James Bias

first_imgJames Bias earned his wings Saturday, July 6, 2013 at 6:20 p.m. surrounded by his family. A native of Branch, Louisiana, he moved to Beaumont, TX and later became a resident of Port Arthur, TX. He was a cement finisher, contractor, and proud owner of Po Boys Construction. He was a member of St. James Catholic Church.    A visitation is scheduled for Saturday, July 13, 2013 from 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel. Mass of Celebration will be held at 11 a.m. at St. James Catholic Church with Father James Coon officiating. Burial will follow in Live Oak Cemetery under the direction of Gabriel Funeral Home.   He was preceded in death by his parents James Bias Sr. and Lorena Pickney; first wife Viola Bias, brother Marshall Bias, sisters Irene Martin and Laura Ward, and son Michael James Guidry.   He is survived by his loving and devoted wife Wilma S. Bias; three daughters Evangelist Laura Bias, Debra Guidry, and Paula Anderson; and son Lee Guidry; three sisters Mary Melvo, Rose and Sharon Bias; one brother Joseph Guidry; 18 grandchildren, 28 great grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, relatives, and friends.last_img read more

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Valrie Jean LeBlanc

first_imgValrie Jean LeBlanc, 69 passed away on Thursday, March 3rd 2016 at Memorial Herman Hospital in Houston, TX.  She was a native of Port Arthur, TX and graduate of Lincoln High School.Graveside services will be Friday, March 18, 2016 at 10:00 AM at Live Oak Memorial Park with Pastor Thurman Bartie, officiating.She leaves to mourn: Uncle Woodrow Parker of Houston, TX, and a host of other relatives and friends.Arrangements entrusted to Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.last_img

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Ronnie Leon Anderson

first_imgRonnie Leon Anderson Next Up Ronnie Leon Anderson of Nederland, Texas passed away on Friday, May 13, 2016 at the Medical Center of Southeast Texas. Ronnie was born in El Paso, Texas to the late Leon Earl Anderson and Mildred Emily Anderson. Heaven has gained an angel and he will be missed by all his family. He is survived by his son Ronnie Leon Anderson (Cathy), daughter Paula Rae Anderson (Gary), son Donnie Matthew Anderson (Cammy), brother Donnie Earl Anderson, sister Rhonda Rae Bellows (Mike), sister Carol Ann Baker, along with his grandchildren Cameron Anderson, Lucas Anderson, Isaac Anderson, Chloe Anderson, and Reilly Anderson. He was a 1966 graduate of Irvin High School and a Vietnam veteran.A gathering of the family and friends will be held Tuesday, May 17, 2016 from 5-8 p.m. at Melancon’s Funeral Home in Nederland. The funeral service will be held Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 1:15 p.m. at Houston National Cemetery in Houston, Texas.last_img read more

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Denton’s touchdown gets Bridge City past Silsbee

