Tiffany wins expedited trial over LVMH’s bid to ditch $16bn takeover

first_imgA spokesperson for LVMH said the company was “fully confident that it will be able to defeat Tiffany’s accusations and convince the court that the conditions necessary for the acquisition of Tiffany are no longer met”. Tiffany wins expedited trial over LVMH’s bid to ditch $16bn takeover Before the Open: Get the jump on the markets with our early morning newsletter Tiffany’s chairman Roger Farah said the jeweller will “demonstrate to the court that LVMH is in clear breach of its obligations under a valid and binding agreement and that their claim of a material adverse effect is completely baseless.” Pepperman added that Tiffany was operating under tough trading restrictions in line with the terms of the deal, including limits to its capital expenditure. Tiffany & Co has won a motion to fast-track its lawsuit over LVMH’s bid to abandon a $16.6bn (£12.9bn) takeover of the US jeweller.  whatsapp Tags: Coronavirus LVMH, which is owned by French billionaire and Europe’s richest man Bernard Arnault, said the French government had urged it to delay the $16.6bn deal in a bid to help the country settle a trade dispute with the US. Richard Pepperman, representing Tiffany, said LVMH was attempting to place the jeweller’s board under “overwhelming pressure” to agree to a reduced price tag. “They want to acquire Tiffany, but at a lower price than what they agreed to,” he said. Also Read: Tiffany wins expedited trial over LVMH’s bid to ditch $16bn takeover whatsappcenter_img Share It cited the jeweller’s decision to continue paying $70m in dividends per quarter during the coronavirus crisis, despite reporting a net loss of $32.7m during the first half of 2020.  Tiffany argued LVMH is attempting to “run out the clock” on the deal, which must be closed by 24 November, according to the terms of the takeover agreement.  However LVMH, which owns brands such as Louis Vuitton, Sephora, Givenchy and Christian Dior, has accused Tiffany of being reckless with cash during the pandemic.  Tuesday 22 September 2020 9:40 am Tiffany earlier this month sought legal action against luxury goods firm LVMH after the Paris-based company said the takeover deal was “no longer possible”. Poppy Wood Also Read: Tiffany wins expedited trial over LVMH’s bid to ditch $16bn takeover The jeweller claimed a longer timeline for the takeover bid, which is the biggest ever in the luxury sector, would force Tiffany to settle for a lower price or lose out on the deal altogether.  Show Comments ▼ However, a court in Delaware yesterday rejected LVMH’s arguments that it would be “too complicated” to expedite the lawsuit, and set a four-day trial for the start of January.last_img read more

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Southeast lawmakers split on Walker budget plan

