Ontario to review mortgage act

James Langton Equifax launches model to assess near-prime borrowers Mortgage Alliance allows consumers to self-select their own terms, privileges and rates The government says that the review, which will include public consultations, “will focus on ways to strengthen the already substantial consumer protection provisions in the act.” The consultations are expected to begin in late summer, and final recommendations are to be submitted to the Ministry of Finance by early 2014. Securities legislation is long overdue for its own five-year review, with the final report of the most recent review delivered back in 2003. In response to a legislative committee recommendation, the government at the time promised to commission the next review by 2007, but that still hasn’t happened. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The Ontario government has announced its first-ever five-year review of the legislation governing mortgage brokers. Finance minister Charles Sousa Friday announced that he has appointed parliamentary assistant, Steven Del Duca, to lead the first five-year review of the Mortgage Brokerages, Lenders and Administrators Act. Keywords Mortgage brokers Mortgage Alliance introduces SmartMortgage Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

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U.S. proxy voting system too complex: report

first_img ISS unveils proxy voting guidelines for 2020 Facebook LinkedIn Twitter A new report finds that the proxy voting system in the U.S. is too complex, and it calls for reforms to make voting more accurate and transparent. The Securities Transfer Association (STA) released a report Tuesday that examines industry efforts to improve the proxy voting system in the U.S.It notes that an industry-led working group has helped develop new communications portals and share reconciliation procedures designed to improve the accuracy of shareholder votes. However, it also concludes that the system is still too complicated, and it suggests that more substantive reforms are necessary to make proxy voting more transparent and accurate. Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Proxy voting center_img ISS to boost Canadian board diversity benchmarks “While progress has clearly been accomplished in providing investors with the ability to receive electronic confirmation that their votes were cast as directed, more work needs to be done,” the report says. “The end result of vote confirmation cannot be accomplished with complete accuracy until other proxy voting issues within the street name system are addressed.” According to the report, the most important of issues involve reconciliation of the entitlement of each investor to vote a share position as of the record date. It says that reconciliation needs to occur at both the nominee level and at the beneficial owner level. And, it suggests that the proxy voting system would be improved “through reconciliation of the vote entitlement at the beneficial owner level before a proxy distribution is made. This reconciliation would determine eligible voters and share positions in a uniform manner for broker-dealers and banks holding street name shares.” At the same time, the STA says that reconciliation at the nominee level needs equal attention “to ensure that all of a nominee’s shares entitled to be voted have been accounted for.” The STA also says that it believes that as many processing tasks as possible should be standardized and automated, to limit the amount of manual processing required. And, longer term, the report suggests that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) should also move to “simplify the system by adopting substantive reforms to make proxy voting more transparent and to ensure a higher level of accuracy in the vote count.” Canadian regulators have been grappling with many of these same issues. Earlier this year, the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) held a roundtable to examine issues such as improving vote reconciliation, and adopting end-to-end vote confirmation. That session followed a consultation paper issued last year by the CSA on proxy voting issues in Canada. CIBC chief executive Victor Dodig compensation down last year compared with 2018 James Langton last_img read more

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CU Boulder named Tree Campus USA for 8th year in a row

