‘Boom and bust’ cycle of deep-sea trawling unsustainable, study finds

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Green, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Research, Wildlife Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Researchers have built a global picture of deep-sea fish catches from bottom trawling from 1950 to 2015.Deep-sea trawling can be extremely destructive for fish populations, while providing minimal economic benefits, the study found.Researchers also found that large quantities of fish caught in the deep sea go unreported. Fishing in the remote waters of the deep sea isn’t easy. But with technological advancements, fishing boats have pushed farther and deeper into the oceans, frequently using bottom trawl gear — giant fishing nets weighted down with metal attachments that drag along the seafloor — to scoop up huge amounts of fish from depths of up to 2,000 meters (6,560 feet).Deep-sea trawling, however, can be extremely destructive for fish populations, while providing minimal economic benefits, researchers have found. Catches from deep-sea trawling are also grossly underreported, the researchers conclude in a new study published in Frontiers in Marine Science.“Considering that the search for fishable resources, though partly ‘buffered’ by some recent regulatory positions … is progressively moving deeper and deeper, the picture that emerges from this study is definitely worrying,” Antonio Pusceddu, professor of ecology at the University of Cagliari, Italy, who was not involved in the study, told Mongabay.Pacific sleeper shark. Image by NOAA.Bottom-trawling in the deep sea likely unsustainableBetween 1950 and 2015, bottom trawls caught about 25 million tons of 72 fish species at depths greater than 400 meters (1,310 feet), the researchers found. Many of these fisheries followed a “boom and bust” pattern, with fish harvests first thriving, then quickly crashing.This shows that deep-sea bottom-trawled fisheries are not sustainable, lead author Lissette Victorero, a doctoral student at the National Oceanography Centre, U.K., told Mongabay. “Most of them last only a decade or two. Additionally, this cycle is so rapid that the management and the scientific knowledge about the [target] species is lagging. Hence, the fishery is inappropriately regulated and the stock becomes rapidly over-exploited leading to a collapse,” she said.Past research has shown that in the deep sea, fish and other organisms tend to live longer, and grow and reproduce more slowly. This suggests that fisheries could rapidly and indiscriminately overexploit deep-sea species, the researchers say, without giving them sufficient time to bounce back.However, the overall catch from deep-sea bottom-trawled fisheries over the 65-year study period contributed to less than 0.5 percent of global fisheries.“Certain deep-sea fisheries, such as the orange roughy [Hoplostethus atlanticus] in New Zealand, are highly valuable for a very small number of companies, in this case maybe two or three,” said co-author Les Watling, professor of biology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. “But the environmental damage is extensive so we have to wonder whether those few companies should be allowed to benefit when the damage is so severe.”Orange roughy caught in a trawl from off New Zealand. Image by Claire Nouvian/Bloom Association.Deep-sea fish catch data hugely underreportedWhat is particularly alarming, the researchers say, is that large quantities of fish caught in the deep portions of the ocean go unreported.To arrive at their final estimates, the researchers combined information from two sources: marine fish landings officially reported by countries to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) from 1950 to 2015, and a set of estimates for unreported, bycatch and discarded catch data reconstructed by the Sea Around Us project, a research initiative at the University of British Columbia.The study found that the FAO database, which includes only what countries report to the organization, underreported deep-sea, bottom-trawled catch data by about 43 percent. The total fish catch for the study period, according to the FAO database, was 14 million tons. But when combined with the Sea Around Us dataset, the researchers arrived at an estimate of 25 million tons.One reason for this underreporting, Victorero said, is that trawlers end up catching everything in their way, including immature individuals that do not meet the desirable size requirements, or species that have no commercial value. But countries may be reporting only what was kept and landed at the dock, and not what was discarded. In fact, Victorero’s team estimated that deep-sea fisheries discarded some 6 million tons of fish during the study period.The official landings reported to the FAO also do not account for commercially valuable fish that may have been illegally caught outside of existing official quotas, Victorero said.Furthermore, during the earlier days of deep-sea fisheries, the FAO did not require the reporting of many deep-sea species. Without any set quotas, whenever new fisheries were found, there would be a “gold rush” for resources, Victorero said, particularly around seamounts and ridges where many deep-sea fish aggregate to feed and spawn.Imants G. Priede, professor emeritus at the University of Aberdeen, U.K., who was not part of the study, agreed that the underreporting of official data was alarming. “The study clearly shows that the industry has been based on successively depleting one resource after another leaving behind a barren sea floor which may take decades or centuries to recover,” he said.Summit of a seamount in the northwest Atlantic that has been fished with a bottom trawl. Image by NOAA/IFE/URI.Accuracy of fish catch datasetsThe study, however, cautions that even the Sea Around Us datasets might contain uncertainties, which may affect final estimates of unreported fish catch. “The method of estimating [unreported catches] can vary from country to country, so it is possible that the accuracy of the estimates will also vary according to country,” the researchers write in the paper.Divya Karnad, founder of InSeason Fish, an India-based sustainable seafood program, and consultant with the Bay of Bengal Intergovernmental Organization, FAO, illustrated some of the uncertainties using India as an example.The Sea Around Us project’s estimate for unreported catch from India’s small-scale fisheries is based on several assumptions and extrapolations, Karnad said, which is “not the same as having rigorously collected scientific data that allows us to quantify catch from a fishery.”Karnad, who was not involved in the study, added that while the list of deep-sea, bottom-trawled fish species compiled in the study is an important one, it seemed biased toward temperate and polar regions. “Tropical deep water species, such as Bramble sharks, which are landed from India’s deep water fisheries, [are] missing from the list,” she said.Despite the limitations, the researchers write that the FAO data combined with the Sea Around Us reconstructions constitute “the only data compilation available for estimating reported and unreported landings and discards for deep-sea fisheries.”Citation:Victorero, L. et al. (2018). Out of Sight, But Within Reach: A Global History of Bottom-Trawled Deep-Sea Fisheries From >400 m Depth. Frontiers in Marine Science. doi: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00098center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

