Must Watch: Chris Froome Becomes the First Man To Bike the Channel Tunnel

first_img100 meters under the sea, Chris Froome recently became the first man to blast the 33.46 mi (53.85 km) from England to France through the Channel Tunnel. The service tunnel used is one of the most high security sites in the UK and France, and it took six months for Jaguar and Team Sky to organize the video shoot.Drop past the break for the awesome footage. A previous Tour de France Winner, and hopeful for this year, he completed the ride in 55 minutes, reaching speeds of up to ~40mph (65 km/h). For comparison, the Eurostar takes roughly 35 minutes to travel the tunnel and hits 100mph, while commercial ferry trips last ~90min.About the experience, Froome said:“Cycling under the sea was an incredible experience. Opportunities to become the first person in the world to achieve these kind of feats are extremely rare nowadays, especially as a pro-cyclist.”Just in case you’re listening Jaguar, thanks for the great advertising campaign, and could you please bring the XF Wagon to the US (in a manual, or maybe a diesel?).last_img read more

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EB16: Cratoni debuts aero C-Pro helmet, smart C-94 concept & Maxster details

first_imgSynched by Bluetooth with a smart phone app and a handlebar remote control the C-94 could collect ride data and even snapshots on your ride and upload them to the cloud in real-time. With built-in sensors it could also detect a crash and signal for help if needed. Of course it has to look cool too, so Cratoni has designed in an angular futurist aesthetic and built-in an integrated wind screen.Maxster & Maxster ProWe already saw a preview of the Maxsters, but now having help them in our hands we have a better sense of how improved they are over regular kids helmets. At first glance in person, the shiny 45€ Maxsters for the littler kids doesn’t look so much different from most small children’s helmets out there, but the vents really do seem bigger and the helmet is nicely light. The retention mechanism is good and simple, integrating a little red LED blinkie light, and it really does seem to offer more occipital coverage out back.The 50€ matte finished Maxster Pro on the other hand has the feel of a much higher quality helmet. Even though it is essentially the same shape, the different finish and addition of the visor really makes this stand out, looking much more like a quality trail helmet than anything else out there for kids. I can imagine a lot of young shredders would feel a lot cooler sporting one of these new lids.Cratoni.com Helmet maker Cratoni showed off some nice looking full feature helmets for kids just before the tradeshows began this past month with their new Maxster and Maxster Pro. Then they followed that up a few weeks later with the C-Pro, an all new vented aero road helmet for us adults. In the recent trend of the semi-aero helmet the C-Pro cuts down the number of side and top vents to limit drag, but keeps generous forward facing vents that they say gives enough ventilation to make it serve well at the slower speeds on a mountain bike as much as on the road.  At Eurobike we got a close look at these two different helmet lines, plus a new C-94 concept helmet project that would serve the urban rider with integrated smart lighting, crash sensors, and more connectivity…C-ProThe new C-Pro redefines the top of both Cratoni’s road and XC lineup. Like many other bike and accessory companies, they’ve seen the incremental gains that can be made with tweaking designs with an aero focus, and even a vented aero helmet like this has been shown to shave time off in a race.With 7 big front facing vents connected by deep channels under the closed top of the shell to 8 exhaust ports at the back, the C-Pro is said to offer through ventilation on par with Cratoni’s fully vented helmets. And by keeping the top closed, not only is the helmet more slippery in the wind, but they were able to open the foam on the top of the helmet a bit to deepen the internal channels without decreasing its protection. That also let Cratoni extend coverage a bit further down the back of the head, offering even more protection than you often get in an aero helmet, without really adding much weight. What results is a 210g helmet with a height adjustable retention system and a slippery shell.The C-Pro even includes a few small reflective details for improved visibility and Cratoni’s easy to use one-handed chain strap. The C-Pro also has an accessory that will let you clip an action cam directly to the upper vent, and it comes with an additional set of pads with bug stopping mesh. The C-Pro will sell for 230€ and comes in orange, white, lime green, black, and black with blue.C-94The C-94 helmet is still just a concept, so don’t expect it to hit the shelves too soon, but we’ve started to see more and more of these smart connected helmets, so it is nice to see some being developed by actual helmet makers instead of just Kickstarter campaigns.Cartoni’s concept would be geared towards the urban rider and bike commuter and combines ideas like integrated turn signals and a brake light with connectivity like hands-free mobile phone use and even helmet-to-helmet walkie-talkie functionality.last_img read more

