Concepto Tambor And Sol Connection Perform At Secret City Summer Concert At Ashley Pond Pavilion Friday

first_imgConcepto Tambor headlines summer concert Friday night at Ashley Pond Pavilion. Courtesy/FaceBook SUMMER CONCERT News:The 2019 Los Alamos Secret City Summer Concert Series welcomes Concepto Tambor and Sol Connection Friday at Ashley Pond Pavilion for the 10th concert in the 2019 series.Concepto Tambor blends Afro-Latin /Brazilian grooves, hip-hop, a call and response style of singing / ­chanting with a rock-n-roll attitude and energetic performance. The band has shared the stage with internationally known artists such as Lila Downs, Los Mocosos, Buju Banton, Quetzal, John Trudell, War and B Side Players. After becoming one of Albuquerque’s most popular acts, the band moved to Long Beach, Calif. in early 2009, and returned back home to Albuquerque in 2016 with a new worldly flavor.Sol Connection is the opening band performer. Fresh. Fun. Amazing. That’s how the audience describes Sol Connection’s upbeat world music. Danceable originals and a few tasty covers keeps the audience asking for more. Positive crowd response gets the band invited back to play at venues and private parties again and again. The fusion of pop, ska, and Latin beats in a high-energy, positive package is playful and entertaining. Songs in English, Spanish and Portuguese accompanied with accordion, melodic, guitar, bass, drums and percussion make for an engaging, memorable experience. The band sounds like a combination of Talking Heads, Manu Chao, the Police, Annie Lennox and Los Lobos.The Youth Performance for Friday’s concert features Los Alamos Jazz Project.“It’s going to be a night of dancing and fun,” Sancre Productions spokeswoman Monica Griego said. “Sancre Productions is excited to be bring the Latin world fusion sounds of Concepto Tambor and Sol Connection to the 2019 Los Alamos Summer Concert Series Lineup.” As its 10th concert in the series, the Sancre Productions team is working in tandem with various Los Alamos County Departments to ensure public safety, ADA accommodations, free parking and shuttle services and a diverse offering of Food Truck Vendors. The Youth Performance by Los Alamos Jazz Project starts at 6 p.m., Sol Connection will perform at 6:30 p.m. and Concepto Tambor will perform at 8 p.m. The New Mexico Craft Distillery Garden will offer craft cocktails and beer from Rolling Still Distillery Bros., Bathtub Row Brewing Co-Op. and Santa Fe Brewing Company.To learn more about Concepto Tambor visit: www.facebook.com/pg/CONCEPTOTAMBORTo learn more about Sol Connection, visit: www.solconnectionband.comTo learn more about Los Alamos Jazz Project, visit: www.losalamosjazzproject.comConnect with the concert series at: www.SecretCitySummerConcerts.comFind the series on Facebook under @SecretCitySummerConcertSeries and on Instagram using @secretcitysummerconcertseries.last_img read more

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New Mexico’s First Workforce Native American Summit Held With 14 Pueblos And Tribes In Attendance

first_imgThe Summit provided an opportunity for attendees to learn about workforce development programs delivered through Tribes and Pueblos as well as Identify opportunities for engagement and partnership to leverage resources, tools, and funding to increase services and support for Native American job seekers and businesses. NMDWS News: Attendees discussed plans for strategies and actions to improve communication and collaboration, including training for Tribes and Pueblos on NMDWS tools, such as Career Solutions (www.nmcareersolutions.com), Why I Work (www.dws.state.nm.us/whyiwork), and the New Mexico Workforce Connection Online System (www.jobs.state.nm.us). Customized training will also be developed on case management skills, to improve intake, assessment and planning co-enrollment of individuals to fully support individual training plans career readiness and exploration with Native American youth. The customized training will including development of quality internships, work based learning experiences and summer youth employment Inclusion of Native American Programs in State and Local Plans.   The Summit took place Nov. 14 with more than 50 individuals in attendance at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque. Moving forward from this initial summit, Invitations will be extended to include Native American program representation in Local Area Workforce Development Boards. Quarterly informational meetings also will be scheduled that include training on resources and tools. “Governor Lujan Grisham is committed to building an economy that works for everyone,” NMDWS Secretary Bill McCamley said. “The Native American Summit was a pivotal first step in bringing everyone together to discuss workforce needs for our Tribes and Pueblos, and how we can work together to provide the best possible services and resources to job seekers in those communities.” ALBUQUERQUE ― For the first time in the state’s history, the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions (NMDWS) hosted the first Native American Workforce Summit with 14 Pueblos and Tribes in attendance that receive Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) funding. “The summit provided New Mexico’s Nations, Tribes, and Pueblos a great opportunity to come together and learn how to better support Native American job seekers and Native-owned businesses,” IAD Secretary Lynn Trujillo said. “Thank you to Secretary McCamley and the Department of Workforce Solutions for all of the great work they are doing to support and train job seekers and businesses to become self-sufficient and advance their careers.”last_img read more