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Dalton Myers | Cricket – still a man’s game – A cry for equality

first_img Additionally, the report suggested that remuneration is low and there’s a lack of basic rights and protections for women cricketers. Despite the successful implementation of women’s T20 leagues, some cricketers still struggle to survive on the remuneration from playing in these leagues as well as the benefits under their respective central contracts. This has caused many women not to continue playing the sport. Importantly, the report also identified gender inequality as a main issue for women’s cricket. This was the central theme of the report, as many players believe that there is inequality in terms of treatment, opportunities and investment in them as a team or as individuals. Finally, the report suggested that there is a need to have more women involved in the game as administrators, coaches and support staff. This, it argued, would help with identifying with the needs of female cricketers and pushing related policies that seek to address these needs. The issues facing the Windies women are not dissimilar to these of other cricketing nations with maybe Australia and England considered to have organised women’s cricket structures. While there have been improvements in cricket in the Caribbean with an increase in the number of women on retainer contracts to approximately 14, there are still issues facing the Caribbean team that hinder the development of the game at the youth level. This is especially because the territorial boards do not make enough investments in the teams locally. The 2018 report indicated that the treatment of women’s cricket including the West Indies team, has improved but falls short of some of the expectations of a team that can provide an avenue for professional career development. I think the report is spot on with much of the observations in the Caribbean but could have delved more into the sociopolitical issues surrounding cricket in the West Indies that would also affect the women’s sport. Additionally, it falls short in identifying cultural issues such as agents of socialisation (church, media, school) that have been placing women’s sport in general on the backburner. So, while the consumption of sport is supposed to be market-driven, that is not the case as agents such as the media pay little attention to women’s sport, especially in a space that is driven by patriarchy and hegemonic masculinity. I think the report is a start, though, and will help to push some of the discussions on women and cricket. I hope for the next report there will be more discussions about barriers to entry for women who want to be part of the administration of cricket as well as the lack of support from Governments in supporting women’s sport – in this case, cricket. I do agree that there have been significant improvements in the administration and structure of women cricket, but more drastic improvements are needed. – Dalton Myers is a sports consultant and administrator. Email feedback to daltonsmyers@gmail.com The ICC Women’s World T20 is set to begin in about two weeks in the Caribbean. The Stafanie Taylor-led Windies Women are gearing up to defend the title they won in 2016 in England. It is against this backdrop that we are now encouraged to examine gender equity and sport. Earlier this week, the Federation of International Cricket Associations (FICA) released its 2018 Women’s Global Employment Market Report and Survey. The results are geared towards fostering a better understanding of the game of cricket and women’s employment, and further identified twenty (20) key findings. I will focus on five of them. Firstly, the report found that there has been significant progress for women’s cricket, but there’s still more work to be done. Over the past 2-3 years, there has been the successful hosting of international women’s cricket competitions, as well as negotiations of central contracts for women. It is important to see the women’s games as a profession rather than an amateur pursuit. Secondly, the report argued that most of the cricketing nations lacked a professional structure for women’s cricket. A professional set-up would include a very structured women’s domestic league that facilitates honing the skills of cricketers and assisting with talent identification. Such structures help players see a career pathway for success. Without them, there is a challenge in showing female players how they can benefit financially from sports. Low remunerationlast_img read more