first_imgThe Orange LeaderBRIDGE CITY — “How ‘bout them Cardinals.”Those were the words Bridge City coach Dwayne Dubois echoed to the Cardinals after Friday night’s District 10-4A Division I showdown with the Silsbee Tigers. In a game that will go down as one of the best victories in the history of Bridge City, quarterback Byron Trahan connected with Hunter Denton on a 37-yard touchdown strike with 0:35 remaining and the Cardinals saw a 35-yard field goal go astray by Silsbee kicker Brady Carter as time expired as Bridge City muscled their way to a 42-41 victory to gain sole possession of first-place in 10-4A at Larry Ward Stadium.Trailing 41-35 and taking over at their own 26 with 2:03 left the Cardinals powered their way to the Tiger 37 thanks to a pair of Denton 10-yard runs.On first-and-10 from the 37, Trahan rolled slightly to the right and threw a perfect pass to Denton along the right side just before the end zone. Denton, who was covered well, made an outstanding catch for the score. Kicker Alferedo Heraldez then put the Cardinals ahead. Silsbee moved the ball from its own 39 all the way down to the Cardinal 18 thanks to big efforts from All-State running back Calvin Tyler and quarterback Willie Jones.With 0:02 remaining, Carter attempted the possible game-winning field goal but it went wide left and the Cardinals (5-2, 3-0) erupted in celebration.How fitting was it that the Cardinals outgained by one yard. Bridge City rolled up 504 total yards while the Tigers had 503.“Phew, what a game,” said Dubois. “Our kids, what more can you say, battled and battled and battled against a darn good football team tonight. We’re a good ballclub too. What a tremendous win, we, as a staff, couldn’t be prouder of our kids.”center_img The Cardinals will be back at home for Senior Night next week when they host the Navasota Rattlers while Silsbee will take on Huffman Hargrave.ORANGEFIELD 27, HAMSHIRE-FANNETT 16ORANGEFIELD — The Orangefield Bobcats beat the Hamshire-Fannett Longhorns 27-16 in a tough run-heavy game Friday night in District 12-4A Divison II action.The Bobcats (4-4, 1-1) utilized a strong performance by their offensive line to take down the Longhorns (1-8, 0-3), who battled hard.The win puts the Bobcats in excellent position to get one of the four-playoff spots out of the five-team 12-4A.Tailback Wesley Frillou lead the Bobcats in rushing yards with 177 while fullback Christopher McGee was the next highest rusher at 100 yards even.The Bobcats piled up 358 total yards, all of it via their dominating running game.Meanwhile, the Bobcat defense rose up, limiting the Longhorns to just 176 total yards, 141 of it on the ground.The Orangefield defense came up big with an interception and two fumble recoveries to ensure the victory over the Longhorns.Bobcat kicker Jacob Rainey was perfect with two field goals from 34 yards out and 22 yards out, and four PATs to make sure the Bobcats stayed ahead.Orangefield returns to the field at Hardin-Jefferson next Friday.•Also Friday: Hull-Daisetta 46, Sabine Pass 12.last_img read more

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ASK A COP — Not illegal to play Pokémon in vehicle

first_img Join Officer Antoine for Ask A Cop Live on KSAP 96.9 FM, “The Breeze” radio station, every Tuesday for 1.5 hours from 1–2:30 p.m. Tune in and listen as Officer Antoine discusses in detail the newly released Ask A Cop article that printed in The News. You can also tune in via Internet at www.ksapthebreeze.org. Feel free to call in and ask your question live to Officer Antoine at 409-982-0247. Remember to email your questions to [email protected], or call 409-983-8673 and leave a message or voice mail question, or mail them to: Ofc. Rickey Antoine, 645 Fourth St., Port Arthur, Texas, 77640. If you happen to see me in public you can Ask A Cop! Debra from Port Neches asks: Officer Antoine I’ve been wanting to ask you a question for some time now about playing games while in a motor vehicle. My son got me hooked on a game called Pokémon and now I love to play Pokémon. This game involves traveling some distance from place to place trying to locate the different Pokémon. I can understand that it probably looks strange to onlookers for a car to drive in circles and start and stop frequently, but is it illegal to play this sort of game while on the roads in Texas?Answer: Good question, Debra! The mere thought of playing a game while on the roadways of Texas gives me nightmares, but currently there is no law in the Texas Transportation Code that outlaws playing Pokémon while operating a motor vehicle. Debra, believe me when I tell you that you’re not alone being hooked on playing Pokémon. We frequently receive calls from citizens for suspicious activity from people and vehicles, and after the investigation is completed it’s found that the suspects were just playing Pokémon! Debra you can’t blame those who call the police because some strange vehicle parked in front of their home leaves and returns or goes to the other side of the street and parks. Keep in mind that this is done in the nighttime hours, and that’s when traffic is lighter and suspicious activity is observed more frequently. Debra, if you are not parking on the wrong side of the road or impeding the flow of traffic, and observing the remaining transportation codes it is totally legal to play Pokémon on the roads of Texas. Debra while playing Pokémon always be aware of your surroundings.James from Port Arthur asks: Officer Antoine I have a question regarding school zones’ flashing lights. I encountered flashing school zone lights long after the end of the school times. I’m not totally sure if we’re still supposed to obey the school zone since the lights are flashing in the school zone. I’m a law-abiding citizen and respect our school zones for the safety of our children. Are we always supposed to obey the flashing lights in the school zones? Answer: Good question James! Thanks for striving to be part of the solution of the traveling problem we have in Port Arthur and Southeast Texas. James you’re not alone. Many motorists aren’t quite sure what to do when the flashing yellow school zones warning lights flash after the posted school zone times. I know I’m right because I pass motorist often who drive the school zone speed limit at 6 p.m. when the light are off the timer! James the flashing yellow lights in a school zone are an attention-grabber — they are for caution. The yellow lights are not the law. Now, the times that are posted on the sign? THEY are the law! James you should operate your vehicle always in accordance to the times on the sign, not according to the lights, because the lights may malfunction and not come on at the beginning of the school zone time or stop flashing at the end of school zone time. But the sign times in school zones will always be the same morning, noon and night!Helen from Port Arthur asks: Officer Antoine, my husband and I are always getting into a disagreement when he drives because he doesn’t seem to understand the meaning of the white line at an intersection. Please help us once and for all settle this dilemma Officer Antoine, because he always stops over the white line! What is the white line at an intersection for?Answer: Good question, Helen! I think I can help you and your husband with your disagreement. The solid white line at intersections seems to be a law in Texas that’s often overlooked whether knowingly or unknowingly. There’s actually a reason and law why the white lines are at intersections. Helen, the white line at an intersection is a STOP line, where motorists should STOP behind the white line. Motorists shouldn’t be stopped on any part of the solid white stop line, but behind it. Of course, the white line is at intersections for safety reasons to allow safe passage for pedestrians crossing the road, and for vehicles turning your direction to safely turn in the appropriate lane. So Helen, if your husband is stopping on or beyond the white stop line at intersections, he definitely is in violation of a state law in Texas.last_img read more

