Jam Cruise 12 Lineup Announced

first_imgThe festival that trumps every other festival has finally announced its much anticipated lineup.  Jam Cruise 12‘s lineup has been officially announced.  And what a lineup it is!  This year we can expect epic performances from a slew of artists including Galactic, Thievery Corporation, Robert Randolph and The Family Band, Lotus, Gigantic Underground Conspiracy, Anders Osborne, The New Mastersounds, Pork Tornado, The Wailers, Anders Osborne, Les Claypool’s Duo De Twang and many more.To add the icing on the cake, there will also be a “Surprise Show” on the private island that the boat stops at. What act/s this could wind up being is anybody’s guess, and simply leaves so much to the imagination that we can’t even begin to comprehend.  Jam Cruise is known for pulling out all the stops, and we expect this year to be no different, as we set sail out of Miami from January 4-9th, and bask in the Caribbean sun.  Is it January yet?Check out our coverage from last year’s mind-blowing experience and see just why this is the best festival around.  Here is the link to book your cabins.  Jam Cruise 12 may be moving to a bigger ship, but when we say this is going to sell out, and you should get on board immediately, we mean it!Watch the official lineup announcement video here:Official Jam Cruise 12 Lineup:Thievery CorporationGalacticRobert Randolph and the Family BandGeorge Porter Jr.The New MastersoundsLes Claypool’s Duo De TwangKarl Denson’s Tiny UniverseThe RevivalistsAnders OsborneRob Garza (Solo DJ Sets)ConspiratorGigantic Underground ConspiracyBootsy Collins & The Funk Unity BandLotusThe WailersKeller WilliamsKeller and the KimocksLettuceDumpstaphunkDJ Logic and John PopperThe Infamous StringdustersALOMarchForth Marching BandOrgonePork TornadoBoneramaRobert Walter’s 20th CongressMonophonicsMike Dillon BandEric Krasno BandEveryone OrchestraAlan Evans Super JamNathan MooreBrock ButlerCyril NevilleBill EvansOteil BurbridgeWill BernardAlecia ChakourSkerikMaster Class At Sea (Artist At Large): Col. Bruce, Kofi Burbridge, Butch Trucks, Victor Wooten, Luther and Cody Dickinsonlast_img read more

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Stevie Wonder to Perform ‘Songs in the Key of Life’ at Annual Charity Event

first_imgTrue to his name, the beloved and still groovin’ 63 year old musical legend Stevie Wonder, has been known to engage in wonderful charitable work, especially during the holiday season. The music icon has just announced that he will be performing his 1976 album, Songs in the Key of Life, at his annual House Full of Toys benefit concert on December 21st at the Nokia Theatre in LA.This announcement has come as a treat to all Wonder fans, for this is the first time the 21 song album, which was ranked 57th on Rolling Stone Magazine’s greatest albums of all time list, will be performed in its entirety. And as if this all wasn’t exciting enough, artists featured on the original album have been booked to play alongside Wonder, as well as other artists that have yet to be announced.The event, which collects and distributes unwrapped gifts for people in need, is one among many of the noble acts Steve Wonder has participated in recently. His performance at the Global Citizen Festival in Central Park this year, which was sponsored by an anti-poverty organization, resulted in the loud and hopeful cries of fans, in which he responded, “Together we can work it out, we will reach our higher ground!”Tickets for the House Full of Toys benefit concert go on sale Nov 1.last_img read more

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Bruce Springsteen – High Hopes

