BOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail In response to concerns regarding the Bank of Jamaica’s (BOJ) net financing of $20.6 billion to Government in the October-December, 2009 quarter, the Bank has reiterated its policy position that it will not be a source of deficit funding for the Government going forward.BOJ Governor Brian Wynter, during the monetary policy report for the quarter on Wednesday (February 10), at the BOJ auditorium in Kingston, explained that the initial liquidity injections were temporary.He said that they were triggered, at the time, by reduced investor appetite for Government of Jamaica debt, resulting from the heightened uncertainty in the domestic market surrounding the terms of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) agreement and the associated debt-management initiatives.Of the temporary cash advances of $5.1 billion in November, $2.5 billion was repaid in December, while the $2.6 billion balance was converted to securities. The BOJ also purchased a total of $18 billion of securities on December 15, as well as $13 billion of the Ministry of Finance’s 60-day Treasury bond offer on January 13.The Governor also alluded to a number of factors which would reduce the need for possible BOJ intervention.These factors include the Government’s imminent recovery from current financial challenges, with the approval of a US$1.27 billion loan from the IMF; anticipated receipt of some US$1.1 billion in the first three months of the year from the IMF and other multilaterals; an anticipated return of private support for Government securities; and legal limits on the Central Bank’s capacity to make cash advances to the Government.Temporary BOJ cash advances from November, 2009 to date reflect just under $36.5 billion.Although the BOJ will curtail its support for deficit financing in the medium to long term, because of the possible inflationary effect, the Bank indicated that it would continue to provide liquidity support, through bond purchases, as a temporary measure.“It is possible that the Bank will make further purchases in the March 2010 quarter, to ensure the smooth functioning of the Government until the bond market normalises,” the Quarterly Monetary Policy Report stated.Governor Wynter reinforced this possibility, explaining that if the expected market support for Government bonds does not materialise, the bank will have to intervene, in order to ensure stability until the Jamaica Debt Exchange takes full effect. RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t BOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t Finance & Public ServiceFebruary 13, 2010center_img RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t Advertisementslast_img read more

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Homelessness Seminar To Be Held At CU-Boulder Dec. 2

first_img Published: Nov. 26, 2006 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail A public seminar to promote homelessness awareness will be held at the University of Colorado at Boulder on Saturday, Dec. 2, from 9 a.m. to noon. Organized and sponsored by CU-Boulder students in the Presidents Leadership Class program, the seminar is titled “Inform and Empower: A Seminar on Homelessness,” and will be held in the Muenzinger Psychology building auditorium, room E050. The seminar will include a keynote speech by Jamie Van Leeuwen, project manager of “Road Home,” Denver’s program to drastically reduce homelessness. The seminar also will include four breakout sessions. Breakout session speakers are: Jared Polis, founder of the Jared Polis Foundation; Beka Davis, case manager from Boulder Shelter for the Homeless; Elaina Verveer, director of the Boulder chapter of the Public Achievement project; and Reagan Walton, a CU-Boulder student and Puksta Scholar. Students in the Presidents Leadership Class are selected to receive $2,000 to $10,000 merit-based scholarships and extensive leadership training over four years. Each year 50 first-year students are admitted to the program, which helps them develop leadership skills through coursework, community service and internships. For more information call (303) 588-3776.last_img read more

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Discover the strength, diversity of shared ownership models in Colorado