first_imgEconomy | Southeast | State Government | SyndicatedSoutheast lawmakers split on Walker budget planJanuary 5, 2016 by Ed Schoenfeld, CoastAlaska News Share:Reps. Cathy Muñoz, center, and Sam Kito, right, listed as Sen. Dennis Egan makes a point. The three Juneau lawmakers make up half of Southeast’s legislative delegation. (Photo by Casey Kelly/KTOO)Southeast Alaska lawmakers are giving Gov. Bill Walker’s spending plan mixed reviews. Some are ready to change the way government is funded, while others are not.Audio Playerhttps://media.ktoo.org/2016/01/31SEReax.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Ketchikan Rep. Dan OrtizKetchikan Independent Rep. Dan Ortiz has been walking the streets of his district, dropping off door-hangers.“What I’m doing is looking for input from my constituents on the governor’s plan and on what they think we might do about this fiscal situation that we’re facing and that hopefully going to tackle here in this upcoming legislative session,” he says.What he’s heard so far is a mixed bag. People are skeptical. Many worry about changing the dividend. And they’re pretty much split on the income tax.Those are just some parts of Walker’s proposal. While the region’s six lawmakers object to some elements, they all think it’s begun an important discussion about the future of the state.“It’s a plan, which is more than anyone has put forth to date,” says Sitka Democratic Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins.“I admire his leadership. I think it’s very important that the governor lead with a plan at this time in the process,” says Juneau Republican Rep. Cathy Muñoz.” I think it’s a good idea to get a lot of these topics on the table and talk about them,” says Sitka Republican Sen. Bert Stedman.“I think there is something there for everybody to dislike,” says Juneau Democratic Rep. Sam Kito.“It’s not going to fly in the Legislature. But it least it’s a starting point,” says Juneau Democratic Sen. Dennis Egan.Walker’s biggest proposal is to make Permanent Fund earnings pay for the day-to-day operation of state government. Some other pots of money, including oil and gas revenues, would also play new roles.Sitka Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-TomkinsKreiss-Tomkins says the math makes sense.“It we put that money to work, if we make it earn interest for us, it makes a lot more money for Alaska, which means a lot less money that Alaskans might have to pay in taxes or fees,” he says.Kito isn’t so sure.“I do have questions about whether or not the fund proposed by the governor will generate the amount of revenue that he’s anticipating will be generated,” he says.Stedman says it may be too much, too soon.“That concept at some point in the future is going to come home to roost for the state. I’m just not convinced – and I might be – that the time to implement it needs to be relatively immediately,” he says.Then there’s the governor’s plan to fund dividends with resource revenues, instead of Permanent Fund earnings. It would guarantee the next PFD would be $1,000, but the amount could drop in future years.Stedman, who also represents Ketchikan, Petersburg and Southeast villages, says it will drop, since oil production is expected to remain low or decline further. Most other regional legislators also voice concerns about low production and prices.Kito, who also represents Haines and Skagway, says the PFD plan may be based on faulty expectations.“I do worry that if we have the dividend tied to those components only in the hopes of getting a natural gas pipeline several years down the road, we could see too much of a reduction in the dividend,” he says.Sitka Sen. Bert StedmanMuñoz says lawmakers could take a different approach.“It might be possible that we temporarily cap the dividend for two to three years or three to five years,” she says.The region’s six lawmakers are split on Walker’s call for a state income tax of about 1.5 percent.Kreiss-Tomkins, who also represents Petersburg and Southeast villages, says it would target out-of-state workers’ earnings.“Right now, all that money leaves with them and I like that the income tax captures some of that huge stream of money,” he says.Juneau Sen. Egan, who also represents Haines and Skagway, says it’s one of Walker’s better tax proposals.“He set income levels that won’t affect a lot of people in Bush Alaska or rural Alaska. I think we have to come up to the plate. We’re doing nothing right now,” he says.Stedman says such a tax would hurt the economy. Muñoz has the same take.“I think an income tax should be the last solution. I think it’s early to implement a broad-based tax, especially as we go into uncertain economic times,” he says.The governor’s plan includes other taxes, on alcohol, tobacco, tourism, fisheries and mining. Some of the region’s lawmakers want more information, though several like the tobacco tax.Alaska Gov. Bill WalkerWhile Walker’s budget focuses on new revenue sources, it also calls for $100 million in state-spending cuts.Ortiz, who also represents Wrangell, says he knows spending has to be lower.“I’ll be supportive of the governor’s budget in that area. But further cuts or further reductions from what he’s talking about, I’ll be working awful hard not to see that happen,” he says.He and most other Southeast lawmakers are concerned about marine highway system reductions. Several also worry about cutting early childhood education and university spending, and flat funding for schools.Egan says he’s concerned the Legislature won’t do much of anything.“All 40 House members and (20) members in the Senate will have to run for re-election this year. I’m worried we’re going to try to kick the can down the road. We can’t do that,” he says.Southeast lawmakers make up 10 percent of Alaska’s Legislature, giving the region far less power than Southcentral or the larger Railbelt area.Only one of Southeast’s six lawmakers are in the Majority. Republican Muñoz also serves on the House Finance Committee where most spending decisions are made.Note: This report was updated to clarify that Sen. Bert Stedman’s concerns about PDF funding were due to declining oil production, rather than prices.Share this story:last_img read more

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Unalaska police chief confirms investigation of city councilors