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: March 16, 2018 CU Boulder has been honored by the Arbor Day Foundation as a Tree Campus USA for the eighth year in a row.The campus is home to more than 3,500 cultivated trees, not to mention several thousand more along the Boulder Creek corridor and in other natural areas. The inventory includes more than 100 species, including 14 of the roughly 24 species native to the state.CU Boulder tree factsFull-time arborists: 4Number of cultivated trees on campus: 3,534 at last count, not to mention thousands more non-cultivated trees along the Boulder Creek corridor and other natural areas on campusNumber of tree species: 104Number of species native to Colorado: 14 (out of about 24 that are native to the state)Most-prevalent evergreen species: Colorado blue spruce (Picea), our state treeMost-prevalent deciduous species: Ash (Fraxinus)Biggest (and oldest) tree on campus: Plains Cottonwood on the south side of Old Main; stands 110 feet tall and dates back to 1879 or 1880Years with Tree Campus USA designation: 8Tree Campus USA is an Arbor Day Foundation program launched in 2008 to honor colleges and universities for effective campus forest management and for engaging employees and students in conservation goals. Schools must meet five criteria to qualify for the honor, including maintaining a tree advisory committee, having a campus tree-care plan, dedicating annual expenditures for the tree-care program, conducting an annual Arbor Day observance and sponsoring student service-learning projects.In addition to outreach with various academic programs on campus, CU Boulder Arboriculture Manager Vince Aquino and his team will work with the Student Association of Landscape Architects (SALA) for the fourth year in a row this year to recognize Arbor Day. The annual project entails the arboriculture team and Campus Landscape Architect Richelle Reilly consulting with SALA members as they work through the process of designing a landscape area on campus.The project culminates with the group’s planting of three to five trees around Arbor Day in April, along with a visit from a state forest service representative who presents the campus with its formal Tree Campus USA recognition.“The Tree Campus USA recognition is a testament to the value our campus community places on its trees,” Aquino said. “We’re grateful for the support the campus provides for our tree programs, as well as for the work of our Tree Campus USA committee, which includes students, faculty, staff and community members.”The Arbor Day Foundation has helped campuses throughout the country plant thousands of trees, with Tree Campus USA colleges and universities investing more than $48 million in campus forest management last year. More information about the program is available at the Arbor Day Foundation website.center_img Categories:Deadlines & AnnouncementsSustainabilityCampus Communitylast_img read more

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Compromise in an era of party polarization: A lecture on Oct. 10

first_imgNo recording availableClick here to download presentation slidesOctober 10, 2020 • 1–2:30 p.m.Professor Jennifer Wolak, Political ScienceAmericans are deeply divided along partisan lines. The disagreements between Democrats and Republicans are not just ideological, but also social. Friends are unfriended on social media for their political rants. Political arguments threaten the harmony of Thanksgiving gatherings. The partisan divides among Americans are thought to fuel gridlock in Washington, as elected officials resist making concessions and hold the party line. How can democracy survive in a time of party polarization?In this lecture, Wolak will discuss how that in contrast to the conventional wisdom, Americans want politicians to work together to find compromises. Even if they disagree about partisan priorities, most Americans prefer elected officials who will make compromises to those who stand firm to their ideological convictions.Find out more about Wolak’s researchAbout the presenterJennifer Wolak is a professor of political science who studies public opinion and political behavior in the United States. Her research interests include the development of political attitudes, the character of partisan reasoning, and the ways people think about government. She is the author of Compromise in an Age of Party Polarization. Wolak received her doctorate in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2004. To find out more, visit Wolak’s website. Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

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Broderick calls for Proactive Energy Efficiency

first_imgRelatedBroderick calls for Proactive Energy Efficiency Broderick calls for Proactive Energy Efficiency TechnologyJuly 20, 2011 RelatedBroderick calls for Proactive Energy Efficiency Advertisements RelatedBroderick calls for Proactive Energy Efficiency By O. RODGER HUTCHINSON, JIS Information Officer FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail KINGSTON — Minister of State in the Ministry of Energy and Mining, the Hon Laurence Broderick, has called on Jamaicans to place greater emphasis on energy efficiency and conservation to assist the country in reducing the national energy bill. Speaking at a recent JIS Think tank, Mr. Broderick stated that the effort by the Government was a national one requiring all Jamaicans to play their part. He noted said that a recent study on “Energy Efficiency Potential In Jamaica: Challenges, Opportunities and Strategies for Implementation”, done by the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), highlighted three areas of high electricity usage which accounts for 63 percent of the electricity used in Jamaica: lighting, pumping National Water Commission (NWC) water and air conditioning. He said that if closer scrutiny is paid to air conditioning, and an audit done on public buildings, the high energy consumption levels would be startling. “The hospitals, the schools and the public agencies: you think of how many buildings you go into and the air conditioning that it takes [to keep it cool for the day], can you imagine if we were measuring it against productivity?” he noted. Mr. Broderick suggested that the National Housing Trust (NHT), in their home development projects, implement solar panels as a natural part of the unit entitlement. “We know the National Housing Trust has a facility for solar panels, but why can’t we reach a stage where we say for the next 1,000 houses that NHT is going to put up, that they have a green community then move from there and see the results of that green community,” he suggested. The Minister also noted that efforts will be continuing to have the primary supplier of electricity, the Jamaica Public Service Company (JPS), address the problem of energy loss over power lines, as was highlighted in the recent ECLAC Energy Efficiency study. last_img read more