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Governor Backs Balanced Pension Reform Proposal

first_imgThe Roundhouse in Santa Fe. Photo by Carol A. Clark/ladailypost.com “Change is never easy, but when you are faced with serious bond rating concerns, when you are faced with the collapse of a retirement system so many New Mexicans depend on if the economy faces a downturn, everybody has to step up,” said Sen. George Muñoz, chair of the Investment and Pensions Oversight Committee. “We’ve got to show leadership and compassion to fix the problems we face. The governor’s leadership on this legislation shows she is willing to do what is right and fair and work with the Legislature to get it done.” Key legislative leaders also voiced support for the proposal, which is scheduled to be heard Wednesday at the legislative Investments and Pensions Oversight Committee. “Immediate action is a necessary and crucial step for our financial security and our bond rating,” said Sen. John Arthur Smith, chair of the Senate Finance Committee. “The longer we postpone corrective action, the more painful it becomes.”  SANTA FE – Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham endorsed an essential and equitable public employee pension reform proposal today that accommodates the concerns of current and future state of New Mexico retirees while establishing safeguards against the effects of future economic downturns. In short, the legislation will ensure a sustainable future for the Public Employees Retirement Association.  “Reforming our pension system, making sure it remains one of the best in the United States, requires backbone and shared sacrifice,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “We must be proactive. A kick-the-can-down-the-road approach when we have a multibillion-dollar unfunded liability hanging over employees’ and retirees’ heads is unacceptable. Left unattended, that shortfall will, sooner than later, obligate painful cuts and wreak havoc on future generations of retirees — if we do not come together and act now. The proposed legislation builds upon the sound recommendations of the pension solvency task force, which this year rigorously studied various means of gradually eliminating the state pension system’s $6.6 billion unfunded liability. The proposal will, per the governor’s direction, deliver an increased cost-of-living adjustment to 30 percent of PERA retirees; deliver on the governor’s solvency mandate within 25 years; and make important accommodations for the oldest and most vulnerable retirees. The proposal will ensure a 2.5 percent cost-of-living adjustment, an increase from 2 percent, for retirees over the age of 75 as of July 1, 2020, roughly a third of the state’s public retirees, per the governor’s direction;Exempt from the contemplated changes the most vulnerable groups of retirees: Those over the age of 75 as of July 1, disability retirees and retirees with pensions lower than $25,000 with 25 years of service;Preserve annual cost-of-living adjustments through a new “profit-share” model aligned with investment performance, with COLAs rising as high as 3 percent;Eliminate the 7-year wait period to qualify for cost-of-living adjustments, reverting the wait period to two years;Eliminate the earnings cap of 90 percent;Incrementally increase contributions in a model that shares the burden across active workers and public employers;Delay contribution increases for municipal and county workers for two fiscal years, per the governor’s direction;Provide for incremental decrease in employer contributions as coverage plan funded ratios improve, per the governor’s direction; andAnd allow return-to-work employees such as retired police officers who serve as school resources officers, to receive a COLA, per the governor’s direction.​center_img The state’s pension liability was explicitly noted as a cause for concern by Moody’s Credit Service in its June credit analysis of New Mexico. The draft proposal would immediately reduce the unfunded PERA liability by $700 million and set the state on track to eliminate the liability in its entirety within 25 years.  “I commend the work of the PERA Solvency Task Force,” the governor added, “and I want to thank everyone who contributed their voices and feedback. That input ultimately improved the draft proposal we will introduce for the upcoming legislative session. I wanted to be sure we delivered a fair deal for our retirees and take care of our most vulnerable, and we have done that. I look forward to the collaborative, bipartisan and expedient work of the Legislature in shoring up our retirees’ benefits for the future.” Recognizing the need for reform, the governor in February ordered the creation of a PERA Solvency Task Force, a balanced group of stakeholders tasked with identifying solutions and making recommendations. The work product of the task force has been endorsed by AFSCME Council 18; Communication Workers of America; New Mexico Professional Firefighters Association; Fraternal Order of Police; National Association of Police Officers; and the Albuquerque Fire Department Retirees’ Association. “I applaud Governor Lujan Grisham’s proactive approach to tackling the pension solvency problem and appreciate the work done by the task force,” said Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth. “The proposed solutions are innovative and fair. With shared sacrifice we can strengthen the program for current and future retirees.” From the Office of the GovernorBill will incorporate retiree concerns into task force recommendations “When we began this process, we knew we had a difficult problem to solve: ensuring we keep our pension promises to hard working state employees while still maintaining financial security of the plan and our state,” House Speaker Brian Egolf said. “Our dangerously underfunded pension fund threatens our credit rating today and would have forced us to break promises to employees in the future. The governor, along with the Pension Solvency Task Force, have done what seemed almost impossible: create a plan with broad support that balances solvency with critical needs of families and seniors. With this new plan, we will keep our promises to employees for decades to come. I thank the governor for her outstanding leadership on this complex problem and look forward to helping pass this critical legislation in the upcoming session.” Key components include: “I would like to thank the governor for taking on this important issue and working diligently to resolve the problem of long-term solvency,” said Rep. Patricia Lundstrom, chair of the House Appropriations and Finance Committee. “I support the bill and hope my colleagues will also support it.”last_img read more