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Spillover…

first_img…from VenezuelaTo the maxim, “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again”, the famous American wit WC Field added tersely, “…then quit. There’s no point being a damn fool about it!” But obviously when it comes to effecting regime change in Venezuela, the present crop of American leaders don’t think that much about Fields. Starting from their first coup attempt against Chavez in 2002 they’ve stuck to their guns (pun intended!) and shown they’ll leave no stone unturned to control the largest oil reserves in the world.Now don’t get your Eyewitness wrong. The folks in Africa say whether the elephants are making love or fighting, the grass still gets it in the end. In more ways than one. And when it comes to Venezuela and the US we are GRASS! The bottom line is, there’s absolutely nothing Guyana can do about what’s playing out on our western border. Last time we tried, Jagan was Premier, Castro was busy exporting revolution to Venezuela after the 1961 Bay of Pigs humiliation of the US, and look where it got him. Or more importantly, where it got us!The irony is, in the last go around we became strategically more important than the speck on the globe we are, just because of our proximity to Venezuela, which was firmly in the US camp. Supplying oil and iron ore and such like. The Venezuelan government was only too willing to raise the border controversy gambit in case the British lost their nerve to finagle out Jagan electorally. The Americans always thought the British had a soft spot for Jagan.Today, the shoe’s on the other foot. We’ve gotten strategic notice because the US’ old friends were ousted by Chavez and company and maybe, just maybe, we can be of some use in case the economic crisis and the Opposition’s capture of Parliament doesn’t result in Maduro’s fall and get them back in office. Incidentally, if the Chavistas were rigging all the elections they won before, did they rig the Opposition to win?But while there isn’t much we can do, we ought to know what might be in store for us with regime change. First there will be some 40,000 Guyanese-Venezuelan refugees heading back to Essequibo. Secondly, the right-wingers who’ll take over will push that border controversy to the top of their agenda – to bring the disaffected Chavistas into their nationalist line.Either way, things aren’t looking so rosy for us when we look westwards. And with the left in trouble in Brazil and the rest of South America, we might as well cozy up to the Americans.…from confused overseas GuyaneseThis Eyewitness has a soft spot for his brothers and sisters in the Diaspora. Hey… without their remittances imagine what’ll happen to us! Especially since Minister of Finance Winston Jordan warned us of the economy collapsing now that drug smugglers are on the run. We’d be reduced to eating rice flour from all the rice we can’t sell.In fact there’s this “Overseas Guyanese” Mike (hereinafter OG Mike) who did advise us to start eating rice flour when we first lost that Venezuelan rice market. The fella’s always thinking of his homeland (he’s from Leguan, he informed us). But we’d really like him to pay closer attention to the news from back home.In OG Mike’s latest letter to the press, he worried about pensioners because of NIS money invested in the Berbice Bridge. Blamed all the “owners” of the bridge for getting “guaranteed” returns.He should know that NIS has “preferred shares” – that gets “dividends” BEFORE the common stock shareholders!Who haven’t received a dime since the bridge opened!….from solving cold caseThe best news this Eyewitness has received since all the hoopla about Jubilee Independence is cracking the Babita Sarjou case. Let’s give a big shout out to that determined Mom, the social worker.And, yes, the police!last_img read more