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NWC to Provide Conservation Strategies on Water Bills

first_imgRelatedWater Project on Track in Western Jamaica NWC to Provide Conservation Strategies on Water Bills EnvironmentJanuary 28, 2014Written by: Rodger Hutchinson FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The National Water Commission (NWC) will be providing conservation strategies to customers on their monthly bills as drought conditions continue to impact the island.This was disclosed by Minister of State in the Ministry of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Ian Hayles, at a meeting of stakeholders held on Monday, January 27, at the Ministry in Kingston.Mr. Hayles told JIS News that the meeting was aimed at providing an update on the drought conditions affecting the island, and come up with clear measures aimed at easing the water woes of citizens. The NWC strategy, he said, is just the kind of “forward thinking” that is needed to address the situation being faced by many persons.“NWC is going to, in its regular supplement in the newspaper, advice citizens of the areas faced with drought. They’ll also be putting on the water bill, an advisory to customers for conservation and strategies that could be adopted because this is important,” he said.Head of the Meteorological Service, Jeffery Spooner, advised that the drought conditions currently affecting the island are projected to continue until at least March. He noted that the most affected parishes are St. Thomas, St. James, Trelawny and St. Mary.“We will definitely keep the citizens updated if there are any changes in the pattern but for now, expect to see the drought pattern hold true,” he said.The dry season occurs annually from January to March and is the period when the island suffers from drought conditions. RelatedWater Ministry to Focus on the Westcenter_img RelatedCedar Valley Residents Benefit From Climate Change Project Advertisements Story HighlightsNWC will be providing conservation strategies to customers on their monthly bills as drought conditions continue to impact the island.This was disclosed by Minister of State in the Ministry of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Ian Hayles, at a meeting of stakeholders held on Monday, January 27.The meeting was aimed at providing an update on the drought conditions affecting the island.last_img read more

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Pico Blvd – Magic to Do: A Musical Extravaganza

first_imgHomeBriefsPico Blvd – Magic to Do: A Musical Extravaganza Jun. 01, 2019 at 5:30 amBriefsEducationSanta Monica CollegePico Blvd – Magic to Do: A Musical Extravaganzanews2 years agoAric Martinkaren benjaminmusicSanta MonicaSanta Monica College Musical Theatre Workshopsmc The Santa Monica College Musical Theatre Workshop class will present Magic to Do: A Musical Extravaganza June 7-9. The lively, entertaining revue features SMC students celebrating musical theatre with selections from a diverse range of shows, from classic to contemporary.SMC Musical Theatre Workshop — a coproduction of the SMC Theatre Arts and Music Departments — is led by SMC Theatre Arts instructor Aric Martin and SMC Music instructor Karen Benjamin.Performances are scheduled at 8 p.m. Friday, June 7; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturday, June 8; and 2 p.m. Sunday, June 9, in the Theatre Arts Studio Stage, located on the main SMC campus at 1900 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica.Advance tickets are $10, plus a service charge, and can be purchased by going to smc.edu/studiostage or by calling 310-434-4319 (M-F). Tickets are $3 higher at the door. Parking is free on Friday evenings and weekends. Late arrivals seated at management discretion. No video feed offered in lobby area.More information is available at smc.edu/studiostage or by calling 310-434-4319.Submitted by Grace Smith, SMC Public Information OfficerTags :Aric Martinkaren benjaminmusicSanta MonicaSanta Monica College Musical Theatre Workshopsmcshare on Facebookshare on Twitteradd a commentPacific Palisades – The Pacific Palisades Historical Society June EventBusinesses warn Trump of consequences of new Mexican tariffsYou Might Also LikeBriefsLos Angeles Sheriff’s deputy accused of destroying evidence of 2019 assaultAssociated Press12 hours agoBriefsCalifornia State Treasurer Fiona Ma to Speak at Online Santa Monica College Commencement Ceremony June 25Guest Author12 hours agoBriefsNewsBeach House Begins Community Re-Opening June 15Guest Author1 day agoBriefsNewsInput Invited for Marine Park Improvement ProjectsGuest Author1 day agoBriefsNewsPublic Health Emphasizes the Importance of Vaccinations as Distancing and Masking Guidelines Relax Next WeekGuest Author1 day agoBriefsNews“Righting Our Wrongs” performance on June 11Guest Author1 day agolast_img read more