first_imgWhen Bruce Springsteen announces a new album, it comes with certain expectations. High Hopes, if you will. We want to hear Bruce’s languishing voice, powerfully lamenting through pop-rock ballads. We want that ol’ down-home comfortable folksy feeling. More than anything, we want to be moved… swept away with the Boss.So, does the singer/songerwriter’s 18th studio album live up to the expectations?High Hopes opens with the title track, an upbeat rocker that opens with a slow-building groovy jungle drum beat and industrial guitar work from Tom Morello. Morello, the guitarist from Rage Against the Machine, plays a large role on the new album. The meat of the song drops in with an uplifting melody from the horn section, fast-paced with a tinge of darkness. It’s a good song, with some excellent Morello guitarwork sprinkled throughout.Overall, the album is good. Some of the songs, like “Harry’s Place” and “American Skin (41 Shots)” drag a little bit, taking too long to get to that big moment. Others, like “Frankie Fell In Love” and “Just Like Fire Would,” are so typical Bruce Springsteen that, out of context, they could easily be mistaken for classic tunes from the 70′s.High Hopes is definitely worth a listen. You can stream the album in full through CBS.com until its January 14th release date, or tune into The Good Wife this weekend (1/12) to hear the television debut of three of the album’s songs. You’ll hear some great tunes if you listen, including “The Ghost of Tom Joad,” which has an exciting chorus and more great guitar work from Morello. But another song, “Down in The Hole,” has a solemn string section that mainly serves to slow down the entire track.The Boss is certainly trying. The latest album is an earnest contribution, and uniquely Bruce Springsteen. If you already loved The Boss, then you’ll love High Hopes. His effort to include a edgier sound, with the inclusion of Tom Morello, is readily apparent on a number of tracks. Morello’s guitar-playing certainly stands out, as he is a master of his trade.It’s a nice album with good songs, but none of them are particularly noteworthy. Still, The Boss is The Boss, and this one is definitely worth checking out.-David Melamed (@DMelamz)last_img read more

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Listen: Trey Anastasio Band Debuts New Tune In Pittsburgh, ‘Speak To Me’

first_imgTrey Anastasio Band have been gearing up for a new album release in early 2015, kicking off a fall tour last weekend with stops in Chicago (on 11/28) and Pittsburgh (on 11/29). At Stage AE in Pittsburgh, Anastasio debuted a new tune (presumably from the new album), called “Speak To Me.”Unlike the Pink Floyd song from Dark Side, this upbeat funky-rocker is driven by horns and even includes a hand-clap sound effect from Anastasio. The set also featured the bust-out of “Come As Melody,” which hadn’t been played since 2006.Thanks to taper Scott Toney, audio for the new tune “Speak To Me,” as well as the entire show, can be downloaded via Bt.Etree.org. Check out the full set list below:TAB Pittsburgh Setlist (via Phish.net)Set One: Corona > Sand, Valentine, Night Speaks to a Woman, Pigtail, Cayman Review, Burn That Bridge, Dark and Down, Burlap Sack and Pumps, Bounce, Come As Melody, TuesdaySet Two: The Song, Speak To Me[1], Gotta Jibboo, Gone, Liquid Time, Traveler, Last Tube, Plasma, Shine, Clint Eastwood, First TubeEncore: Black Dog[1] Debut.[via Jambase]last_img read more

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Orgone Lays Down The Funk In Atlanta

first_imgOrgone funkified the crowd at Atlanta’s Terminal West with the bill supported by Sophistafunk earlier this week, May 6th. The eight-piece band hit hard from the first note of “Meat Machine,” delivering an extraordinary set. The talented band has an extensive studio collection, but nothing compares to the group’s live energy.Orgone brought tracks from their most recent album, Beyond the Sun, and even played a cover of Gwen McCrae’s “Keep the Fire Burning.” Dale Jennings’ bass lines were on point, Sergio Risos’s guitar riffs were out of sight, Darren Cardoza & Paul Chandler blared those jazzy horns, Dan Hastie jammed that stride piano, and of course Adryon De Leon belted killer, soulful vocals. Everyone on stage is having a blast, performing the funk music with passion. Orgone got me funking hooked.If Orgone is playing near you, take the trip and enjoy the funk out of some individuals that put on of hell of a show! Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Top 20 Photos From Nile Rodgers’ FOLD Festival

first_imgDestiny Arts Center Dancers:CHIC w/ Paloma Faith:CHIC w/ Keith Urban: Thomas Gold:Beck:Ultra Naté:Grandmaster Melle Mel:Janelle Monae: The inaugural FOLD Festival held this week in Riverhead, NY proved to be a huge success. The fact that it was held on a Tuesday and Wednesday did not appear to be much of a deterrent, as attendees came out in the thousands to see legendary performers like Chic ft. Nile Rodgers (who curated the festival), Chaka Khan, Duran Duran, Beck, Chuck D and tons more. Photographer Greg Horowitz was on the scene to capture it all. Here are our top 20 photos from the 2-day event (full gallery at the bottom).CHIC: Load remaining imagescenter_img Chic w/ Chaka Khan:Chic w/ Chaka Khan:Chuck D:Duran Duran: Pharrell:Nile Rodgers and Pharrell:CHIC:last_img read more