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Gophers’ Dock, Greenlund balance cross country with medical school aspirations

first_imgGophers’ Dock, Greenlund balance cross country with medical school aspirationsThe redshirt juniors have had their best seasons with Minnesota while planning for medical school in the future.Sarah Mai Brendan O’BrienNovember 2, 2019Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintMinnesota cross country runners Carissa Dock and Lindsey Greenlund have both enjoyed the busy 2019 season despite the added stress that both of them face as they look to their future in medical school. After applying to and interviewing with several medical schools, Dock’s top four choices are Duke, UC San Diego, Minnesota and Boston University. Greenlund has been accepted into Loyola University Chicago and Saint Louis University. She has also interviewed at Tulane and Minnesota with more interviews coming up.Both have at least one parent in the medical field who was an inspiration growing up. Dock and Greenlund also had specific moments when they knew they wanted to work in the medical field. For Dock, it was when she interned at the medical device company Minnetronix, and patients came in to talk about how the devices she and others worked on changed their lives.“In that moment I realized that talking to patients and seeing my work was affecting lives was something I loved and something I wanted to be able to see for the rest of [my] career,” Dock said.Greenlund knew she wanted to go to medical school when she was shadowing others in the field and saw patients coming in to receive their medication.“It made me realize we are all just people who just need help sometimes and it’s just such a special role as a physician to provide that help and care,” Greenlund said. Dock and Greenlund said one reason the process has been easier is that women’s head coach Sarah Hopkins has helped alleviate the pressure.“One of the biggest things has been coach Hopkins,” Greenlund said. “Her flexibility with me has been so helpful because she’s helped me to move my workouts to days that I won’t be missing and to take an extra day off if things are just crazy.” Dock agrees. “I think it’s super helpful that [she] is super encouraging of us having big goals and big pursuits inside … and outside of running,” Dock said. “I think it’s really cool and unique that she cares so much about us as athletes but also as people.”At the beginning of the season, Hopkins was not sure how the two runners would handle cross country, medical school interviews and the rest of undergraduate school. But now she is impressed by how Dock and Greenlund have been determined and willing to make sacrifices throughout the season in order to reach their goals.“To see these two be able to manage all of that stuff … and keep these balls in the air and do them all so well,” Hopkins said, “Speaks to their personalities, their drive, their sort of laser focus and being willing to put a lot of other things on the back burner.” The redshirt juniors recorded career-best times in a six-kilometer race at the Nuttycombe Invitational earlier this season and will race for the Gophers at the Big Ten Championships on Nov. 3. Both have had similar mindsets when training and competing this season.“My main goal was to run only races I am proud of,” Greenlund said. “That for me has been really good because I’ve realized throughout these years as long as I just do everything I can and put it all out there and give it what I have for that day, I’ll be pretty happy with it.”“It’s a super unique experience and we’ll never really have the chance to be on a team like this again in our lives,” Dock said. “So I think that my mantra for the year was just at this point I have nothing to lose so just try to enjoy [the] moment and give it all when you can.”last_img read more

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Control Yourself! Inhibiting Physical Action Cuts Risky Gambling and Drinking

first_imgTIME:Want to gamble smarter, make less risky financial decisions or cut down on your drinking? Practice stopping yourself midway through a simple physical movement, new research suggests.Although controlling risky impulses may seem unrelated to inhibiting physical movements, research increasingly finds that the brain processes both situations similarly. That means that getting better at one type of choice is associated with improvements in the other. The connection could have important implications for the treatment of all types of addictive behaviors — and perhaps for decision-makers on Wall Street as well.To examine the association, researchers led by Frederick Verbruggen at the University of Exeter in England conducted three experiments, studying people playing a gambling video game. In the first experiment, 44 people were paid about $10 an hour to play the game, plus whatever money they won. Participants were given a choice of betting on one of six rising columns, each representing a different sum of money. The greater the potential gain, the lower the odds of winning — so betting on larger amounts was the riskier move, since it could also lead to greater losses. The players had to make their choices within a small window of time, as the bars rose on the screen.Read the whole story: TIMElast_img read more