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Liberty Wireless confirms MVNO deal with M1 in Singapore

first_img MVNOs mount South Korea 5G pricing challenge Joseph Waring joins Mobile World Live as the Asia editor for its new Asia channel. Before joining the GSMA, Joseph was group editor for Telecom Asia for more than ten years. In addition to writing features, news and blogs, he… Read more Singapore minister pushes for open data exchange Previous ArticleVivendi CEO does not rule out increasing TI stake in futureNext ArticleMobile “key” for next phase of internet growth – report Tags Joseph Waring AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 08 JUL 2015 Relatedcenter_img Author M1 opts for Nokia SA 5G core HomeAsiaNews Liberty Wireless confirms MVNO deal with M1 in Singapore Liberty Wireless, a regional MVNO, has reached an agreement with Singapore’s third largest mobile operator M1 to use its mobile network to launch voice and data services towards the end of the year.Liberty, which will use the Circles Asia brand in Singapore, said in a statement it “aims to transform the regional telecommunications industry by introducing innovative packages and an unparalleled customer experience”.Using M1’s 3G and 4G networks, Singapore-based Liberty plans to be the country’s first MVNO to offer postpaid voice, messaging and data services.M1 chief commercial officer Lee Kok Chew said the partnership will bring about a new value proposition and added choice to consumers.Liberty director Rameez Ansar told Mobile World Live that its focus will be on the data-savvy postpaid consumer market. “There are a number of unmet needs in the market, especially for today’s smartphone users, when current products and services are compared to the most advanced markets in the world.”He said Circles Asia has created a virtual model by setting up its own cloud-based network core running on top of M1’s towers and its data pipe. “Our objective is to empower mobile users with control over their communication needs and set the standard for how telco services should be delivered in Singapore and across the region.”In addition to its deal with Liberty Wireless, M1 also hosts two MVNOs (PLDT and ZTAR Mobile Asia) that have offered prepaid mobile services for a number of years.Singapore has three mobile operators — SingTel, StarHub and M1 — but the telecoms regulator has been taking steps to encourage a fourth mobile player to join the market. Today the IDA proposed setting aside 60MHz of spectrum at a lower reserve price in a separate auction to be open only to new entrants.Given the huge capex required to launch a network, the IDA is aiming to lower the barrier to entry by setting the reserve price at SDG40 million ($29.5 million) for the entire 60MHz block. A total of 225MHz is scheduled to go on sale in the next auction. Asia 4G serviceIDALiberty WirelessM1MVNOSingaporelast_img read more

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Ko, winless in 2017, leads LPGA in Malaysia

first_imgKUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia – Lydia Ko fired a 64 for her best opening round of the year to lead the LPGA tour’s Sime Darby event at 7 under on Thursday, and is hoping her best start will lead to her first title of 2017. The former No. 1-ranked Ko is one shot ahead of Su Oh and two ahead of defending champion and two-time winner Shanshan Feng, Madelene Sagstrom and Eun-Hee Ji, who won by six strokes in Taiwan last week for her first LPGA tour title since 2009. ”Today I tried to be positive and as confident as I can,” said Ko, who finished second in Taiwan last week. ”I think playing well last week really gave me good momentum going into today.” Full-field scores from the Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia Ko opened with a birdie, one of seven in an unblemished round on the par 71, 6,246-yard course at the TPC Kuala Lumpur. ”Made a string of birdies late in my front nine and I was able to keep that momentum going into the back nine,” she said. Ko has three top-10 finishes since September, and 10 overall this year. No. 6-ranked Feng, who has been runner-up here twice along with her victories in 2014 and ’16, said her ball striking was ”super” but she missed some birdie chances. ”I think that means maybe I can still make more over the weekend,” she said, ”I think it’s a good start.”last_img read more

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County Commission Harbors Concern for Water Compact