first_img Wednesday, November 7, 20188:30am – 6:00pm MDTRegistration required Wolf Law Building – CU BoulderWittemeyer Courtroom 2450 Kittredge Loop Dr Boulder, Colorado 80305Program overview8:30am: Registration and networking 9:00am: Program begins 6:00pm: Event ends Building connections between students, professionals and community members interested in using business to positively impact communities and the environment.  Colorado Shared Ownership SummitNovember 7, 2018 in Boulder, ColoradoHow would work be different if a company’s profits went back to its value creators? Perhaps employees would earn higher wages, receive better health care or get more time off. Employees and managers would have aligned incentives and be better positioned to collaborate on innovative ideas.More businesses than you might expect operate this way today. Come connect with local employee-owned companies at the Conscious Capitalism Conference: Colorado Shared Ownership Summit.Register for the conference today View the schedule           Spanish interpretation services will be available thanks to Community Language Cooperative.The Colorado Shared Ownership Summit will be a coming-together for the Colorado co-op, credit union, and ESOP sectors. As part of the Conscious Capitalism Conference series at the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility in CU’s Leeds School of Business, in partnership with the College of Media, Communication and Information, the summit will be one-day event in November 2018, showcasing the strength and diversity of shared ownership models in the state, from farmer co-ops to online platforms. It will be a chance for leaders in these businesses to come together, learn from each other, connect with students, and work together to support the next generation of community-ownership entrepreneurs.Learn more about shared ownership on our blogTraveling from the Western Slope or a rural part of the state? Request travel support. Speakers include:Doug O’Brien (President and CEO, National Cooperative Business Association)Yessica Holguin (Community Wealth Building Network)Conveners at CU Boulder:Mark Meaney (Executive Director, Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility)Nathan Schneider (Assistant Professor, Media Studies)Advisory board:Kaeleigh Barker (Cooperatives for a Better World)Yessica Holguin (Community Wealth Building Network)Linda Phillips (Phillips Law Offices, Colorado Cooperative Developers)Bill Stevenson (Rocky Mountain Farmers Union)Halisi Vinson (Rocky Mountain Employee Ownership Center)Jason Wiener (jason wiener | p.c., Colorado Cooperative Developers)center_img Sponsors:last_img read more

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JCF Receives Non-Lethal Equipment

first_imgJCF Receives Non-Lethal Equipment National SecurityNovember 14, 2014Written by: Shelly-Ann Irving Story HighlightsThe Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) has received 3,400 kits containing non-lethal weapons from the United States Government, which will boost its continued thrust towards the use of less forceful methods in law enforcement.The kits, which each contain a retractable baton, pepper spray canister, a pair of handcuffs and a utility belt, represent the first tranche of a donation of equipment to benefit 7, 500 members of the force.The contribution from the US Government, including training in their use, is valued at US$2.4 million. RelatedNational Security Minister Condemns Killing of JTB Consultant Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail JCF Receives Non-Lethal EquipmentJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaycenter_img RelatedMOCA Gets Polygraph Centre The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) has received 3,400 kits containing non-lethal weapons from the United States Government, which will boost its continued thrust towards the use of less forceful methods in law enforcement.The kits, which each contain a retractable baton, pepper spray canister, a pair of handcuffs and a utility belt, represent the first tranche of a donation of equipment to benefit 7, 500 members of the force. The contribution from the US Government, including training in their use, is valued at US$2.4 million.At the official launch of the training course on November 13, at the National Police College in Twickenham Park, St. Catherine, National Security Minister, Hon. Peter Bunting, expressed gratitude for the donation.“This could hardly be more timely. We accept, with gratitude, this very generous gift from the United States Government. These kits will be sufficient to equip most of our frontline police personnel and I was also assured that the kits are of very high quality,” he said.Minister Bunting said that as part of the culture change within the JCF, a number of measures have been undertaken, including downplaying the “paramilitary style” of policing, and civilianizing the dress and appearance of police personnel.“So, there are fewer police personnel in blue denim, body armour, armed with assault rifles when not necessary. Instead, there are more police in ‘red seam’ uniforms and khaki for senior ranks,” he noted.Charge d’ Affaires at the United States Embassy in Kingston, Elizabeth Lee Martinez, who also spoke at the launch, said the donation does not end with the training and distribution of the kits.“The United States is committed to an ongoing partnership with the JCF to create an annual refresher for all officers in less than lethal force. The goal is that these techniques will soon become second nature and part of the culture of the JCF,” she said.She commended Commissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams and the JCF for their “commitment to professionalism and to improving their skills and abilities to resolve conflict with a minimum use of force”.Commissioner Williams, for his part, said the donation from the US Government will change the face of the interaction between the police and citizens.“It will change situations in which we have to use the firearm, which has been our only means of deploying force for a long time,” he noted.Twenty-six members of the JCF, in different division and at varying levels, are participating in the week-long training course at the National Police College, which runs from November 10 to 15.Corporal Rachel Henry, who is one of two females participating in the training, said she is excited to go back to her division to impart the knowledge gained.“I find that this method is better and will enhance what we have been using. It is good exposure for me and my colleagues; I love it. So far, we have gone through some safety precautions measure using less lethal options such as the baton. Throughout the remainder of the week, we will be exposed to other techniques,” she informed. Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting (left); Charge d’ Affaires at the United States Embassy in Kingston, Elizabeth Lee Martinez; and Commissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams (2nd right), look on while a member of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) points out the items in his non-lethal kit. A total of 3,500 kits, donated by the United States Government, are being utilised in a week-long training course in non-lethal force, which was officially launched on November 13, at the National Police College in St. Catherine. RelatedPolice Deploy Additional Resources to Bog Walklast_img read more