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Guyana’s real “third force”

first_imgBy Ryhaan ShahThe idea of a “third force” that would act as a balance of power between the two major political parties, the PPP and PNC, is still being floated as the best way to help us transcend ethnic politics and graduate to a national issue-based agenda. The feeling is that this would introduce the kind of political maturity needed for progress.However, despite the appearance of several new political parties over the years and the emergence of two coalition governments formed by the PNC with one respective “third force”, the UF and now the AFC, the “third force” idea has failed to deliver.The Burnham Government’s coalition with the UF lasted little over two years and, despite all the protestations from the AFC leadership, it is evident that the current coalition is in tatters. In both instances, it appears that the PNC simply used the “third force” to leverage itself into power.The emergence of the WPA under the leadership of Dr Walter Rodney did present a formidable third force alternative to the Burnham dictatorship and what was seen as an ineffectual PPP opposition and we all know how tragically that story ended.The unresolved issues arising from Guyana’s recent political history continue to paralyse the electorate into the tried and true patterns of ethnic voting, so, while third force parties come and go, the two behemoths are still standing.Notwithstanding the continued efforts to break this mould, there has always been a third force at work in Guyana’s politics. We know them as the ABC countries: America, Britain and Canada.Canada might not have much standing as a world power but they have a keen interest in Guyana’s domestic affairs since they provide much aid to the country and continue to welcome Guyanese immigrants to their shores.More than any political group, it is this third force that continues to determine Guyana’s political fate. In every sense, colonialism never ended; it just changed colours to suit our supposedly independent status. Our dependence on aid and the goodwill of the world powers make us vulnerable to their interests. We are hardly in charge of our destiny.The story of how Premier Cheddi Jagan was ousted from office in the 1960s through CIA-funded violence is well documented as is the resultant destruction from near three decades of a PNC dictatorship. But that was just so much collateral damage in the West’s Cold War with Russia.The US did invest much in restoring democracy to Guyana in 1992 after the Cold War ended and we must hope that America and its allies would not want to squander that investment and the gains made by having Guyana slide back into economic stagnation and even more political turmoil.It is no secret that the US and its allies helped forge the current alliance between the PNC and AFC. That they worked to create the partnership certainly gave them a vested interest in the Coalition’s success at the polls and many still hold the results of the last general elections suspect.However, the diplomatic community must be disappointed, as is every single Guyanese, with the conduct of the Coalition Government as we all watch the serial corruptions unfold and the economy grind to a halt. They cannot be at all happy with this outcome.The PPP/C in its 23-year reign did, however, give everyone good reason to want change. They had become arrogant and were seen as corrupt, and it was probably out of a bloated sense of inviolability that they felt untouchable. Their infamous “feral blast” probably sealed their fate.For the sake of their future success, the PPP/C must throw off the gauche and even uncouth behaviour that marred their past efforts at diplomacy and seek some guidance in gaining good diplomatic skills.Practising the art of diplomacy is not weakness and any good government must be able to walk the fine line between honouring Guyana’s sovereignty and being cognizant of the interests of the diplomatic community especially if Guyana is to benefit from both Western and Asian investments.In Guyana’s racially divided state, it is probably good to have a third force in effect that would help check the excesses of power of any one side.Whereas the ABC countries were openly critical of the PPP/C Administration, the Granger Government’s continued bumbling incompetence and wanton wastage of state funds have drawn no fire although any assurances of their continuance in government would surely have been reassessed by now.Given this scenario, the PPP/C must be aware that their diplomatic skills – or lack thereof – could well determine their future.last_img read more

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Social cohesion – Govt’s disingenuous intention?

