July 15, 2012 News and Notes

first_img July 15, 2012 News & Notes July 15, 2012 News and Notes News and Notes Jack Bovay of Dean, Mead & Bovay in Gainesville received the Professional Advisor Legacy Award from the Gainesville Community Foundation in partnership with the North Central Florida Estate Planning Council. Grace H. Yang of GrayRobinson in Tampa has been elected to the board of directors for the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of Tampa Bay. Steven D. Manno of Andrews & Manno, P.A., has been nominated for the 2012 Insurance Attorney of the Year from the Florida Insurance Fraud Educational Committee. Jane W. Moscowitz of Moscowitz & Moscowitz in Miami has become a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers. Katherine Earle Yanes of Kynes, Markman & Felman has become president of the Hillsborough Association for Women Lawyers.  Joseph Carey, Jarred Dichek, Betty Marion, and Michael Walsh of Kubicki Draper discussed homeowner insurance claims, fraud, arson, and trends in workers’ compensation at the FIFEC Annual Conference in Orlando. Michael V. Leeman of Fowler White Boggs in Tampa has been elected to the board of trustees of SERVE, which enhances students’ educational experiences by providing community volunteers to support Hillsborough County educators. Christin M. Russell of Kubicki Draper in West Palm Beach presented “Immigration Law Compliance & FLSA/Wage and Hour Compliance” for Sterling Education Services, Inc. Wendy S. Loquasto, of Fox & Loquasto in Tallahassee was a panelist at a program on Practicing Before the First District Court of Appeal. She presented a “Ten-minute Primer” on workers’ compensation appeals. Ronald Scott Kaniuk of Sachs Sax Caplan in Boca Raton spoke on short sales, foreclosure, and bankruptcy at a meeting of the Women’s Council of Realtors Stuart-Martin County Chapter and on “The Intersection of Foreclosure and Bankruptcy Law” at a Palm Beach County Bar Association bankruptcy seminar. Richard Mancini of Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt in Bonita Springs was re-elected to a second term as president of the Foundation for the Developmentally Disabled in Naples. Journey Beard, director of Contract Development and Quality Control for the Palm Beach County Dept. of Economic Sustainability, was inducted into the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame and Museum. Tracey Jaensch of Ford & Harrison in Tampa and chair of the Florida Diversity Council moderated a panel discussion at the inaugural Florida Healthcare Diversity Summit, hosted by Fifth Third Bank, Moffitt Cancer Center, along with the Florida Diversity Council. Steven M. Berman of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa spoke at the University of Florida College of Law Advanced Bankruptcy Seminar. Brad Gould of Dean Mead in Ft. Pierce was elected to the board of governors of the Florida Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Elizabeth Green of Baker Hostetler in Orlando spoke on “Quagmire of Individual Chapter 11 Cases: Lifestyle and Other Issues” at the Central Florida Bankruptcy Law Association meeting. Steven S. Grieco of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa has been elected to the board of directors and as a vice president of the Florida High School Hockey Association, Inc. Gary Farmer, Sr., of counsel to Farmer, Jaffe, Weissing, Edwards, Fistos & Lehrman, discussed “The Effects of the Precedent-setting Mensing & Kendall Decisions” at the National Trial Lawyers Association’s Mass Torts Made Perfect Conference in Las Vegas. Elizabeth Howard of Boyd & Jenerette in Jacksonville has been elected to the board of governors of the Jacksonville Bar Association. David Steinfeld of Palm Beach Gardens has been named as a fellow in the National Trial Lawyer Honor Society, Litigation Counsel of America. Michele Leo Hintson of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Tampa has been appointed to the Junior League of Tampa Board of Directors, serving as chair of the Grants Committee. Keith Grossman of Grossman Law & Conflict Management in Ft. Myers presented a seminar for Lee County mediators on “Preparing for Mediation Ethically.” Brad Edwards of Farmer, Jaffe, Weissing, Edwards, Fistos & Lehrman presented “Maximizing Recovery for Sexual Abuse Victims” as part of SeminarWeb Live!-FJA Webinar and “Enforcing Victims’ Rights” to the Coalition for Independent Living, Inc., as part of the Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center seminar in West Palm Beach. Gregory S. Weiss of Leopold Law in Palm Beach Gardens was sworn in as president of the Martin County Bar Association. Bradley T. Guldalian of Traub, Lieberman, Straus & Shrewsberry in St. Petersburg has been selected to be an adjunct professor at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Riverview. Steve Jaffe of Farmer, Jaffe, Weissing, Edwards, Fistos & Lehrman presented “Current Litigation Trends When Dealing with Denials on Long-term Insurance” at the Private Care Association of Florida’s Best Practices Conferences for Registries in Ft. Lauderdale. Joseph R. Englander of Shutts & Bowen moderated a roundtable at the International Trademark Association Annual Meeting in Washington, D. C. Englander’s group discussed “Cost Benefit Analyses for Trademark and Domain Name Enforcement Actions.” Jude M. Faccidomo of the Law Offices of Jeffrey S. Weiner, P.A., was sworn in as president of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers Miami Chapter. Martin J. Shuham of Shuham & Shuham, P.A., in Hollywood has been elected vice president of governance and a member of the board of directors of the Leadership Broward Foundation. Leora B. Freire of Richman Greer has been elected president of the Palm Beach County Chapter of the Florida Association for Women Lawyers. Allison R. Sabocik and Duane L. Pinnock of Pankauski Law Firm in West Palm Beach presented “Probate Litigation: Hot Topics and Trends” to the Broward County Bar Association. Paul Scheck of Shutts & Bowen in Orlando has been elected president-elect of the Orange County Bar. Slade V. Dukes of St. Petersburg has been appointed to the Florida Consumers’ Council, which advises and assists the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in carrying out its duties. Quentin E. Morgan of Brinkley Morgan in Ft. Lauderdale has been reappointed by the City of Coconut Creek to the City’s Planning and Zoning Board. Patrick D. Coleman of GrayRobinson in Jacksonville has been elected to the Salvation Army’s Advisory Board. Deborah L. Russell of Cummings & Lockwood LLC has become a fellow of the American College of Trust and Estate Counsel. Adria M. Jensen and Hunter G. Norton of Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Sarasota were the featured presenters at the Fourth Annual BBT REO Agent Training Seminar. They discussed post-foreclosure legal issues, including title issues, association disputes, and protecting tenants at Foreclosure Act procedures. Elisha D. Roy of Sasser Cestero & Sasser in West Palm Beach has become a fellow in the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. James Vickaryous of Lake Mary presented “Problem Depositions and How to Deal with Them” to the Seminole County’s Voile Williams, Jr., Inns of Court. Steven G. Paulson, a domestic violence attorney with Dade Legal Aid, was a speaker at the Miami-Dade Pro Bono Summit held in the Miami offices of Akerman Senterfitt to increase awareness of and greater involvement in pro bono..last_img read more