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TT Postscript: 72 a round of many adjectives

first_imgFARMINGDALE, N.Y. – Ouch. No more words need to be said. Or typed. But I’ll still try. Tiger Woods shot an opening 2-over 72 Thursday at the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black. It looked bad, then good, then great, then ended poorly. Here are some things I think I think after Tiger’s first competitive round in 32 days: • If you just looked at the final score you may not be so discouraged. But once you break it down, you quickly will be if you’re a Tiger fan. The biggest thing to be discouraged about is that Tiger is nine shots behind leader Brooks Koepka. That’s a big problem. Huge. • The double bogey on the first hole was deserved. He hit a bad tee shot, poked his approach up the fairway, and then hit an awful wedge shot over the green and failed to get up and down. Immediately, it seemed like there was much competitive rust. • After birdie at 15, he recorded another double bogey on the par-3 17th hole (his eighth hole of the day) when his tee shot was in a terrible spot in the bunker. He took a mighty swing and the ball found the back of the green, but he promptly three-putted from there. • Birdie, birdie, par, eagle was how Tiger started his second nine holes. Bogey, par, bogey, bogey, par was how he ended it. PGA Championship: Scores | Full coverage • Tiger had three three-putts on the round, each time missing from that 5- to 8-foot range. • About the Wednesday no-show, Tiger said: “I got a little bit sick, so I decided to stay home.” Twenty-four hours after his agent said he was not sick. • More Tiger: “It wasn’t as clean as I’d like to have it for sure. Didn’t get off to a very good start. It was a good drive and ended up in a bad spot, and I compounded the problem with trying to use the backboard behind the hole there and missing a putt I should have made. And then found my way back around. Got it back under par for the day, and let a couple slip away with a couple bad putts and a couple mistakes at the end.” • Round 2 begins at 1:49 p.m. ET. Going to have 24 hours to stew about this one, then get to go out and watch Tiger while also witnessing Brooks continue to do what Tiger used to do to people.last_img read more

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A Follow-Up Question on Evolutionary Ethics

first_img Recommended Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Share Thoughtful reader Paul, a university freshman in the U.K., asks about Michael Egnor’s article from last year, “From the Annals of Evolutionary Ethics.” I have recently been studying the topic of morality, specifically whether or not objective moral values and duties exist. I have found many sources favouring the view of relative morality, but few supporting the existence of objective moral values and duties.“A Simple Issue”Per the reader’s request, I asked Michael Egnor to “defend the reality of objectively real morals.” Dr. Egnor’s answer:I see it as a very simple issue. If there is objective moral law, then acts are right or wrong in themselves.If there is no objective moral law, then moral law is just individual opinion. Of course, an individual may have the opinion that all people ought to do X, but that’s just one opinion out of 7 billion opinions. Who is to say what opinions ”ought” to be done? We could vote, but there’s no reason to apply democratic reasoning to moral law (the Holocaust was fairly popular in Berlin in the early 1940s and would undoubtedly have prevailed in a referendum).Since there is no rational way to adjudicate moral law if it is merely individual opinions, moral relativism always boils down to power. “X is right” because I, who believe X is right, am stronger than you, who believe X is wrong. If you disagree, I’ll beat you up.If objective moral law is not real, then nothing is right or wrong in itself. Killing innocent people, raping babies, torturing puppies is merely a matter of taste, like preference in ice cream. “I hate genocide!” has the same probity as “I hate pistachio!”If you don’t believe in objective moral law, a law outside of human opinion, that’s fine. But then you are forced to acknowledge that your opinion on genocide/puppy assault/rape, etc., has the same moral standing as your opinion on art or ice cream. Opinion is opinion, and if you want to decide whose opinion wins, let’s arm wrestle.If moral law is real, then genocide and rape are really wrong, in themselves, no matter what anyone thinks. But if 1) moral law is real, then there must be 2) a lawgiver.That’s the problem for moral relativists. They don’t want to admit 2, so they deny 1.It’s a simple matter. The literature may be interesting, but it’s just simple logic really.By the way, if you don’t think that genocide would have been popular if put to a vote in Germany, read Daniel Goldhagen’s eye-opening book, Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust.Photo: Entrance to Auschwitz II-Birkenau death camp, by Nelson Pérez [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons. TagsAdolf HitlerAuschwitz II-BirkenauBerlinDaniel Goldhagenevolutionary ethicsgenocideGermansGermanyHitler’s Willing ExecutionersHolocaustlawgiverMichael EgnorMoral Lawmoral relativistsmoralitypistachiorape,Trending Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Mancenter_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Culture & Ethics Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Evolution A Follow-Up Question on Evolutionary EthicsDavid [email protected]_klinghofferOctober 3, 2019, 3:00 PM A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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Privileged Species