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Thresa Julia Honish Cutaia

first_img She worked for Retail Merchants of Port Arthur and Gem Jewelers of Beaumont.She was a member of St. Henry’s Catholic Church in Bridge City.She liked to read, watch TV, dance, the taste of good wine and baking.Thresa is preceded in death by her parents; her husband Louis Cutaia; brother Alfonse H. Honish Jr.; and grandson, Brice Boudreaux. She was married to Louis Emanuel Cutaia for 46 years.They lived in Bangor, Maine for 4 years while Louis was in the Air Force and where 2 of their children were born.They moved back to Texas where she lived out the rest of her life. Thresa Julia Honish Cutaia of Bridge City, Texas passed away at home at the age of 86.She was born on March 2, 1933 in Port Arthur, Texas to Alfonse H. and Phebie Jacobs Honish.She lived in Bridge City for 43 years.center_img Survivors include her children, Rita Cutaia Trail and husband Robert of Beaumont, TX, Lynda Cutaia Piggott and husband David of Bridge City, TX, Patti Cutaia Hebert and husband David of Nederland, TX, Danny Cutaia of Orange, TX, Ted Cutaia and wife Sandra of Port Neches, TX, Judy Cutaia Mitchell and husband Michael of Deer Park, TX, PeggyCutaia Thompson and husband Glen of Deer Park, TX; her sisters, Phebie Marie Honish Bodin and Ann Honish LeVand both of Hallettsville, TX; her brother, Paul Honish of LaMarque, TX; she also leaves behind a host of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews.A visitation for family and friends will begin at 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, October 30, 2019 at Levingston Funeral Home in Groves followed by the funeral service at 11:00 a.m. with Reverend Steve Leger officiating.Burial will follow at St. Mary Catholic Cemetery inOrange, TX.last_img read more

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Cases of COVID-19 hit 35 in Port Arthur & Mid-County; check out the details

first_imgThe cases of COVID-19 confirmed in Port Arthur and Mid-County reached 35 on Friday, authorities said.Port Arthur leads the way with 22 cases. Nederland and Groves each have five, while Port Neches has three.The latest reports were released by the Southeast Texas Regional Emergency Operations Center, which consolidates all information related to COVID-19 activities in Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Newton, Orange and Tyler counties. Authorities said the call center received 99 calls on Friday.Citizens are encouraged to call 409-550-2536 for an appointment for testing. The Call Center is open 24-hours, seven days a week.If you are looking for information about COVID-19, call 211, option 6 or visit covid-19-jeffco.hub.arcgis.com.last_img read more