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Why Daydreaming Isn’t a Waste of Time

first_imgKQED Public Radio:Parents and teachers expend a lot of energy getting kids to pay attention, concentrate, and focus on the task in front of them. What adults don’t do, according to University of Southern California education professor Mary Helen Immordino-Yang, is teach children the value of the more diffuse mental activity that characterizes our inner lives: daydreaming, remembering, reflecting.Yet this kind of introspection is crucial to our mental health, to our relationships, and to our emotional and moral development. And it promotes the skill parents and teachers care so much about: the capacity to focus on the world outside our heads.Read the whole story: KQED Public Radio More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Relationship satisfaction depends on the mating pool, study finds

first_imgPinterest Share Relationship satisfaction and the energy devoted to keeping a partner are dependent on how the partner compares with other potential mates, a finding that relates to evolution’s stronghold on modern relationship psychology, according to a study at The University of Texas at Austin.When it comes to mating, people choose partners whose collective qualities most closely reflect what they would prefer in an ideal mate. They prioritize from an array of traits such as intelligence, health, kindness, attractiveness, dependability and financial prospects.UT Austin psychology researcher Daniel Conroy-Beam and his collaborators developed a method to test how mate preferences influence behavior and emotions in relationships in the study “What predicts romantic relationship satisfaction and mate retention intensity: mate preference fulfillment or mate value discrepancies?” in-press in Evolution & Human Behavior. LinkedIn “Few decisions impact fitness more than mate selection, so natural selection has endowed us with a set of powerfully motivating mate preferences,” Conroy-Beam said. “We demonstrate that mate preferences continue to shape our feelings and behaviors within relationships in at least two key ways: by interacting with nuanced emotional systems such as how happy we are with our partner and by influencing how much or little effort we devote to keeping them.”For the study, researchers simulated a mating pool from 119 men and 140 women who had been in relationships for an average of 7½ years. Each participant rated the importance of 27 traits in an ideal mate and the extent to which they felt each trait described both their actual partner and themselves. Researchers then used their new method to calculate each of the participants’ and their partners’ mate value, or desirability within the mating pool as determined by the group’s average ideal preferences.Participants also reported their relationship satisfaction and happiness. The study discovered that satisfaction was not reliably dependent on how a partner compared with a person’s idea of the perfect mate, but rather whether others in the mating pool better matched a person’s ideal preferences.Those with partners more desirable than themselves were satisfied whether or not their partners matched their ideal preferences. But, participants with partners less desirable than themselves were happy with their relationship only if their partner fulfilled their ideal preferences better than most other potential mates in the group, Conroy-Beam said.“Satisfaction and happiness are not as clear cut as we think they are,” Conroy-Beam said. “We do not need ideal partners for relationship bliss. Instead, satisfaction appears to come, in part, from getting the best partner available to us.”In a follow-up study, the researchers again tested relationship satisfaction but also surveyed participants’ mate retention efforts — energy devoted to maintaining their relationships. They found that people with partners difficult to replace, either because their partner was more desirable than themselves or their partner more closely matched their ideal preferences than others in the group, reported being happier and devoted more effort to mate retention. This included making themselves extra attractive for their partners and “mate guarding,” or shielding their partners from mating rivals to help keep their partners, Conroy-Beam said.“Relationship dissatisfaction and mate guarding intensity, in turn, are key processes linked to outcomes such as infidelity and breaking up, both of which can be costly in evolutionary currencies,” said co-author and psychology professor David Buss. “Mate preferences matter beyond initial mate selection, profoundly influencing both relationship dynamics and effort devoted to keeping partners. Mates gained often have to be retained to reap the adaptive rewards inherent in pair-bonding — an evolutionary hallmark of our species.”center_img Email Share on Facebook Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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Naked ambition