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News Scan for Aug 31, 2015

first_imgSierra Leone woman dies from Ebola; lab study shows clinical patternsSierra Leone health officials said yesterday that tests on a 67-year-old woman who died in Kambia district were positive for Ebola, but further testing is under way to confirm the findings, Reuters reported yesterday. The positive test is the country’s first since its countdown to Ebola-free status began on Aug 24.Brima Kargbo, MD, Sierra Leone’s chief medical officer, told Reuters that two samples from the woman were positive in tests in Kambia district, but further tests are being conducted in Makeni and Freetown to rule out a potential error in initial tests, given that Kambia district has gone 50 days without a confirmed Ebola case.The woman died on Aug 29. She had worked as a trader and apparently had not traveled recently, according to the report.  Sierra Leone’s last known Ebola patient was discharged from the hospital on Aug 24, signaling the start of its 42-day countdown.Aug 30 Reuters storyIn other Ebola developments, a Chinese mobile lab team that served in Sierra Leone last fall reported today on clinical patterns they saw during their experience, including fever in three fourth of patients. They reported findings from cases at the Sierra Leone-China Friendship Hospital in Western Area district, about 19 miles west of Freetown, from late September to mid November 2014 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.Of 1,635 samples from suspected Ebola patients, 824 (50.4%) were positive, constituting about a third of all cases reported in Sierra Leone during the study period. The team found that 84.6% of the patients who tested positive lived near main roads connecting rural towns to highly populated urban areas.At the time of testing, 75.7% of patients had fever and 94.1% reported at least one gastrointestinal symptom. Viral loads were higher in those with fever, diarrhea, fatigue, or headache. The investigators also found that the case-fatality rate was lower in patients ages 15 to 44 years old and in people with lower viral loads.Aug 31 Emerg Infect Dis report Americas chikungunya cases rise by nearly 28,000In its latest update on chikungunya in the Caribbean and the Americas, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on Aug 28 reported 27,867 new cases, bringing the outbreak total to 1,707,090.The number of new cases was down a bit from the 34,866 new cases reported the previous week.The new total includes 541,468 suspected, 18,039 confirmed, and 814 imported cases, bringing the total for 2015 to 560,321 so far. Earlier reported death dropped from 63 to 60 during the most recent reporting week, likely because of ongoing lab testing and case confirmation.Colombia, which now has 320,891 cases in 2015, has reported the region’s most cases by far this year. PAHO’s latest update reflects 2,280 new suspected cases for that nation. Honduras, however, reported the biggest jump, with 22,673 new cases in the most recent 7 weeks, bringing its total for the year to 71,840. Other countries reporting increases are Ecuador with 1,009 suspected cases over a 3-week period, and Venezuela, with 450 more.The epidemic started in December 2013 with the detection of the Americas’ first locally acquired chikungunya cases on St. Martin in the Caribbean.Aug 28 PAHO updatelast_img read more