first_imgUpon taking office in May 2015, the APNU/AFC coalition government immediately established the Ministry of Social Cohesion (MoSC). It seemed a substantive entity and was initially headed by a long-serving, strong-armed member of the People’s National Congress (PNC), the largest Party in the coalition and, in reality, the Government.Many welcomed it, and given its perceived role, was seen as vital to the building, or rebuilding, of unity among Guyanese. This was on the heels of an apparent divisive elections, in which the coalition acceded to power by less than five thousand votes; seemingly less than what was required for a seat in the National Assembly.Despite some crossover voting to the two major political parties, both with solid ethnically-based support, the results of the May 2015 elections may have also revealed a voting pattern generally along an ethnic line.That may have rendered the establishment of the MoSC more relevant, especially when the Ethnic Relations Commission (ERC), was not constituted since 2011. Expectations of the MoSC were, therefore, naturally high, as Guyanese in general, desire genuine efforts to help heal the divide. In addition, a sense of belief was created that the APNU/AFC Government was serious of genuinely working towards building national unity.The fact that a Ministry was actually established and would receive a budgetary allocation, its intention would have been difficult to doubt. Therefore, the idea of a sustained national effort within the context envisaged, must be lauded. However, unfortunately, or unsurprising to some, the MoSC has seemingly failed to deliver what is believed to be its mandate.For one, its importance seems to have been reduced following what appears as a downgrading from a standalone Ministry to that of a Department within the Ministry of the Presidency. That aside, gauging from many of its public events, it seems as if the now Department of Social Cohesion (DoSC) is more occupied with providing handouts in areas believed to be supportive of the coalition or those in which such actions can help to coerce voters in its favour.With more than four years since its establishment, an argument could be made that nothing tangible within the realms of forging unity has been achieved despite the hundreds of millions of taxpayers’ dollars spent, assumedly, for that purpose. This seeming lack of expected results could be as a result of the actions of the APNU/AFC coalition itself.Almost immediately upon taking office, it began what was seen as a witch-hunt against many public servants who were, by in large, of one particular ethnic group and who were suspected of being supportive of the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) Administration.If that was not enough, numerous forensic audits were seemingly used as mechanisms to disparage and discard trained professionals. They were replaced reportedly by Government supporters believed to be less skilled and overwhelmingly, from one particular ethnic group— a group seen as the support base of the PNC.Those actions were described as political vendetta and wholesale cleansing of one particular group of Guyanese. It didn’t end there, for a number of them were charged and placed before the courts. Those charges were described as trumped-up with the sole intention to embarrass.Over the past four years, records would show that the APNU/AFC Government fired and thereby caused thousands of Guyanese to be deprived of their livelihoods. That includes some two thousand Indigenous citizens and thousands of sugar workers. In addition, as a result of its poor fiscal policies, some industries and businesses were forced to be closed causing many workers to be unemployed.Those said fiscal policies also resulted in a plethora of new and burdensome taxes to be unleashed on ordinary Guyanese. Vendors’ licences and rental for farmlands were also vastly increased bringing further hardships to the citizenry.With many embarrassed and with thousands humiliated by being fired and made incapable of providing for their families, the priority focus would be to survive. That, in itself, would more than likely evoke resentment of the Government.With such unavoidable resentment resulting from APNU/AFC’s highhandedness, it therefore becomes virtually impossible for the said Government, under the guise of the DoSC, to even contemplate any semblance of success for social cohesion. In other words, the Government seemingly divides the nation while at the same time appearing to wanting to build unity.It’s hypocritical and insults intelligence. This is compounded by the Department seemingly prioritising its focus in the coalition’s strongholds and reportedly engaging in coercion for support in others. While the DoSC might have done some work in relation to its intended mandate, its overall achievement within that said context remains far from desired.APNU/AFC’s disregard for the Constitution since December 2018 has continued to widen the division and exacerbate resentment. With that disrespect ongoing and with no indication of the DoSC instituting that necessary paradigm shift, its existence would remain questionable, seen as a medium for mass mobilisation for the coalition and disingenuous to the point of a failed promise; probably one never intended.last_img read more