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Chater-Lea rebirths British-made classic in premium Grand Tour pedals

first_imgFirst making high quality cycling components in the UK as early as 1890, a new chapter gets under way as Chater-Lea steps back onto the bike with new Grand Tour flat pedals. Building on more than a century in cycling, a new team is bringing the brand back, having mined the classic Chater-Lea catalog for products that could be update with modern manufacturing quality & precision. It all starts with a premium pair of pedals, but there is much more in store…Chater-Lea retro classic Grand Tour pedals, Made in UKc. Chater-LeaIf you know the Chater-Lea brand at all, it probably holds a place in your mind as a high-quality British classic. If it is new to you, Chater-Lea is set to re-school you on British-made cycling components, with a level of fit & finish designed to last a lifetime. These aren’t meant to be components for your latest aero carbon race bike, but are more likely to adorn a timeless retro steel or titanium ride around town, or even off on tour.The new Chater-Lea’s first product is a classic ‘rat trap’ design pedal called the Grand Tour, inspired by the brand’s ubiquitous past pedals. The idea was to start with a simple, yet iconic product, as a direct descendant of the original. And the new pedals carry over the classic look with the CL logo laser cut into the pedal body, but now backed up by some meaty teeth for solid grip underfoot.Flat pedals haven’t really evolved so far from the brand’s early days, as you can essentially thread a half century old pedal into almost any modern crankset. Chater-Lea also said that with the benefit of being able to analyze their pedals that had been in use for 80 years, it have them the opportunity to even improve on the classic design.Like their long running pedals, the Grand Tour features fully serviceable, open ball bearings packed with modern waterproof grease. They are machined from the most corrosion-resistant 316 & hardened 17-4PH stainless steel, now entirely made in the UK on much more modern machinery.The new Grand Tour pedals are definitely a premium product, and come with the matching £250 / 290€ pricetag to prove it. A redeeming bit, Chater-Lea is entirely confident in their modern British craftsmanship & attention to detail, and the new pedals come with a lifetime original-owner warranty. The new pedals will be the first product available from the new Chater-Lea, and will be sold consumer direct only in four weeks.The Grand Tour is only the first in the pipeline for the rebirth of Chater-Lea. A matching set of toe-clips & straps will be the next addition, giving you good foot retention (maybe for an Eroica build.) Machined crankarms and chainrings based on modern standards are also expected this summer.ChaterLea.comlast_img read more

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Review: Votec VRC all-road bike finds happy medium versatility, between road & gravel