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Warren Haynes Brings Bluegrass To The Capitol Theatre

first_imgWarren Haynes has been a busy man this year.  Not only has he performed all over the festival circuit this past summer, but he recently released his third solo album, Ashes and Dust.  Last night at The Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY, he introduced his inviting musical experience, full of bluegrass and Americana. The backdrop of the stage had a rock wall appearance, and the colors were ever-changing.  ChessBoxer, who later joined Haynes’ on stage, opened the evening.  This folk group from Nashville, TN brought the audience on a musical adventure with their crisp bluegrass sound. This three man band featured Matt Menefee on banjo, Royal Masat on upright bass, and Ross Holmes on fiddle.  They wandered around tones filled with heavy fiddle picking to heavier grooves which pounded out energy that touched deep into your soul.  They were a musical appetizer that got the audience into the bluegrass/folk theme of the evening.  ChessBoxer’s ‘Apollo’ EP Is Bluegrass At Its Most RighteousChris Stapleton, former member of the Grammy nominated bluegrass group, The SteelDrivers, took the stage next.  His deep, soulful voice took the audience on a ride of emotions.  He wound around alt-country tones to a touch of blues and into a country beat throughout his set. His guitar was like a glass of aged whiskey in his hands, as he took his time on slower beats but made it well worth the wait to enjoy. He would then barrel into solid chunks of rock and lay down the energy like nobody’s business. Blood, sweat and tears went into every note throughout his set.  If you haven’t seen Stapleton perform live, run right out and catch his next show.  You will not be disappointed. Warren Haynes and the Ashes & Dust Band, featuring Jeff Sipe (of Leftover Salmon) and ChessBoxer, took the stage and opened up with an Allman Brothers favorite, “Blue Sky”. The opener took a step out of the Allman’s realm for a moment and threw in a nice mix of banjo, along with fiddle, that took over the meat of the song and carried the energy.  The fiddle rosin was getting a good workout throughout the evening, as the strings danced up a storm.  The energy was then tossed over to Haynes’ to carry the dance before the fiddle and guitar played in sync before bringing the song to a close.  It was a high energy start to the set.  The set was packed with varied tones, from the touch of Spanish flair “Patchwork Quilt”, to a slide guitar heavy “One More Cup of Coffee” to a bluegrass “Is It Me or You”. “Coal Tattoo” was a full on immersion in bluegrass love, with the banjo, mandolin, fiddle and upright bass jamming out mid-song. “Instrumental Illness” had jazzy undertones, as each performer danced around the rhythms and showed off their individual talents, followed by a drum solo by Sipe.  The encore included Stapleton joining on stage during “In The Pines”.  The evening closed with a high energy rendition of the Allman Brothers classic, “Jessica”.The music hit all genres during the evening, with a touch of jazz, soulful bluegrass and high energy solos.  Haynes took a step out of his usual role and really changed things up with the evenings performance.  Individual musicians also busted it out solo and provided nuggets of musical treats.  The fiddle and bass created a swirling sensation of psychedelic energy with just these two bluegrass instruments, in tandem with the guitars and electric banjo.  Overall, the evenings performances were a musical delight by taking the audience out of the urban setting and sending them into the throws of an Appalachia jam session.Upcoming tour dates can be found on the Warren Haynes website, and his full setlist can be seen below:Setlist: Warren Haynes and the Ashes & Dust Band at the Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY – 10/1/15Blue Sky, Patchwork Quilt, One More Cup Of Coffee, Is It Me Or You, Company Man, Dusk Till Dawn, Coal Tattoo, You Ain’t Going Nowhere, Stranded In Self-Pity, Ophelia, Skin It Back >No Celebration > Instrumental Illness (with Hottentot tease) > Drums > Spots Of Time (Norwegian Wood tease) Encore: In The Pines (with Chris Stapleton), JessicaPhotography by Sam Shinault, written by Sarah Bourquelast_img read more