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‘Vote for Passionate Leader’

first_img“If you put old wine in a new bottle, it will burst,” said Nimba County Senator Prince Y. Johnson in his remarks on July 23, during the dedicatory ceremony of the medical center built by Representative Jeremiah Koung in Ganta.Senator Johnson, who was specific in his approach, urged the citizens of Nimba to “shine their eyes” and vote for someone who has a passion for Liberia.He said there are many who are coming to contest the 2017 general elections, but may not have the passion for the country, therefore it is time that the citizens make a sound decision by “shining their eyes” to elect the right person.Senator Johnson further noted that peace is the path to development and without peace there would be no development.“The good developments we are carrying on are because of the peace we are enjoying today,” he added.The dedicatory program held in Ganta was attended by government officials, including Vice Present Joseph N Boakai, Speaker Alex Tyler, Senator Jewel Howard Taylor, Minister of Internal Affairs, Minister of Education as well as officials from Nimba County and beyond.Senator Johnson, who was very candid in his remarks, said Liberia has been exploited for over a century, with several mines in Liberia depleted, including Bomi Hill, Mano River Mountain, Bong Mines, to name a few.He did not squarely name any former leader for being responsible for Liberia’s exploitation, but admonished the citizens to “shine their eyes.”Nimba County remains one of the battlegrounds for those who will be seeking for the nation’s highest position, the presidency.Nearly all those bidding for the presidency, including VP Boakai, Cllr. Brumskine, Dr. Mills Jones, Mr. Alex Cummings, among others, are fighting very hard to win the minds of the citizens by frequently visiting the voter rich county and making donations to institutions as well as to some opinion leaders.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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DONE DEAL! Sunderland confirm permanent signing of Liverpool striker Fabio Borini

first_img New Sunderland signing Fabio Borini Sunderland have announced the signing of striker Fabio Borini from Liverpool in a deal reportedly worth up to £10million.The Black Cats have finally concluded their long pursuit of the 24-year-old, who spent the 2013/14 season on loan at the Stadium of Light, with the player penning a four-year deal with the club for an undisclosed fee understood to be £8m, with a further £2m in add-ons.Borini was a hit during his previous season stay on Wearside, with his goals proving crucial in their narrow escape from Premier League relegation, as well as a run to the League Cup final that season.He had the option to make his loan move permanent at the end of that campaign, but turned that, plus an offer from Queens Park Rangers, down in favour of proving himself at Anfield.However, having made just 18 appearances for the Reds last season, he failed to force his way into Brendan Rodgers’ long-term plans and decided to call time on his stint on Merseyside.Borini’s capture was confirmed by Sunderland on Monday afternoon.A club statement read:”Sunderland are delighted to announce the signing of Fabio Borini from Liverpool for an undisclosed fee.“The 24-year-old has signed a four-year deal at the Stadium of Light and returns to the club following a successful loan spell during the 2013-14 season, during which he became a fan favourite with ten goals including strikes against Newcastle United, Chelsea and at Wembley during the Capital One Cup final.” 1last_img read more

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No club rules, dues to state your views