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. The Flathead County commissioners met with a group of citizens who are concerned about the proposed water rights compact coming from the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the state and federal governments, saying the parties involved seem to be rushing to push it through to the Legislature.The water rights compact for the Flathead Indian Reservation has been in the works for years. A compact is a negotiated agreement that settles the reserved water rights of tribes and federal agencies within the state. Since 1979, the Montana Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission has settled the compacts for the state’s other six reservations; the CSKT compact is the final one.A settlement on water rights would determine how the tribes’ water rights are defined, both the “time immemorial” aboriginal rights and the federally reserved rights.In June, the Beacon reported that negotiators were trying to finalize the proposed compact in time for the 2013 Legislature. The parties involved released the proposed water rights compact on Nov. 8., which filled in the sections of the Oct. 3 version. Now, the commission is seeking comment on the document, with public hearings scheduled to explain the compact and to take public comment (see sidebar for schedule).The comments will be considered and the compact commission will meet on Dec. 19 to decide whether to submit the document to the Legislature for approval. This schedule has irked the concerned citizens who visited the county commissioners’ chambers last week to discuss the compact. The group, led by St. Ignatius resident Terry Backs, said the schedule doesn’t give the public enough time to digest the compact in its entirety, and how it might affect the water rights off the reservation.Commissioner Dale Lauman agreed. “I think it’s a rush to get it to the Legislature,” Lauman said during the meeting.Backs said the compact will likely award more water rights than any other compact in Montana and the country, and she is worried about the landowners who will be removed from state oversight to a new board.Part of the reason the CSKT compact has been so complicated is the Hellgate Treaty of 1855, which created the reservation and retained the hunting, fishing, trapping and gathering rights throughout the tribes’ aboriginal territory.The language in the treaty, upheld in federal court, reserves the “right of taking fish at all usual and accustomed places, in common with citizens of the Treaty,” which has been interpreted to mean that the tribes have non-consumptive rights to the water to maintain streamflows that support fisheries. This territory expands across much of western Montana, and the proposed compact would quantify the off-reservation CSKT water rights. Lauman said the tribes would assume 90,000 acre-feet of the water in the Hungry Horse Reservoir if the compact is approved, and they are also expected to take over the Kerr Dam as well. As a lifelong resident of the Flathead, Lauman said this conflict has been around for decades. Commissioner Pam Holmquist said the board plans on sending a letter to the compact commission before the Nov. 27 meeting in Kalispell, outlining the commissioners’ concerns and about how quickly they think the process is going. For more information, including copies of the proposed Compact and Ordinance, visit, www.dnrc.mt.gov/rwrcc/Compacts/CSKT/Default.asp and www.cskt.org/tr/nrd_waternegotiations.htm. Email [email protected], or contact Rob McDonald, Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (406) 675-2700 ext. 1222 or Bill Schultz (406) 542-5880, or Jay Weiner, (406) 444-6844, Montana Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission.Submit written comments on the proposed compact or ordinance to Mr. Chris Tweeten, Chair, MT RWRCC, 2705 Spurgin Road, Building C, Missoula, MT 59804 or email to [email protected] Meeting ScheduleLIBBY – Nov. 26; 7 p.m. Location: City of Libby – Ponderosa Meeting Room, 952 East Spruce St.BIGFORK – Nov. 27; 1 p.m. Location: Bethany Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall (Basement), 8559 MT HWY 35KALISPELL – Nov. 27, 2012; 7 p.m. Location: Outlaw Inn Hotel Winchester Room, 1701 US HWY 93 SouthPOLSON – Nov. 28; 9 a.m. Kwa TaqNuk Resort, 49708 US HWY 93 EastHOT SPRINGS – Nov. 28; 3 p.m. Salish Senior Center, 214 N. Spring St.THOMPSON FALLS –Nov. 28; 7:30 p.m. Thompson Falls High School Band Room, 601 Golf St.ARLEE –Nov. 29; 10 a.m. Arlee Senior Center, 106 Wessinger St.HAMILTON– Nov. 29; 3 p.m. Ravalli County Administrative Center, Third Floor Conference Room, 215 South 4th St.MISSOULA– Nov. 29; 7:30 p.m. Double Tree Edgewater, Blackfoot Room, 100 MadisonDEER LODGE– Dec. 4; 9 a.m. Powell County Community Center, 416 Cottonwood Ave.PHILIPSBURG– Dec. 4; 2 p.m. Granite County Museum, 135 N. Sansome St.OVANDO –Dec. 4; 7:30 p.m. Ovando School Gym, 108 Birch St. Emaillast_img read more

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