.“Glenwood was attracted to the quality of the bricks and mortar, the long-term lease with Bashas’ and the significant upside in nearly 16,000 square feet of vacant shop space. Further, the demographics of this submarket within Mesa present a bright future for the property.”Located on 9.4 acres on the southeast corner of Ellsworth and Brown roads, The Shoppes at Highlands Village is anchored by Bashas’ grocery store and supported by national retailers including Chase Bank, Subway and Fantastic Sam’s. Developed in 2004 by Donahue Schriber Realty Group, the property is located one mile east of the Loop 202 Freeway.last_img read more

Read More »

A psychologist reveals ‘the single biggest predictor of human happiness’

first_imgRead the whole story: Business Insider More of our Members in the Media > Business Insider: When psychologist Arthur Aron was a graduate student in the 1960s, he was looking around for something to study for his dissertation. But he didn’t want just any topic. He wanted to find one “that people thought couldn’t be studied scientifically and then prove that it could be,” he said.And then he fell in love — and that was all he could think about.It was hard, at first, for researchers to take Aron’s study of love and romantic relationships seriously. “Early on,” Aron told us, “it was a topic on the margins.” But it quickly became clear that it deserved a closer, more scholarly look.last_img read more

Read More »

HSNW: First Responders Radiological Preparedness

first_imgFirst responders and emergency managers train on how to plan for the first minutes of a radiological dispersal device detonation response. Courtesy/HSNWHSNW News:A radiological dispersal device (RDD), or “dirty bomb,” detonation in a local jurisdiction will have significant consequences for public safety, responder health and critical infrastructure operations.First responders and emergency managers must quickly assess the hazard, issue protective action recommendations, triage and treat the injured, and secure the scene in support of the individuals, families and businesses in the impacted community.This is why, in 2017, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL), in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) published guidance for first responders and emergency managers on how to plan for the first minutes of an RDD detonation response.S&T says that the Radiological Dispersal Device Response Guidance Planning for the First 100 Minutes is the result of years of scientific research and experimentation conducted by DOE laboratories – Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories – coupled with S&T NUSTL’s direct conversations with first responders about operationalizing and documenting the scientific recommendations. The Guidance includes five missions and ten tactics to address initial response efforts. It is intended to be engaging and easy to use, allowing communities to plug in their specific assets, agencies and response protocols.“The Guidance provides emergency planners and first responders across the nation with a playbook of best practices to start from in planning for a RDD detonation response,” said S&T NUSTL Program Manager Ben Stevenson.Now that the Guidance is published, S&T’s NUSTL is leading efforts to make it accessible to the responder communities who will need to incorporate it into their planning efforts and to state and federal partners that will support the response.Animating the guidanceTo support responder understanding of the missions and tactics described in the RDD Response Guidance, S&T’s NUSTL worked with DOE’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to animate the missions and tactics.Source: Homeland Security News Wirelast_img read more

Read More »