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2020 Special Session: Election Changes Pass House

first_imgHouse members pass provisions Saturday night at the Roundhouse meant to help ensure a safe election during the pandemic. File photo By MICHAEL GERSTEINSFNMA scaled-back election overhaul lacking a key provision that would have allowed clerks to mail every registered voter a ballot for the November general election is on its way to Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s desk following a dramatic revote after first failing to pass the House.After three hours of debate, the House rejected Senate Bill 4 in a 38-32 vote Saturday that included many Democrats opposing the measure despite it being a priority of Lujan Grisham and other Democrats. But a subsequent vote to “reconsider” the legislation passed, and after hours of closed-door caucus meetings, a second vote on the legislation cleared the House floor 44-26 without any amendments, rescuing the bill from the legislative graveyard.House Speaker Brian Egolf and other Democratic leaders persuaded fellow Democrats to support legislation they opposed just hours earlier by reminding them of other provisions in the bill that are meant to help ensure a safe election during the pandemic.“We basically decided to [prioritize] a safe election, an election where absentee ballot programs can be meaningfully done without late-arriving ballots, without vendors and processing being such a problem like in the primary we just went through,” Egolf said in an interview after the House adjourned.“It was a very, very high stakes issue,” he added. “The Senate unfortunately was racing to adjourn, and an additional worry was that if we amended the bill and sent it to the Senate … then the bill would be lost.”The temporary election changes would allow clerks to automatically send absentee ballot applications to all registered voters ahead of the presidential election. It also makes other changes supporters say will streamline the next election following mail delays that led to problems with people receiving their ballots and a prolonged delay in election results in Santa Fe County. Many people complained about receiving their ballots so late they had to turn them in last-minute, in person.“That’s something in my opinion we have to do given what we saw in the primary election with absentee ballots,” Senate Majority Leader Peter Wirth, D-Santa Fe, said in an interview after the Senate voted to end its session prior to the House vote.“The changes in there are very important,” he continued. “Addressing the absentee ballot timelines, redoing the way the envelopes work, there’s all kinds of ministerial issues. The big issue that everyone’s focused on is mail ballots by the county clerks, but in the bill is a provision to allow mail ballots if the secretary of health declares an emergency in a certain area and the legislative panel that’s in the bill were to determine that could happen — so it didn’t completely eliminate mail ballots.”But it would not automatically allow clerks to send ballots without first processing an application after Republicans and two Democrats on a key Senate panel stripped the provision from the legislation.Supporters still say the changes, which would cost about $3 million, would bring clarity to the next election and streamline the process.Of particular consternation for some members was a provision that allows independent voters to register at a polling location to vote in a Republican, Libertarian or Democratic primary.The legislation also allows voters to request an absentee ballot sooner, could potentially offer flexibility on the deadline for turning in an absentee ballot and makes other “ministerial” changes that would streamline the election, Wirth said.The bill would repeal automatically at the end of this year, while the primary changes would not in effect be active for 23 months, when the next primary election takes place. But because the measure failed to get two-thirds support in the House, an emergency clause that would have activated the bill immediately upon signature from the governor means that the bill will not take effect until roughly 60 days before the presidential election.Bill co-sponsor Rep. Linda Trujillo, D-Santa Fe, argued on the House floor that the semi-open primary option should be seen as a positive change, making it easier for people to vote.It also requires personal protection equipment for poll workers and other practices meant to ensure safety in a COVID-19 world and authorizes the secretary of the Department of Health to create health requirements specific to certain counties for the election.“Somebody who’s not registered could come in day 27 until Election Day and they can register to vote and declare a party and vote,” Trujillo said. “This is an incredibly temporary provision that is only intended to try to keep elections safe for the general election in November.”Supporters argued that the changes were necessary to prepare for the upcoming election, when COVID-19 may well still be a threat.County clerks from across the state previously asked the New Mexico Supreme Court before the primary election in June to allow them to automatically send ballots to registered primary voters. The court denied their petition.Before the revote, House Republicans attempted to delay the legislation by calling for a vote to send it from the House floor to the House Appropriations and Finance Committee. The vote failed.last_img read more