first_imgAleutians | Local Government | Public SafetyUnalaska police chief confirms investigation of city councilorsOctober 25, 2017 by Laura Kraegel, KUCB-Unalaska Share:City Councilors Alejandro “Bong” Tungul, center, and Dave Gregory, right, acknowledged the investigation at the Oct. 24 meeting of the Unalaska City Council. Tungul said he’s received a warrant targeting his emails. (Photo by Berett Wilber/KUCB)Members of the Unalaska City Council are under investigation.Police Chief Mike Holman confirmed Tuesday to KUCB that the Unalaska Department of Public Safety is investigating current and potentially former city councilors.Holman declined to comment on the scope of the inquiry. But at Tuesday’s City Council meeting, former councilor Yudelka Leclere connected it to the ongoing controversy surrounding Deputy Police Chief Jennifer Shockley.“Today, I can stand here and look at you, Officer Shockley,” said Leclere, during public comments. “We never gave an order to fire you.”Since August, the council has denied accusations that they pressured former city manager Dave Martinson to discipline Shockley for creating a survey asking Unalaskans to rate their satisfaction with each councilor.When Martinson resigned last month, however, he cited long-term tension with the council that came to a head recently over a “personnel decision.” While it appears councilors are now under investigation for their roles in the power struggle, Councilor Dave Gregory said the extent of the probe is unclear.“There’s an investigation of council members,” said Gregory. “Maybe it’s Roger (Rowland), maybe it’s me, maybe it’s Yudelka (Leclere), maybe it’s the other council members. We don’t know. We can’t get any information on it.”Holman said the local Public Safety Department is “part” of the investigation, but he wouldn’t confirm whether other agencies are involved or comment on the timeline for completion.The most specific information came from Councilor Alejandro “Bong” Tungul, who said an attorney has asked to review his emails.“I’m being served a warrant on my computer, which I’m not happy about,” Tungul said.A KUCB public information request for all August emails between the city manager, mayor and council was returned heavily redacted by the city attorney.While the community awaits more information, the council has narrowly upheld a directive that could launch a counter-investigation.At her last meeting in office, Leclere proposed hiring a third-party investigator to look into the matter.Several current councilors argued the city should let the ongoing inquiry play out before taking any action. But others agreed an independent investigator is necessary, given the deputy police chief’s role in the incident.“Since people who are in the Public Safety division are part of this, we need to get some outside assistance.” Councilor James Fitch said.Councilors split 3-3 over the directive, leaving Mayor Frank Kelty to cast the tiebreaker vote.He pushed the motion forward, authorizing the interim city manager and city attorney to explore the possibility of contracting for a separate investigation.The City Council’s next meeting is Nov. 14.Share this story:last_img read more

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Kilminchy to host heritage day as part of National Heritage Week

first_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory GAA To keep the children busy there will be fun wildlife games in the morning.That evening at 7pm to 8pm in the Sue Ryder Centre, Kilminchy, Sean Murray of the Laois Heritage Society will give a fascinating talk on the rich history of Kilminchy.The event is free and all are welcome.Coordinated by The Heritage Council, National Heritage Week takes place every year during the last week of August.The programme highlights the abundance of great work that is carried out in all communities in Ireland to preserve and promote our natural, built and cultural heritage.SEE ALSO – Moment in Time: Sun shines down on Abbeyleix for their 2004 Fete Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Kilminchy to host heritage day as part of National Heritage Week TAGSKilminchyNational Heritage Week Twitter Facebookcenter_img Previous articleDeaths in Laois – Wednesday, August 14, 2019Next articleNational championships honour for two friends from Laois Marlins swim club Bronagh Scully Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results As part of National Heritage Week, Kilminchy housing estate will host their own heritage day to celebrate their natural and cultural heritage.Taking place on Saturday August 17, the heritage day in Laois’s largest housing estate will be split into two parts.In the morning from 10am onwards, the community with the help of Irish Wildlife Trust Laois/Offaly Branch will cut its new wildflower meadow at the lakes. Volunteers will be required from 10am. GAA Twitter GAA Home News Community Kilminchy to host heritage day as part of National Heritage Week NewsCommunity By Bronagh Scully – 14th August 2019 Pinterest 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

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BOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail In response to concerns regarding the Bank of Jamaica’s (BOJ) net financing of $20.6 billion to Government in the October-December, 2009 quarter, the Bank has reiterated its policy position that it will not be a source of deficit funding for the Government going forward.BOJ Governor Brian Wynter, during the monetary policy report for the quarter on Wednesday (February 10), at the BOJ auditorium in Kingston, explained that the initial liquidity injections were temporary.He said that they were triggered, at the time, by reduced investor appetite for Government of Jamaica debt, resulting from the heightened uncertainty in the domestic market surrounding the terms of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) agreement and the associated debt-management initiatives.Of the temporary cash advances of $5.1 billion in November, $2.5 billion was repaid in December, while the $2.6 billion balance was converted to securities. The BOJ also purchased a total of $18 billion of securities on December 15, as well as $13 billion of the Ministry of Finance’s 60-day Treasury bond offer on January 13.The Governor also alluded to a number of factors which would reduce the need for possible BOJ intervention.These factors include the Government’s imminent recovery from current financial challenges, with the approval of a US$1.27 billion loan from the IMF; anticipated receipt of some US$1.1 billion in the first three months of the year from the IMF and other multilaterals; an anticipated return of private support for Government securities; and legal limits on the Central Bank’s capacity to make cash advances to the Government.Temporary BOJ cash advances from November, 2009 to date reflect just under $36.5 billion.Although the BOJ will curtail its support for deficit financing in the medium to long term, because of the possible inflationary effect, the Bank indicated that it would continue to provide liquidity support, through bond purchases, as a temporary measure.“It is possible that the Bank will make further purchases in the March 2010 quarter, to ensure the smooth functioning of the Government until the bond market normalises,” the Quarterly Monetary Policy Report stated.Governor Wynter reinforced this possibility, explaining that if the expected market support for Government bonds does not materialise, the bank will have to intervene, in order to ensure stability until the Jamaica Debt Exchange takes full effect. RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t BOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t Finance & Public ServiceFebruary 13, 2010center_img RelatedBOJ Clarifies 2009 Cash Advances to Gov’t Advertisementslast_img read more