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Nik Greeley & The Operators Will Funk Your Face [Video Premiere]

first_imgNik Greeley is arguably one of the best frontmen and performers in Philadelphia, and his band backs him up just as impressively. The super band includes Sam Gutman (keys) and Zach LoPresti (guitar) from Out of the Beardspace, Joe Baldacci on the skins, Andrew Warren on guitar, Freshy behind the bass, and the incredibly enthusiastic Swift Technique horn section, featuring Ian Gray (trombone), Greg Rosen (trumpet), and Jason O’mara (tenor sax).Getting To Know: Out Of The Beardspace’s Totally Unique Musical FusionNik Greeley & The Operators released their debut EP this spring called Town Gypsy. The band’s energetic live performances include a diverse spectrum of rhythm, blues, jazz, and extreme levels of funk, and is one of the most infectious live music experiences you’ll have. Greeley’s voice can be felt from around the block, and his full brass section will fill any room with contagiously electrifying vibes.Having shared stages with George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Gene Ween, Shuggie Otis, Fishbone, Rusted Root, and more, Nik Greeley & The Operators are looking forward to their next gig with Rebirth Brass Band on 12/29 at The Hall at MP. Tickets available here.Check out this exclusive new video, featuring a medley of Greeley’s original “Sex in E” and Jimi Hendrix’s “Voodoo Child”:[Directed by Matthew Lee Pelosi]last_img read more

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Synchronized effort rescues collection

first_imgHeavy rain Saturday night (March 8) caused a large drainpipe to rupture in Pusey Library. More than 500 gallons of water poured into the Harvard Theatre Collection stacks and seeped through the floor, flooding the three levels beneath it. At risk were hundreds of original drawings of costume and set designs, hand-painted theatrical backdrops, and Early American manuscripts and books, including the Emily Dickinson family library from Houghton Library, the University’s rare book depository.Damage to materials was less extensive than it might have otherwise been. With a flood watch set by the National Weather Service, the Harvard College Library (HCL) had arranged for security staff to conduct additional tours of the stacks over the weekend to monitor the libraries for water leaks. When the pipe burst at approximately 7:30 p.m., one of those guards discovered and reported it. Within 20 minutes of the report, HCL Operations was on site with the Library Collections Emergency Team (LCET) arriving shortly after.Like a well-rehearsed dance troupe, each team knew its part. Operations concentrated on stemming the flow of water from the pipe, vacuuming standing water from the affected floors of the library, and lowering humidity levels in the building. HCL Operations Director Paul Bellenoit and team member Andy LaPlume choreographed a custodial clean-up crew that was able to get to work quickly by drawing upon a well-stocked emergency supply closet containing wet vacs, dehumidifiers, folding tables, sheets of plastic, paper towels, and myriad other supplies anticipated for such emergencies. A moving crew was brought in after midnight to move the rain-soaked backdrops and prepare a staging area where they could be unrolled to dry.At the same time, the LCET team, assisted by Houghton librarians and staff members from the Office of the College Librarian, moved collections out of danger and began treating damaged materials. LCET is on call 24 hours a day to provide assistance in emergencies that threaten University library collections. It is comprised of conservators and preservation librarians in the Weissman Preservation Center and in the Preservation & Imaging unit of Harvard College Library. Project conservator Heather Hendry was the team leader Saturday and, together with Carie McGinnis, the Houghton preservation librarian, coordinated salvage and treatment efforts on site with four other LCET members.Finding space to lay out the extensive number of materials, many of them oversized, proved a particular challenge. After employing the full supply of emergency folding tables, LCET members moved out into the main level of Pusey Library, using the corridor floors and every possible tabletop in the reading rooms of the Theatre Collection, the Harvard Map Collection, and the University Archives; the floor of Houghton’s Edison and Newman Room; and a space under construction in Lamont Library.Level 1 of Pusey Library and all adjacent reading rooms were closed to the public until mid-week to allow materials in those spaces time to dry. The Harvard Map Collection, the University Archives, and the Pusey Library main entrance reopened on Wednesday, although some materials, which are cordoned off, are still drying on the corridor floor. The Harvard Theatre Collection, whose materials were most significantly affected, remains closed indefinitely. Materials from the collection that are available to patrons can be paged through the Houghton Reading Room.Rapid response in a water emergency is essential not only because of water damage to the collection and building, but also because of the serious potential for mold. At room temperature there is only a small window for drying and dehumidifying the environment before mold begins to grow. Once it sets in, every piece in the entire area must be disinfected and thoroughly vacuumed to remove mold spores. While water-damaged materials can be treated, mold often renders them impossible to salvage. This situation would have created a particularly difficult job because of the nature of the rare materials stored in that part of the library. The building infrastructure would have required the same time-intensive treatment. Fortunately, the library response teams beat the clock on all counts.— Harvard College Library Communicationslast_img read more