first_imgWhen Votec debuted their carbon VRC endurance road bike back in midsummer, we wondered just how off-road ready the all-road bike would be. Coming off the heels of a successful & affordable VRX gravel bike that sold out faster than they could keep up, Votec has refocused on what they do best – reasonably-priced drop bar bikes for mixed surface riding. Thus, this new Votec Road Carbon… VRC bike finds a nice all-road sweet spot, balancing geometry that is stable yet quick from smooth asphalt, to dirt roads, to even a bit of proper gravel…2020 Votec VRC a carbon endurance road bike for all-roadsVotec calls the VRC their ideal take on what a modern road bike should be, venturing more into all-road for the increased versatility over any road surface. Figuring out what is the difference between an all-road and a gravel bike often comes down to personal preference, how you want to ride, and just how gnarly your gravel is going to get…Some gravel riders like to push the limits into terrain that might be better suited by a proper mountain bike…photo by Stephan Geiß…while others might just be riding rough asphalt & cobblestones, or hunting the holy grail of buff dirt & gravel roads away from car traffic.Personally, I don’t really like being confined to one type of road or another. And that’s probably where the Votec VRC shines best, with a quick-feeling road ride feel that’s happy to get dirty when necessary.Endurance all-road geometryTo make the mix of on-road handling work with off-road capabilities, Votec mixes mostly road-like steep-ish angles with a slightly forward position, endurance-focused wheelbase & a lot of bottom bracket drop. Frame reaches tend to be a bit compact for similarly sized road bikes (or especially compared to gravel bikes), with slightly longer endurance-oriented chainstays to fit big tire clearances in and a slightly longer wheelbase similar to other modern endurance road bikes.My medium test bike for example was a bit more slack that many road-only bikes with a 72° headtube, which paired with short 378mm frame reach & all-road-ready 414mm chainstays, yet a short for all-road 991mm wheelbase.(For comparison with two similarly focused endurance road bikes I’ve spent time on recently – the medium Canyon Endurace gets a 73° headtube, 382mm reach, 415mm stays & 990mm wheelbase; the medium Merida Scultura Endurance gets a 73° headtube, 380mm reach, 418mm stays & 1001mm wheelbase.)photo by Stephan GeißThe result is that I put on a 10mm longer than stock steam and was rewarded with a stable position on the bike and a slightly forward weight balance that lent a quick but predictable feel to handling, on or off-road – a happy medium.All-road setup OverviewThe version of the new Votec all-road bike I spent the second half of the summer riding was a medium VRC Pro in Norwegian blue that retails for 3000€. Outfitted with a Shimano Ultegra mid-compact 52/36T crankset & wide enough 11-30 cassette, it offered a good gearing range for varied terrain, but definitely leans towards hard surface road riding.My test bike was equipped with the standard 19mm internal alloy Mavic Ksyrium wheels, but had 32mm WTB Expanse tires on it rather than the stock 30mm Vittoria Corsa Controls – presumably because Votec knew I wasn’t likely to stick to the tarmac. To experiment a bit in more versatility, I also spent time with some 33mm knobby Greim Pro cyclocross tires and 35mm G-One Allround gravel tires fitted – covering a broader range of all roads.Votec VRC Pro – Tech detailsphoto by Stephan GeißA number of unique details stand out on the VRC, like the ‘VR Knot’ seat cluster that incorporates a conventional-clamping seatpost binder that sits flush with the toptube, and also allows the seatstays to slip past for additional comfort. The VR-Knot was easy to adjust and didn’t give me any troubles (like some wedge-style clamps can). And the decoupling of seatstays from the seattube surely made it feel like rough road vibrations didn’t make it up to the saddle.photo by Stephan GeißThe VRC has internal cable routing with a single modular port in common spot at the top of the downtube. But its fork routing is a bit more unique, with a small flat section of the crown extended out to the side, allowing for the front brake line to drop straight down into the top of the fork, while staying clear of the headtube.One detail feature that seems a bit odd now is the VRC’s adopting of Mavic’s Speed Release quick release thru-axle standard. A good idea mixing the benefits of QRs & security of thru-axles without having to set you axle down on the ground when you take a wheel out, SpeedRelease never really caught on. All of the stock VRC builds do include Mavic wheels though, and the system works really well. And Votec does offer separate 12mm bolt-on axles that make the bike compatible with any other standard thru-axle wheels.VRC Pro – Actual weightWith tubes inside of the slightly larger than stock WTB tires, my medium test bike weighed in at 8.59kg (18.9lb). That’s just 200g more than Votec’s claim, and for sure setting the bike up tubeless with the included valves will make up for it, although it is unclear if the stock Vittoria tires are the TLR version.Riding Impressions on the Votec VRCMost of the kilometers I rode on the VFC were actually on-road (seriously, I realize these photos may be a bit deceiving), but I can’t think of a single ride I took on the bike that didn’t leave the tarmac at least once. That’s really where the VRC shines – riding quiet dead-end backroads, then connecting with a dirt road alongside a farmer’s field or gravel road through the forest to the next village.photo by Stephan GeißNow don’t get me wrong. As I alluded to back in July with my first impressions on the all-road VRC – Votec is pretty clear that this isn’t actually meant to be a gravel bike. Even with room for 35mm tires plus a decent amount of clearance you can fit pretty off-road capable tires in here – this VRC rides best on the road with something around a 30-32mm tire.That seems to hot the sweet spot for quick on-road feel, smoothing out rough riding surfaces, and still feeling fast over hardpack dirt & gravel sectors.There is room for mud though, especially if you swap in a set of cross tires. I personally felt better with a semi slick tread than these mud tires, because the low BB height is going to keep you from doing anything crazy off-road in any case. Bigger gravel tires like the 35mm G-One added extra volume, but didn’t really improve the ride enough to be worth the reduced clearance.And about the only real nit to pick if you want to run off-road-ready tires near that 35mm upper limit, would probably be the potential for toe overlap. A result of the short reach/short front center dimension combined with larger diameter tires on the VRC is the dreaded toe overlap.I normally ride a medium road/all-road bike and am used to almost 1cm more of frame reach. Instead of sizing up the frame, I sized up the stem, and stuck with an M. The result was that when I mounted taller CX tires, my size 43 shoe (with cleats pretty far back) crossed paths with the front tire. It was never actually an issue while riding, but something that doesn’t happen often in M or larger bikes. But mixing big tires with a compact front end, and it is no huge surprise.But I would recommend riders on the bubble about size choice, to size up to keep it from happening.The VRC is ready to ride any road. There’s no bikepacking or other major adventure accessory mounts (although it does have hidden full-coverage fender mounts). No 650b gravel wheel compatibility.It is a road bike. Just one for any and all roads – a bike with a surprisingly comfortable rear end that makes slipping off-road feasible to extend the reach of your road rides, much thanks to fast-rolling, gravel-capable tires.While the VRC isn’t really a gravel bike, it does hint of what could possibly be in the works from Votec for heading further off-road. Their alloy VRX was quite popular, and I’ve spotted a few riders tackling a good bit of gravel on this all-road bike. I wouldn’t be surprised to see a large volume, more knobby tire evolution of this bike in the future – taking advantage of the VRC’s unique design features, with maybe even more comfort over bumpier terrain…The new carbon VRC all-road bike is available now, direct from Votec in five stock sizes (S-XXL), three different colors, four complete bike builds – with pretty much all versions in stock and available for delivery across Europe now. For full details on pricing & options can be found in our original in-depth tech coverage of the Votec VRC launch from July here.Votec.delast_img read more