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Linde provides CO2 solution in Sweden

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Nine AHTS Vessels to Feature Optimarin’s BWT Systems

first_imgNorway-based ballast water treatment (BWT) firm Optimarin has received a contract to provide its ballast systems for nine anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels being built at China’s Sinopacific Shipbuilding Group. The vessels, designed by Sinopacific’s Shanghai Design Associates specialist OSV team, will be operated by ESNAAD, a subsidiary of the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC).Featuring a bollard pull of 80 tonnes, the vessels are designed for offshore work in the Arabian Gulf.All nine vessels of the SPA80A design are scheduled for delivery to ESNAAD before the end of 2017.The contract win comes on the back of a recent ten unit order from Turkish shipping company Atlantis Tankers for two newbuilding and eight existing vessels in the Turkish managed tanker fleet.Optimarin said that the company has already installed more than 270 systems, out of a total of over 370 confirmed orders, in light of the upcoming USCG approval of the company’s BWT system, expected in autumn this year.last_img read more

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Nordana on the move in Spain

first_imgThis applies to the regular ro-ro multi-purpose liner service that Nordana operates between the USA, North Africa and the Mediterranean areas returning to Houston via Venezuela, the Caribbean Islands and Central America / Mexico.Both Valencia port and Sagunto port are within the Port of Valencia authority. This change is being made to accommodate Valencia’s long term plans, whereby multi-purpose cargo is expected to be handled exclusively at Sagunto.”In order to minimize any future inconvenience to our clients or disruption to our service, Nordana is acting now on an operational situation we see as inevitable,” said Steen Obst, vice president, Americas.”In recent years we have steadily increased our focus on non-containerised cargoes. We have previously moved operations from Barcelona to Tarragona, following our strategy of matching the multi-purpose cargo handling skills of our vessels and crew with the same level of skill and expertise in our terminals.”Facilities at Sagunto are scheduled to be continually expanded over the next two years, allowing customers to benefit from better and more economical cargo handling in a port that remains largely without congestion, while being easily accessible to the main traffic corridors to central Spain and the local region of Valencia.The first vessel to call Sagunto will be the MV Skanderborg on January 16, 2010.last_img read more

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LiP’s late email ‘not sufficient’ to justify adjournment

first_imgA ruling from the Court of Appeal underlines the power of judges to dismiss late applications for adjournments which were not properly made.In Alexander v Willow Court Management Company (1985) Ltd, Lady Justice Rafferty (pictured) dismissed a challenge from a former litigant in person who wanted her hearing moved.The judge endorsed a ruling in the lower court which stated that ‘sending an email 24 hours beforehand and simply not turning up is not sufficient’.The appellant, the court heard, had been present during a hearing in Watford in May 2017 where her case was listed for 4 July 2017 in Oxford.On 14 June, she wrote to the Watford court asking that the case be heard either there or in London on medical grounds, enclosing a letter from her GP. She also asked for the hearing to be moved to the end of July to give her time to prepare her case. That letter was stamped as received at Oxford on 28 June.On 3 July, a day before her hearing, she wrote to the court at Oxford repeating her request for an adjournment with the same GP’s letter, saying she had been advised not to travel on her own due to ill health. Rafferty LJTwo emails with similar assertions followed shortly thereafter, along with her explanation that given the lack of a reply to her June letter, she had assumed – wrongly – the court had agreed to her request.At the 4 July hearing, Judge Clarke concluded in Alexander’s absence that she had made no application to adjourn, had sent no one to represent her, and had not supplied medical evidence to explain why she was unable to travel to Oxford. The judge described sending an email 24 hours before a hearing and simply not turning up as insufficient. The appeal court heard that Alexander, who had secured representation by the time of her appeal, criticised the judge for failing to consider an adjournment and for insufficient consideration of the overriding objective.But Lady Justice Rafferty said the appellant faced ‘insuperable difficulties’ in advancing her case, not least because the 14 June letter did not seek an adjournment but a change of venue, and because the GP’s letter did not explain why she could not be present in Oxford.In subsequent emails, she said, no proper grounds for an adjournment were provided. In any case, Judge Clarke enjoyed a ‘wide discretion’ to make a case management decision.last_img read more

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Klaus Deller

first_imgKlaus Deller is returning to Knorr-Bremse AG to replace Dr Michael Buscher as Chairman of the executive board on January 1. Deller first joined the board in 2009 as head of the Commercial Vehicle Systems business unit, before stepping down earlier this year.last_img

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