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Homelessness Seminar To Be Held At CU-Boulder Dec. 2

first_img Published: Nov. 26, 2006 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail A public seminar to promote homelessness awareness will be held at the University of Colorado at Boulder on Saturday, Dec. 2, from 9 a.m. to noon. Organized and sponsored by CU-Boulder students in the Presidents Leadership Class program, the seminar is titled “Inform and Empower: A Seminar on Homelessness,” and will be held in the Muenzinger Psychology building auditorium, room E050. The seminar will include a keynote speech by Jamie Van Leeuwen, project manager of “Road Home,” Denver’s program to drastically reduce homelessness. The seminar also will include four breakout sessions. Breakout session speakers are: Jared Polis, founder of the Jared Polis Foundation; Beka Davis, case manager from Boulder Shelter for the Homeless; Elaina Verveer, director of the Boulder chapter of the Public Achievement project; and Reagan Walton, a CU-Boulder student and Puksta Scholar. Students in the Presidents Leadership Class are selected to receive $2,000 to $10,000 merit-based scholarships and extensive leadership training over four years. Each year 50 first-year students are admitted to the program, which helps them develop leadership skills through coursework, community service and internships. For more information call (303) 588-3776.last_img read more

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Discover the strength, diversity of shared ownership models in Colorado

first_img Wednesday, November 7, 20188:30am – 6:00pm MDTRegistration required Wolf Law Building – CU BoulderWittemeyer Courtroom 2450 Kittredge Loop Dr Boulder, Colorado 80305Program overview8:30am: Registration and networking 9:00am: Program begins 6:00pm: Event ends Building connections between students, professionals and community members interested in using business to positively impact communities and the environment.  Colorado Shared Ownership SummitNovember 7, 2018 in Boulder, ColoradoHow would work be different if a company’s profits went back to its value creators? Perhaps employees would earn higher wages, receive better health care or get more time off. Employees and managers would have aligned incentives and be better positioned to collaborate on innovative ideas.More businesses than you might expect operate this way today. Come connect with local employee-owned companies at the Conscious Capitalism Conference: Colorado Shared Ownership Summit.Register for the conference today View the schedule           Spanish interpretation services will be available thanks to Community Language Cooperative.The Colorado Shared Ownership Summit will be a coming-together for the Colorado co-op, credit union, and ESOP sectors. As part of the Conscious Capitalism Conference series at the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility in CU’s Leeds School of Business, in partnership with the College of Media, Communication and Information, the summit will be one-day event in November 2018, showcasing the strength and diversity of shared ownership models in the state, from farmer co-ops to online platforms. It will be a chance for leaders in these businesses to come together, learn from each other, connect with students, and work together to support the next generation of community-ownership entrepreneurs.Learn more about shared ownership on our blogTraveling from the Western Slope or a rural part of the state? Request travel support. Speakers include:Doug O’Brien (President and CEO, National Cooperative Business Association)Yessica Holguin (Community Wealth Building Network)Conveners at CU Boulder:Mark Meaney (Executive Director, Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility)Nathan Schneider (Assistant Professor, Media Studies)Advisory board:Kaeleigh Barker (Cooperatives for a Better World)Yessica Holguin (Community Wealth Building Network)Linda Phillips (Phillips Law Offices, Colorado Cooperative Developers)Bill Stevenson (Rocky Mountain Farmers Union)Halisi Vinson (Rocky Mountain Employee Ownership Center)Jason Wiener (jason wiener | p.c., Colorado Cooperative Developers)center_img Sponsors:last_img read more