first_imgOrigin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Recommended From June 16-30, we are holding an Intelligent Design YouTube Festival by highlighting 15 Center for Science & Culture YouTube videos that have received more than 100,000 views each. Here is video #9, “Privileged Species.” Intelligent Design Privileged SpeciesEvolution News @DiscoveryCSCJune 24, 2020, 9:13 AM Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis TagsCenter for Science & CultureChildren of LightDarwinismFire-Makerhuman dignityhuman uniquenesshumanityIntelligent Design YouTube FestivalMichael Dentonmovie producersNature’s DestinyPrivileged SpeciesThe Wonder of Water,Trending Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Evolution NewsEvolution News & Science Today (EN) provides original reporting and analysis about evolution, neuroscience, bioethics, intelligent design and other science-related issues, including breaking news about scientific research. It also covers the impact of science on culture and conflicts over free speech and academic freedom in science. Finally, it fact-checks and critiques media coverage of scientific issues. Share If you’d like us to create more videos like this one, please consider becoming one of our “movie producers” by donating to our video production fund. Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Man Darwinism has had a negative influence on our conceptions of human dignity and uniqueness. But geneticist Michael Denton thinks science is now pointing the way to the specialness of all humanity. This video was inspired by Denton’s vision presented in his book Nature’s Destiny. We hope you are inspired too! And if you want to follow up on Denton’s ideas, read his more recent books Fire-Maker, The Wonder of Water, and Children of Light. A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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Blending British and Whitefish

first_imgToday the family is “delighted” to have taken that giant step. Not only did the parents settle into a successful business in the heart of town, but Matty went on to become an all-state captain on the high school soccer team. Now a senior, Matty helped the Bulldogs win the Class A state championship in the fall and is being pursued by college soccer programs. The move has gone better than planned, Haines said. The same can be said about the revitalized sandwich and pub shop, which has already picked up with more business than before, she said. The business has grown from four employees to 16 and the new shop is now decorated with a mix of pictures of Great Britain and the Whitefish soccer team. It’s just as Haines and McCrone envisioned it, distinctly British-Whitefish. “There aren’t many better places in the world to live,” she said. “When I come into work here everyday, it’s something to really be proud of. I like this. It’s how we want it to be.” Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. WHITEFISH – Every British pub tries to offer a few traditional meals that are “scrummy.” That might sound uncomplimentary in the U.S., but it’s rather high praise in England. The newly renovated pub and sandwich shop Quickee now has a whole menu full of British and American dishes that deserve being called scrummy, or tasty to an American. Winner of the “Best Sandwich” in town seven years running, Quickee recently evolved, both in location and taste. After being closed for six weeks, the sandwich shop reopened on the corner of Second Street East and Lupfer Avenue in early January in a fully renovated building twice the size of its old location. Steve Minser, Laura Klein and Jessica Gutting, left to right, dine in the new Quickee Pub and Sandwich Shop location in Whitefish. Email The shop offers both lunch and dinner, either to go or in its sit-down restaurant. The food is almost all supplied locally and the beer and wine list is similarly recognizable. The menu still has a few classic items intact, such as its popular sandwiches. But there’s a new lineup of rather foreign names that are probably more familiar to the owners, Yvette Haines and her husband Peter McCrone. There’s bangers and mash – sausages coated in caramelized onion sauce atop mash potatoes. There’s steak and ale pie – steak slices, mixed vegetables and leeks simmered in Cold Smoke ale gravy. And, of course, there’s fish and chips, another Great Britain staple. “True to my roots, we’re British pub-style food now,” Haines said. The new Quickee reflects a blending of two proudly unique identities – British and Whitefish – and so do Haines and McCrone. The husband-wife team gives away their English roots with just a few words. Haines and McCrone, both from England, moved to Whitefish in late 2008 after falling in love with the town years earlier. Haines had visited a dude ranch in Fortine in 2004 and she wanted her husband and son to share the memorable experience. The family visited together a couple years later and the trip ended up being more than just memorable. “We went back to the (United Kingdom) and none of us could settle,” Haines said. “We really loved it here so much. It just kind of draws you in.” The family began seriously considering a move to Northwest Montana, but there was one major hurdle in the way. In order to be granted a U.S. visa, foreigners must meet a few criteria, including committing to purchasing a business. Haines and McCrone discovered Quickee, which had opened in 2000 as a lunch stop. But before making the life-changing decision, Haines made sure the family was all on board, especially her son Matty. “It was all or nothing. We either all wanted to do it or we weren’t going to do it at all,” Haines said. “Matty was the keenest of us all to come. He really wanted to do it … We had to make that blind commitment. It was a big leap of faith.” Line cook Lainy Klein places two prepared plates of food in the pickup window at the new Quickee Pub and Sandwich Shop location in Whitefish.last_img read more