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Junctions Swansea park

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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SoFo Holds Open House

first_imgThe South Fork Natural History Museum is hosting a free open house on Saturday, November 24, from 10 AM to 4 PM. From 11 AM until noon, the Shinnecock Nation will offer a blessing and perform traditional dances. Then from 1 to 4 PM, SoFo will present its new shark research interactive exhibit as part of its Shark Research and Education Program.This open house event will also mark the beginning of SoFo’s holiday charity drive to benefit the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation and the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons. Drop off blankets, sheets, towels, new dog and cat toys, or monetary contributions between November 24 and January 2, 2019.Reservations for the open house are preferred, but not required. Call 631-537-9735 or visit www.sofo.org to learn more. Sharelast_img read more

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Minesto to receive $3.8M from its owners

first_imgMinesto’s largest owners BGA Invest and Midroc New Technology will invest additional SEK 34 million ($3.8 million) in the company by exercising all of their warrants held in Minesto.As the subscription period of the warrants ‘Minest TO1’, issued in connection with Minesto’s IPO in November 2015 starts, the two main shareholders BGA Invest and Midroc New Technology have signed newly issued shares corresponding to approximately 41% of the total potential proceeds in the warrants program.In total, Minesto can potentially add approximately SEK 82 million ($9.3 million) in proceeds, should all warrants be exercised, the Swedish tidal energy developer informed.The last day to exercise the warrants is February 28, 2017.Martin Edlund, CEO of Minesto, said: “As active owners, BGA Invest and Midroc New Technology have played a crucial role in Minesto’s development over the years. This commitment reaffirms their belief in the unique Deep Green technology, and underlines their commitment to build a better world through innovative and commercially attractive technology.”The issue price upon exercise of the warrants is SEK 6.30 per share, with the number of outstanding warrants at 26,302,587.Minesto plans to install the 500kW Deep Green tidal power plant off Angelsey in Wales later this year.last_img read more

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No ‘hidden agenda’ in Irish legal reforms

first_imgIreland’s government has denied the existence of any ‘hidden agenda’ behind sweeping reforms to the legal system imposed following the country’s bailout by the International Monetary Fund (IMF). The minister for justice, equality and defence, Alan Shatter (pictured), was responding to growing international concerns, first reported in the Gazette on 1 December, that conditions imposed by financial institutions would undermine the profession’s independence. Bodies representing 1.4 million lawyers in Europe and North America last month warned Christine Lagarde, the IMF’s managing director, of the effect of reforms imposed on European governments following interventions by the so-called ‘troika’ of the IMF, European Central Bank and European Commission. In a joint letter, the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe (CCBE) and the American Bar Association (ABA) expressed ‘great concern’ about the imposition of radical reforms over the past year. The authors highlighted developments in Ireland, where the government last October approved publication of a new Legal Services Regulation Bill which, they say, ‘provides for far-reaching changes and reforms which are unprecedented in Europe and the United States’. Proposed changes include the establishment of a new regulator consisting of 11 members – all appointed by the minister for justice, equality and defence, who can remove any member at any time. The new regulator will have ‘all powers of regulation, including conduct, discipline and complaints-handling’, the letter warned. However, Shatter denied any attempt to compromise legal independence. ‘I do not accept the view that the independence of the new regulatory authority will be fettered, ministerially or otherwise,’ he said. ‘The bill specifically provides, based on precedent elsewhere in legislation, that the authority “shall be independent in the performance of its functions”. There is no hidden agenda in relation to ministerial functions or appointments under the bill.’ Law Society of England and Wales president John Wotton added his voice to concerns that ‘some of the reforms proposed by the Irish government may go too far’. The joint letter went on to refer to reforms in Greece and Portugal, also subject to economic bailouts. These reforms, the letter said, appear to have been ‘developed within a few weeks without taking account of the purpose/justification of professional regulation and without analysing the impact of such proposals on the administration of justice’. The letter closed with an appeal to Lagarde’s personal experience as a partner with international law firm Baker & McKenzie, which ‘no doubt carried important lessons regarding the need for protection of the lawyer-client relationship against intrusion by the state’. The authors, CCBE president Georges-Albert Dal and ABA president Bill Robinson, urged Lagarde to pass their concerns on to the other troika parties and request a face-to-face meeting.last_img read more

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Training for the Olympics

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

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CSA 2020: Ports could revoke scrubber bans

first_imgMembers of the CSA 2020 executive committee presented research to the port authorities that indicated that the wastewater generated by the exhaust gas cleaning process was environmentally acceptable and well within regulatory limits.The organisation said that it has received ‘no objection’ letters from more than 20 ports covering Europe, the Americas, Asia and Australasia.www.cleanshippingalliance2020.orglast_img

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