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JCF Receives Non-Lethal Equipment

first_imgJCF Receives Non-Lethal Equipment National SecurityNovember 14, 2014Written by: Shelly-Ann Irving Story HighlightsThe Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) has received 3,400 kits containing non-lethal weapons from the United States Government, which will boost its continued thrust towards the use of less forceful methods in law enforcement.The kits, which each contain a retractable baton, pepper spray canister, a pair of handcuffs and a utility belt, represent the first tranche of a donation of equipment to benefit 7, 500 members of the force.The contribution from the US Government, including training in their use, is valued at US$2.4 million. RelatedNational Security Minister Condemns Killing of JTB Consultant Advertisements FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail JCF Receives Non-Lethal EquipmentJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlaycenter_img RelatedMOCA Gets Polygraph Centre The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) has received 3,400 kits containing non-lethal weapons from the United States Government, which will boost its continued thrust towards the use of less forceful methods in law enforcement.The kits, which each contain a retractable baton, pepper spray canister, a pair of handcuffs and a utility belt, represent the first tranche of a donation of equipment to benefit 7, 500 members of the force. The contribution from the US Government, including training in their use, is valued at US$2.4 million.At the official launch of the training course on November 13, at the National Police College in Twickenham Park, St. Catherine, National Security Minister, Hon. Peter Bunting, expressed gratitude for the donation.“This could hardly be more timely. We accept, with gratitude, this very generous gift from the United States Government. These kits will be sufficient to equip most of our frontline police personnel and I was also assured that the kits are of very high quality,” he said.Minister Bunting said that as part of the culture change within the JCF, a number of measures have been undertaken, including downplaying the “paramilitary style” of policing, and civilianizing the dress and appearance of police personnel.“So, there are fewer police personnel in blue denim, body armour, armed with assault rifles when not necessary. Instead, there are more police in ‘red seam’ uniforms and khaki for senior ranks,” he noted.Charge d’ Affaires at the United States Embassy in Kingston, Elizabeth Lee Martinez, who also spoke at the launch, said the donation does not end with the training and distribution of the kits.“The United States is committed to an ongoing partnership with the JCF to create an annual refresher for all officers in less than lethal force. The goal is that these techniques will soon become second nature and part of the culture of the JCF,” she said.She commended Commissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams and the JCF for their “commitment to professionalism and to improving their skills and abilities to resolve conflict with a minimum use of force”.Commissioner Williams, for his part, said the donation from the US Government will change the face of the interaction between the police and citizens.“It will change situations in which we have to use the firearm, which has been our only means of deploying force for a long time,” he noted.Twenty-six members of the JCF, in different division and at varying levels, are participating in the week-long training course at the National Police College, which runs from November 10 to 15.Corporal Rachel Henry, who is one of two females participating in the training, said she is excited to go back to her division to impart the knowledge gained.“I find that this method is better and will enhance what we have been using. It is good exposure for me and my colleagues; I love it. So far, we have gone through some safety precautions measure using less lethal options such as the baton. Throughout the remainder of the week, we will be exposed to other techniques,” she informed. Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting (left); Charge d’ Affaires at the United States Embassy in Kingston, Elizabeth Lee Martinez; and Commissioner of Police, Dr. Carl Williams (2nd right), look on while a member of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) points out the items in his non-lethal kit. A total of 3,500 kits, donated by the United States Government, are being utilised in a week-long training course in non-lethal force, which was officially launched on November 13, at the National Police College in St. Catherine. RelatedPolice Deploy Additional Resources to Bog Walklast_img read more

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TT Postscript: 72 a round of many adjectives