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Film insists U.S. educational system is in critical condition

first_imgLast month Bill Gates warned Congress that the United States is dangerously close to losing its competitive edge due to a serious shortage of scientists and engineers. The problem required in part, said the Microsoft founder, a revamping of the country’s educational system.Robert Compton M.B.A. ’84 couldn’t agree more. So much so that he produced a 54-minute film to spread the word.Education is “the most critical issue facing America,” Compton told a crowd last week gathered to watch the film in the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s (HGSE) Askwith Lecture Hall in Longfellow Hall.“We are not preparing our children for the careers of the 21st century,” he said. “We ignore the global standard of education at our peril.”The Harvard Business School graduate knows what’s at stake.A venture capitalist and entrepreneur with 25 years of experience under his belt, Compton said he has had to consistently hire workers from India and China for his high-tech companies, not for lower wages but for higher brainpower, because he simply can’t “find the talent in the United States.”The notion that something was fundamentally different between the three nations’ approaches to education began to take hold for the businessman after a dinner in India with about 100 software developers. He was stunned by the broad knowledge and high level of intelligence of the 25 to 35-year-old men and women in the room.“They knew more about American history than I did,” Compton said, as he went from table to table chatting with his employees.In 2005 Compton began a tour of the colleges, high schools, and primary schools in India to examine the nation’s educational systems firsthand. The seminal moment came, he said, after a visit to a first-grade class in Bangalore, where he asked the children a simple question: “What do you want to be when you grow up?”The answers were telling. “Engineer, scientist, engineer, cardiologist, engineer, engineer,” he said, were the repeated choices.Impressed by the high career ambitions of the 5- and 6-year-olds, Compton decided to explore with a film how the United States, India, and China prime their students for the future.His documentary, “Two Million Minutes: A Global Examination,” follows the path of six students, a teenage boy and girl from each country, as they prepare for the next step after high school. The title refers to the number of minutes a student has between the completion of the eighth grade and their high school graduation. Compton said his goal wasn’t to compare and critique the different systems but merely to show people what he saw and let them draw their own conclusions by examining how students from each country spend their time.The work caught the attention of Fernando Reimers, Ford Foundation Professor of International Education and director of the HGSE International Education Policy Program, who arranged the screening.The film, Reimers said, encouraged an important dialogue.“Providing students the opportunity to engage in deliberations about the purposes of education is an essential aspect of preparing them to be leaders in the field,” he said.While the two U.S. teens in the film are diligent students and high achievers, it’s clear they live in a decidedly less stringent academic atmosphere.In her bedroom in Carmel, Ind., Brittany, 17, says she is not worried about having perfect SAT scores. Her male counterpart, Neil, is able to work 20 hours week at a local restaurant while he goes to school. Neither is committed to a particular career, though Brittany dreams of becoming a doctor and Neil, a National Merit Scholar finalist, isn’t sure what he will do, but thinks a traditional office job is probably not for him.By contrast, the documentary’s Indian and Chinese students spend much of their waking hours studying. All of them strive to enter a science- or technology-related field. They are urged by their parents to finish at the top and spurred to be the best by the tough competition from their classmates. Jin, who lives in Shanghai, reads the complicated-looking calculus text “Strength in Numbers” every night before bed. Apoorva, 17, is up with the sun on Saturday mornings in Bangalore for tutoring sessions to prepare for college admission exams.The film also consults a number of experts including Richard Freeman, Harvard’s Herbert S. Ascherman Professor of Economics, and Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.Following the screening, Compton took questions from the audience. He admitted to seriously altering the education of his two teenage daughters after his experience with the film, putting more of an emphasis on their math and science studies, and hiring tutors to help them excel.“I think I am doing what’s best for them to expand their career opportunities for the 21st century,” he said.One audience member asked how someone without the same financial means could accomplish that goal.“I think it starts with recognition,” said Compton, adding that educators, politicians, and society in general need to help raise the level of math and science instruction in U.S. school systems. “Our leaders need to produce … the rhetoric and recognition.”Some criticized his view, arguing the emphasis on a technology-based education ignored a well-rounded approach to learning.“I don’t think 40 years ago anybody knew what the economy would look like [today]. I wonder about preparing for the economy of 40 years from now by being just interested in technology,” said Jack P. Shonkoff, Julius B. Richmond FAMRI Professor in Child Health and Development and director of the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.“All I was trying to do was show what I saw,” countered Compton, acknowledging that teaching students ethics, for example, is essential, but referred again to his own experience and his struggle to find qualified workers in the United States.“What I’m saying is I can’t find that talent in the United States. … I think that has profound negative impact for America.”last_img read more

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