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Ceramic coated alloy brake rotors? Carbon backed brake pads? Oh yeah!

first_imgCeramic coated aluminum bicycle rims have been around for decades, offering higher friction and durability for improved braking performance. Then disc brakes took over, offering vastly superior performance. But what if you combined the two? That’s one of the trends we saw at Taipei Cycle Show, and here are two brands with a variety of clever disc brake upgrades…Above is the ceramic coated aluminum disc brake rotor from HSC (Huang Chieh Metal), which uses a bit of venting on the braking surface and an 8-arm structure to maximize stiffness. They use a MAO (Mico Arc Oxidation process to bond the ceramic material to the aluminum, which they developed to be able to offer these at a reasonable cost.But why do this? Aluminum is not only lighter than the typical steel rotor, it also dissipates heat better. But, it makes a lousy braking surface. Adding the ceramic coating gives it much more friction, increases its durability, and according to their testing reduces the amount of force you need to apply at the lever by about half to accomplish the same stopping distance in dry conditions. Wet weather performance is also supposedly better.HCM’s ceramic-alloy rotors come in at a claimed weight of 95g. We like the potential of this proven rim brake technology coming to rotors that are 2/3 or less the weight of a traditional steel rotor.HCM also makes multi-material rotors, sandwiching an aluminum core between stainless steel braking surfaces. This new version exposes more of the alloy inside the center, helping to cool it even faster. It’s similar to Shimano’s ICE rotor tech, but without the giant fins.Brakco Ceramic Rotors & Carbon PadsBrakco was another brand showing off ceramic alloy rotors, but with a few tweaks. Their rotors have a nice rounded edge that should keep the UCI happy, and a slotted design to shed crud. They’re also offering it with either a full 7075 alloy carrier or a combo carbon/alloy carrier. Claimed weights are as low as 49g (140mm) and 72g (160mm) for the alloy carrier, and drop even more for the carbon/alloy version…45g (140mm) and 68g (160mm)!Both Brakco and HCM rotors require special brake pads to work with these MAO rotors.Brakco also had these carbon fiber backed brake pads for the usual Shimano and SRAM calipers, with various pad materials on offer. The benefit? Much less heat transmission from pad to fluid. And bragging rights. Because carbon. The trick with these? They’re mostly an OEM manufacturer, so you’ll have to hope another brand picks these up. Or start importing them yourself and slap your own label on them.last_img read more

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