first_imgFARMINGDALE, N.Y. – Ouch. No more words need to be said. Or typed. But I’ll still try. Tiger Woods shot an opening 2-over 72 Thursday at the PGA Championship at Bethpage Black. It looked bad, then good, then great, then ended poorly. Here are some things I think I think after Tiger’s first competitive round in 32 days: • If you just looked at the final score you may not be so discouraged. But once you break it down, you quickly will be if you’re a Tiger fan. The biggest thing to be discouraged about is that Tiger is nine shots behind leader Brooks Koepka. That’s a big problem. Huge. • The double bogey on the first hole was deserved. He hit a bad tee shot, poked his approach up the fairway, and then hit an awful wedge shot over the green and failed to get up and down. Immediately, it seemed like there was much competitive rust. • After birdie at 15, he recorded another double bogey on the par-3 17th hole (his eighth hole of the day) when his tee shot was in a terrible spot in the bunker. He took a mighty swing and the ball found the back of the green, but he promptly three-putted from there. • Birdie, birdie, par, eagle was how Tiger started his second nine holes. Bogey, par, bogey, bogey, par was how he ended it. PGA Championship: Scores | Full coverage • Tiger had three three-putts on the round, each time missing from that 5- to 8-foot range. • About the Wednesday no-show, Tiger said: “I got a little bit sick, so I decided to stay home.” Twenty-four hours after his agent said he was not sick. • More Tiger: “It wasn’t as clean as I’d like to have it for sure. Didn’t get off to a very good start. It was a good drive and ended up in a bad spot, and I compounded the problem with trying to use the backboard behind the hole there and missing a putt I should have made. And then found my way back around. Got it back under par for the day, and let a couple slip away with a couple bad putts and a couple mistakes at the end.” • Round 2 begins at 1:49 p.m. ET. Going to have 24 hours to stew about this one, then get to go out and watch Tiger while also witnessing Brooks continue to do what Tiger used to do to people.last_img read more

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A Follow-Up Question on Evolutionary Ethics

first_img Recommended Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share Requesting a (Partial) Retraction from Darrel Falk and BioLogos Origin of Life: Brian Miller Distills a Debate Between Dave Farina and James Tour Share Thoughtful reader Paul, a university freshman in the U.K., asks about Michael Egnor’s article from last year, “From the Annals of Evolutionary Ethics.” I have recently been studying the topic of morality, specifically whether or not objective moral values and duties exist. I have found many sources favouring the view of relative morality, but few supporting the existence of objective moral values and duties.“A Simple Issue”Per the reader’s request, I asked Michael Egnor to “defend the reality of objectively real morals.” Dr. Egnor’s answer:I see it as a very simple issue. If there is objective moral law, then acts are right or wrong in themselves.If there is no objective moral law, then moral law is just individual opinion. Of course, an individual may have the opinion that all people ought to do X, but that’s just one opinion out of 7 billion opinions. Who is to say what opinions ”ought” to be done? We could vote, but there’s no reason to apply democratic reasoning to moral law (the Holocaust was fairly popular in Berlin in the early 1940s and would undoubtedly have prevailed in a referendum).Since there is no rational way to adjudicate moral law if it is merely individual opinions, moral relativism always boils down to power. “X is right” because I, who believe X is right, am stronger than you, who believe X is wrong. If you disagree, I’ll beat you up.If objective moral law is not real, then nothing is right or wrong in itself. Killing innocent people, raping babies, torturing puppies is merely a matter of taste, like preference in ice cream. “I hate genocide!” has the same probity as “I hate pistachio!”If you don’t believe in objective moral law, a law outside of human opinion, that’s fine. But then you are forced to acknowledge that your opinion on genocide/puppy assault/rape, etc., has the same moral standing as your opinion on art or ice cream. Opinion is opinion, and if you want to decide whose opinion wins, let’s arm wrestle.If moral law is real, then genocide and rape are really wrong, in themselves, no matter what anyone thinks. But if 1) moral law is real, then there must be 2) a lawgiver.That’s the problem for moral relativists. They don’t want to admit 2, so they deny 1.It’s a simple matter. The literature may be interesting, but it’s just simple logic really.By the way, if you don’t think that genocide would have been popular if put to a vote in Germany, read Daniel Goldhagen’s eye-opening book, Hitler’s Willing Executioners: Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust.Photo: Entrance to Auschwitz II-Birkenau death camp, by Nelson Pérez [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons. TagsAdolf HitlerAuschwitz II-BirkenauBerlinDaniel Goldhagenevolutionary ethicsgenocideGermansGermanyHitler’s Willing ExecutionersHolocaustlawgiverMichael EgnorMoral Lawmoral relativistsmoralitypistachiorape,Trending Congratulations to Science Magazine for an Honest Portrayal of Darwin’s Descent of Mancenter_img Email Print Google+ Linkedin Twitter Share “A Summary of the Evidence for Intelligent Design”: The Study Guide Culture & Ethics Jane Goodall Meets the God Hypothesis Evolution A Follow-Up Question on Evolutionary EthicsDavid [email protected]_klinghofferOctober 3, 2019, 3:00 PM A Physician Describes How Behe Changed His MindLife’s Origin — A “Mystery” Made AccessibleCodes Are Not Products of PhysicsIxnay on the Ambriancay PlosionexhayDesign Triangulation: My Thanksgiving Gift to Alllast_img read more

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