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre It’s called the Gladden Group and it’s going into its 67th year in Glendale stronger than ever. It’s not losing members; it’s gaining them. “We have a wealth of gray hair, a mellow point of view, but still definite opinions on most topics, which makes for some spirited discussions,” says Harold Singer, who’s been in the Gladden Group for over 40 years. He’s never been president because there is no president. There are no officers at all. It was started in 1940 by Glendale civic leader John Gladden, who wanted some of the men in town to get together for lunch a couple times a month, smoke cigars and throw their local, national and world opinions around the table. They met at the old Verdugo Club, which didn’t allow women members at the time. Big mistake. Odds and ends from around the Valley: I’ve finally found a club Groucho Marx would join. There are no dues or rules. No topic is too bizarre to be discussed, no opinion too far out to be considered. Members have 10 minutes each to lay their ideas and arguments on the table, and everyone has five minutes to rip them apart or agree. “We finally moved out of there because how are you going to have fresh ideas and good arguments unless there are women around?” Harold said. Exactly. He figures they’ve argued over 1,500 topics and never repeated one. If any member feels the need to be nostalgic, they’re given five minutes before the heavy discussions begin to get it out of their system. Mideast oil, education reform and L.A. congestion trump the good old days in the Gladden Group. To join, give Harold a call at 323-849-4323. Kudos to the men and women at Canoga Park Elks Lodge 2190 for recently delivering more than $900 worth of supplies and clothes to the veterans over at the Sepulveda VA Care Center. This comes on the heels of the club’s 14th annual Police and Firefighters Appreciation Night. The honorees from the LAPD this year were Sgt. James Leiphardt, and Officers Esteban Olivares, Kenneth Hoover, Teresa Lincoln and Sean Dinse. From the Los Angeles city and county fire departments were Capt. Greg Peters and Firefighters Roger Fowble, Jeff Staden, Kenneth Bunch and Scott Rosefeld. Also, Deputy Jon Yip from the Lost Hills Sheriff’s Station, and Officer Carlos Saantander from the Woodland Hills California Highway Patrol office were honored. The Woodland Hills Rotary Club held its annual Protector Award luncheon this week, honoring LAPD West Valley police Officer Ray Diaz, Los Angeles city Firefighter Jay Ceasar, CHP Officer Thomas Roman and Los Angeles County sheriff’s Deputy Pat May. Our local American Legion Ladies Auxiliary has started a penny drive through March to raise funds for veterans with mental disabilities and USO programs. “Donation jars have been placed in all American Legion posts, and we are also clipping coupons to be sent to the USO and military bases for use by our troops,” said Ann Philcox, local president of the American Legion Ladies Auxiliary. If you want to help the ladies out with some pennies and coupons, give Ann a call at 818-901-9502. And finally, Southern California Easter Seals has opened a Pacoima Center to offer vital services to local adults with disabilities. There are employment services, adult day care and independent and supported living services available at the center, 12510 Van Nuys Blvd., No. 107. For more information, call Bathsheba Dorsey or Cynthia Fernandez at 818-996-9902, or go online to www.southerncal.easterseals.com. Dennis McCarthy’s column appears Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday. dennis.mccarthy@dailynews.com, 818-713-3749160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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GM and Ford alliance talks ultimately stalled

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John Phillips Still, the fact that GM and Ford fierce domestic competitors for decades would consider teaming up on business matters illustrates the changing landscape of the U.S. industry. While Asian automakers are building new factories and boosting sales, GM and Ford are slashing jobs and vehicle production to match their shrinking market shares. GM was also thrust in July into alliance talks with Renault SA of France and Nissan Motor Co. of Japan. The talks, which are expected to conclude in October, were initiated by one of GM’s largest shareholders, billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian. With potential global deals on the table and competition at a fever pitch, it’s not surprising that Detroit’s Big Two automakers would at least explore cooperative ventures that could save them money, said one industry analyst. “I think they have looked at a lot of things, but that doesn’t mean they pursue them,” said David Cole of the Center for Automotive Research in Ann Arbor. “But they’re always looking.” The volatile conditions in the American auto industry led Ford Motor Co. to briefly discuss a possible alliance with rival General Motors Corp. in July. But after an initial meeting between the chief financial officers of GM and Ford, both companies dropped the notion of cooperating in areas such as purchasing and human resources. Both GM and Ford declined comment Monday on an article in the trade journal Automotive News that said the two companies discussed a merger or alliance. However, sources at the two automakers downplayed the level of the discussions and said no talks are ongoing or planned in the future. The July discussions were initiated by Ford as part of the company’s intensive internal review of its struggling North American operations, according to people familiar with the situation. According to those people, Ford approached GM in July about possibly linking up in the areas of purchasing, information technology and human resources. The initial contact was followed by a meeting between the two companies’ CFOs Fritz Henderson of GM and Ford’s Don Leclair. However, nothing came out of the discussion, according to people at both companies who spoke on condition of anonymity. The discussions preceded Ford’s hiring of Alan Mulally as its president and CEO two weeks ago. Ford declined to comment publicly on the matter. “My job is to keep everybody focused on our Way Forward (restructuring) plan and accelerating our results,” Mark Fields, Ford’s president of the Americas, told The Associated Press on Monday. “If we discussed all the speculation that was out there, I think we’d probably spend a couple of days.” A GM spokesman said Monday that discussions between GM and other automakers are not unusual events. “As we have said on many occasions, we often have conversations with other automakers to discuss issues of mutual interest,” Tony Cervone of GM said. “As a policy, we don’t confirm or comment on these discussions which, in many cases, never lead anywhere.” Ford Executive Chairman Bill Ford Jr. also has spoken with Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Renault and Nissan, in recent months to keep the door open to possible cooperation in the future should nothing materialize from the GM-Renault-Nissan talks, according to people familiar with the situation. Wall Street showed little reaction to reports of the GM-Ford talks. In trading Monday on the New York Stock Exchange, GM shares closed at $31.48, down 18 cents, and Ford shares closed at $7.82, down 20 cents.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Things to Do