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Stepping Up To The Plate

first_imgLife was cut short at only 47 years old for Walter Plate, an American abstract painter who emerged after World War II. Plate served in the marines before settling in Woodstock, NY, where he’d have his studio and achieve fame in the 1950s and ’60s. His solo exhibits included the Stable Gallery, five Whitney Annuals, and group shows at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Art Institute of Chicago, Corcoran Gallery in Washington D.C., and more.Plate (1925-1972) and his family would visit his brother, William, in East Hampton annually. These visits contributed to his artistic style. The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs will show a selection of 11 paintings on paper by Walter Plate (1925-1972) from August 1 through October 31. The exhibit’s fully illustrated catalog will feature an essay by Plate’s son, Marc, as he offers insight to his father’s background. Indy recently caught up with Marc for an interview.What was the dynamic like at home?I saw how hard he worked. It was interesting because my mother was an art teacher in the elementary school system, so she supported his work and the family in the ’50s and ’60s. As an artist, particularly in those times, there was a lot of isolation. He secluded himself in the studio, like many of his artist friends, all day, most of the night, working on whatever. He told me: never be an artist or get married. I took his advice for a long time. And then I ended up doing art in New York for 18 years and got married at 34, had a family.What do you remember about your childhood visits to East Hampton?I remember going out there with my brother, father, and my mother to my Uncle Bill’s place. He had a house a block away from the ocean. He and Herman Cherry introduced my father to a lot of the artists in the area. Every summer we would go, there’d be a lot of socializing at night. From mine and my brother’s point of view, it was all just emotion oriented. All we did was just play by the shore and do a lot of events there with other kids.What do you think influenced your father’s paintings?When he was in Woodstock, in the ’50s, he was immersed in the mountains and the greenery for most of the year. And that was what was distilled in his paintings. His studio was right there, with a beautiful, panoramic view of the mountains. His paintings were very rich greens, oranges, and red tints. They were easily recognized. Then in the late ’50s and ’60s, he went back to the water more.My father grew up with water. It’s represented so clearly in his abstraction. It’s probably the most realistic part, the backdrop of the ocean. Virtually every painting is a blue, horizontal body. The greens and oranges segue into each other that became more defined blues, reds, beachy with a very different light. He was definitely very influenced by his natural environment.Do you have a distinct memory of him you could share?He taught at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute three, four days a week, so we would have models come to the studio. And my brother and I would wonder what he does with these women that come into the studio for hours at a time. One day, I went into the studio to see what he was doing after one of them left. On the easel was a big piece of paper with all of these abstract lines that didn’t make any sense. Totally abstract. I thought it was going to be a realistic picture of a reclining woman, but it was just these majestic lines.How would you describe his style?He kept with abstract, quasi-abstract impressionism. Seeing these paintings come in and out of the house and the studio, I had no idea what they were. For years, even after I was told there were clues in those paintings, I would try to figure it out. Finally, at a certain belated age, I would see them. Some a little more obvious than others, such as one on Georgica Beach.Which is your favorite painting?There’s a picture of my father holding me in front of a painting back in 1955. It was called “Spring.” It was very reminiscent of the Catskill Mountains in the spring, all those colors. Perfectly done, very abstracted. There’s a color reproduction in the catalog. That’s my favorite painting. It’s bright, colorful, optimistic. Having taken his first son to a big show, two years running in a stable gallery, he felt good, and it comes through in that painting.The Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center is located at 830 Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton. Learn more at www.pkhouse.org.nicole@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Linde part of landmark on-stream gas facility in China

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Advanced Insulation Present Their Topside and Subsea Insulation (VIDEO)

first_imgAdvanced Insulation, a single source provider for insulation and fire protection systems to the oil & gas industry, has recently released a video showing their topside and subsea insulation.The company specialises in the manufacture and supply of ContraFlame and ContraFlex fire protection and thermal insulation systems designed for upstream oil and gas infrastructures.Advanced Insulation has developed its ContraTherm solutions to meet the need for resilient insulation materials capable of tolerating the temperature and pressure extremes required for high temperature developments.Advanced Insulation specialises in the manufacture and application of unique syntactic phenolic resin based foam insulation and fire protection systems. Advanced Insulation has been awarded twice ‘The Queen’s Award’ for Enterprise under the category of International Trade (2012) and Innovation (2013). This is a highly prestigious award for outstanding achievement by UK businesses in the categories of Innovation, International Trade and Sustainable Development.[mappress]July 8, 2013last_img read more

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VIDEO: Tidal power with Alstom

first_imgAlstom, a French-based technology developer, has released a video showcasing its Oceade tidal platform.Oceade tidal platform allows customers to select various turbines to fit their sites’ specific requirements.Alstom has developed Oceade 18 – 1.4 MW tidal turbine, with an improved design based on the Alstom’s experience with 1 MW tidal stream turbine.It is 18 m in diameter, and 1.4 MW in capacity.Four Oceade 18 – 1.4 MW tidal turbines will be installed at Raz Blanchard pilot tidal farm.With 5.6 MW in total capacity, the tidal turbines will be able to supply power to 15.000 people.The project is slated to begin in 2017 and is expected to operate for a period of 20 years.last_img read more

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