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NPHET recommend closure of non-essential retail

first_img Pinterest Twitter Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Pinterest FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Facebookcenter_img AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp The National Public Health Emergency Team has recommended the closure of non-essential retail from St. Stephen’s Day.The Chief Medical Officer has warned the spread of Covid-19 is “out of control” with the number of cases doubling in less than a week.A further 938 new cases were confirmed last night with 13 additional deaths, while the R number has risen to between 1.5 and 1.8 – the highest since March.68 of the new cases are in Donegal with the county’s 14 day incidence rate currently at 317.9 – more than double the national average.Restaurants and pubs serving food will close at 3 o’clock this afternoon as part of new restrictions – while hairdressers and barbers will also shut later.But Professor Philip Nolan, chair of NPHET’s modelling advisory group, doesn’t think those measures will bring the virus back under control:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/nolan7am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. NPHET recommend closure of non-essential retail Previous articleNorth confirms its first case of coronavirus variantNext articleMan to run barefoot from Donegal to Kerry for Pieta House News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 By News Highland – December 24, 2020 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

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News / Vaccine is good news, but are supply chains cold enough to handle it?

first_img© BiancoBlue The good news of Pfizer and BioNTech’s Covid vaccine has been tempered by the requirement that it needs to be stored at -70C or below – a tough challenge for the logistics business.A recent survey by phamra.aero and Tiaca found that only 15% of respondents said they could handle vaccines that require -80C storage, while fewer than half those who said they could handle minus-zero, said they could do so in all their locations. By Alex Lennane 10/11/2020center_img Initial results have showed that Pfizer/BioNTech’s vaccine is 90% effective, according to initial results, triggering demand for the drug and, while it is not expected to be the only one, it looks set to be among the first vaccines to be rolled out on a big scale.But logistics companies have already noted that temperature excursions are their biggest concern, followed by lack of adequate infrastructure.“To maintain supply chain integrity and temperature control from the manufacturing site for the entire journey will require all parties to work together,” said Glyn Hughes, head of IATA Cargo, in September.“The biggest challenge will be the final mile, and that’s where the greatest focus is. We already have well-established procedures, but we will need to scale-up – they don’t cover everywhere.“In Africa for example, there are few passenger services and no real methods of distribution. It’s too large, with too many borders, and you can’t use road or ocean. It will need planning with military precision. One way would be to set up cool facilities at staging points throughout the continent.“Aid agencies have incredible expertise in this. We would then work as an industry to deploy their plans.”Frank van Gelder, head of phama.aero, believes the whole process would take a few years.“The roll-out model depends on agreements that different governments have secured with vaccine producers, and the number of vaccine dosages required for a treatment to reach immunity. Some might have secured in large volumes while some in regular batches.“We also need to take into consideration where the first few batches of vaccines would be delivered. This would have impact on the cold chain capacity at destinations. Still, the expectation is that momentum will build as the vaccines producers increase production.”Pfizer told Reuters it had developed detailed logistical plans and tools to support vaccine transport, storage and continuous temperature monitoring.“We have also developed packaging and storage innovations to be fit for purpose for the range of locations where we believe vaccinations will take place,” it said.But many countries don’t have the facilities to store vaccines at that temperature – even wealthier ones such as Japan. One infection control manager in Tokyo told Reuters storage would be “a big challenge”.The manager added: “I’m not sure how well prepared our government is with regards to maintaining the cold chain. Hospitals in Japan usually do not have ultra-cold freezers, but I think it’s high time we started thinking about the logistics for the vaccine.”Medical freezer companies said demand had jumped about 150% this year.last_img read more

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