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John PhillipsFamily Nature Walk, 11 a.m.-noon, and an animal presentation, 1-2 p.m., every Saturday at Placerita Canyon Park and Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. SCV Rose Society 13th annual Rose Show, 12:30 p.m. today at the Castaic Union School District, 28131 Livingston Ave., Valencia. Call Kitty Belendez at (661) 296-5033. “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” will be presented, 1 p.m. Saturdays and 6:30 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 28 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $11-$14 for adults and $9-$11 for students and seniors. Call (661) 799-2702. Scary Movie Night for individuals with mental diabilities, 6:30-9 today at the LETMESAIL Lifestyle Enrichment Center, 28304 Constellation Road, Valencia. Call (661) 702-8555. Grateful Dudes will perform bluegrass music, 7:30-10:30 p.m. every Saturday at Vincenzo’s, 24504 1/2 Lyons Ave., Newhall. Call (661) 259-6733. “Terror By Gaslight” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 1 p.m. Sundays (except Oct. 22) through Oct. 28 at the Canyon Theatre Guild, 24242 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $11-$14 for adults and $9-$11 for students and seniors. Call (661) 799-2702. “Proof” will be presented, 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 28 at the Repertory East Playhouse, 24266 San Fernando Road, Newhall. Tickets: $16 for adults and $14 for students and seniors. Call (661) 288-0000. Share Life will give people the opportunity to donate blood to Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles and/or food and toiletry items to the Hunger Defense Fund, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday at La Mesa Junior High, 26623 May Way, Canyon Country. Sponsored by Heart of the Canyons Church. Call (661) 255-7246, Ext. 510. Bow Wows & Meows Pet Fair will feature dogs and cats available for adoption and pet-related vendors and information booths, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday at William S. Hart Park 24151 N. San Fernando Road, Newhall.Call (661) 297-5961 or visit www.bowwowsandmeows.org. Ranger-led nature hike, 11 a.m. the second, third and fourth Sundays of each month at Vasquez Rocks Natural Area, 10700 W. Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce. Call (661) 268-0840. Taco-A-Thon will benefit Campus After Dark, noon-3 p.m. Sunday at the home of Jerry and Leah Randall, 30431 Star Canyon Road, Castaic. Call (661) 373-4073 or visit www.campusafterdark.org. Songs and Folktales from Around the World will feature music, puppetry and magic tricks, 2 p.m. Sunday at the Valencia Library, 23743 W. Valencia Blvd., Valencia. Call (661) 259-8942.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Lombardi Ranch is open to the public, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays at 29527 Bouquet Canyon Road, Saugus. Call (661) 296-8697. Home and Business Expo, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday in the parking lot at College of the Canyons, 26455 Rockwell Canyon Road, Valencia. Call Heather Sarge at (661) 702-6977. Bird Walk, 9-11 a.m. today at Placerita Canyon Nature Center, 19152 Placerita Canyon Road, Newhall. Call (661) 259-7721. Tesoro Adobe Historic Park is open to the public, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. every Saturday with guided tours of the Harry Carey/Farmer John Ranch House, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Call (661) 702-8953. last_img read more

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