Missing 1-year-old girl may be endangered amid ‘suspicious’ death in her home, police say

first_imgAnsonia Police Department(ANSONIA, Conn.) — A 1-year-old girl is missing and Connecticut authorities fear she may be endangered.Venessa Morales, 1, was living inside a home in the city of Ansonia where there is “an active suspicious death investigation,” according to a press release from the Ansonia Police Department on Tuesday.Police said that while Venessa was not in the home, “we have not been able to locate her” since the body was discovered Monday night.Authorities were initially called to the house for a welfare check after family members had not been able to contact the Morales family for a couple of days and “were concerned,” Lynch said.Officers arrived at the home before 8 p.m. and found evidence outside that prompted them to force entry, according to authorities.It was then that they said they found a victim. Authorities would not say how the victim is related to Venessa.Family members told police the little girl “was always at the house,” Lynch said.Authorities are waiting for the medical examiner to determine the official cause and manner of death into the victim.Ansonia is located about 10 miles west of New Haven.Venessa has brown hair and brown eyes, police said.Anyone with information is asked to contact the Ansonia Police Department at 203-735-1885.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Synchronized effort rescues collection

first_imgHeavy rain Saturday night (March 8) caused a large drainpipe to rupture in Pusey Library. More than 500 gallons of water poured into the Harvard Theatre Collection stacks and seeped through the floor, flooding the three levels beneath it. At risk were hundreds of original drawings of costume and set designs, hand-painted theatrical backdrops, and Early American manuscripts and books, including the Emily Dickinson family library from Houghton Library, the University’s rare book depository.Damage to materials was less extensive than it might have otherwise been. With a flood watch set by the National Weather Service, the Harvard College Library (HCL) had arranged for security staff to conduct additional tours of the stacks over the weekend to monitor the libraries for water leaks. When the pipe burst at approximately 7:30 p.m., one of those guards discovered and reported it. Within 20 minutes of the report, HCL Operations was on site with the Library Collections Emergency Team (LCET) arriving shortly after.Like a well-rehearsed dance troupe, each team knew its part. Operations concentrated on stemming the flow of water from the pipe, vacuuming standing water from the affected floors of the library, and lowering humidity levels in the building. HCL Operations Director Paul Bellenoit and team member Andy LaPlume choreographed a custodial clean-up crew that was able to get to work quickly by drawing upon a well-stocked emergency supply closet containing wet vacs, dehumidifiers, folding tables, sheets of plastic, paper towels, and myriad other supplies anticipated for such emergencies. A moving crew was brought in after midnight to move the rain-soaked backdrops and prepare a staging area where they could be unrolled to dry.At the same time, the LCET team, assisted by Houghton librarians and staff members from the Office of the College Librarian, moved collections out of danger and began treating damaged materials. LCET is on call 24 hours a day to provide assistance in emergencies that threaten University library collections. It is comprised of conservators and preservation librarians in the Weissman Preservation Center and in the Preservation & Imaging unit of Harvard College Library. Project conservator Heather Hendry was the team leader Saturday and, together with Carie McGinnis, the Houghton preservation librarian, coordinated salvage and treatment efforts on site with four other LCET members.Finding space to lay out the extensive number of materials, many of them oversized, proved a particular challenge. After employing the full supply of emergency folding tables, LCET members moved out into the main level of Pusey Library, using the corridor floors and every possible tabletop in the reading rooms of the Theatre Collection, the Harvard Map Collection, and the University Archives; the floor of Houghton’s Edison and Newman Room; and a space under construction in Lamont Library.Level 1 of Pusey Library and all adjacent reading rooms were closed to the public until mid-week to allow materials in those spaces time to dry. The Harvard Map Collection, the University Archives, and the Pusey Library main entrance reopened on Wednesday, although some materials, which are cordoned off, are still drying on the corridor floor. The Harvard Theatre Collection, whose materials were most significantly affected, remains closed indefinitely. Materials from the collection that are available to patrons can be paged through the Houghton Reading Room.Rapid response in a water emergency is essential not only because of water damage to the collection and building, but also because of the serious potential for mold. At room temperature there is only a small window for drying and dehumidifying the environment before mold begins to grow. Once it sets in, every piece in the entire area must be disinfected and thoroughly vacuumed to remove mold spores. While water-damaged materials can be treated, mold often renders them impossible to salvage. This situation would have created a particularly difficult job because of the nature of the rare materials stored in that part of the library. The building infrastructure would have required the same time-intensive treatment. Fortunately, the library response teams beat the clock on all counts.— Harvard College Library Communicationslast_img read more

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Derrick Rose has bone spur that may require surgery

first_img Ashley Bastock Related TopicsCavaliersCavsClevelandCleveland CavaliersDerrick RoseDerrick Rose InjuryNBA Ashley is a former basketball player who covers the Cleveland Cavaliers, Indians and high school sports for NEO Sports Insiders. She also covers the Cavs for SB Nation’s Fear The Sword. Ashley is a 2015 graduate of John Carroll University and previously worked in political journalism. You can follow her on Twitter @AshleyBastock42center_img INDIANAPOLIS– Derrick Rose broke his media silence on Friday and said he has a bone spur in his left ankle that may require surgery.“It’s all about first getting the area to calm down and then strengthening your leg back up again,” Rose said Friday after Cavaliers’ shootaround. “So, afterwards, we may have to have a procedure but who knows.”Rose has played in just seven games this season after spraining his ankle during the second game of the year on Oct. 20 against the Milwaukee Bucks.Mentally, this latest injury began to take a toll on Rose, who has had three knee surgeries in the past. The day before Thanksgiving, Rose left the team. He rejoined the organization on Monday. Despite his return to rehab, there is no timetable for his return to the court. Rose also would not specify where he went during his time away.“I was just figuring things out,” Rose said. “Thinking about this and that. But I’m here for my team. I’m here to win. And that’s one of the reasons why I came back.”But when Rose returns, especially if Isaiah Thomas is integrated into the lineup before him, it’s unclear what his role on the team will be. Things get even more complicated when you consider the success that Dwyane Wade has had in running the second unit.In seven games this season, Rose is averaging 14.3 points per game and 1.7 assists. Rose said he was not going to stress about his role now, and confirmed he did not ask for a trade.“No, no, no, no, no, no. Trade? No. Come on, man,” Rose said. “I’m on one of the best teams in the league, why would I ask to get traded? They gave me every opportunity and still are going to give me every opportunity that I would want from any other team too, and that’s just to hoop. I just want to hoop.”Rose also said his deal with Adidas, which would not be guaranteed if he retired and is reportedly worth $80 million, did not play a role in his decision.“Not to be rude, I don’t care about no f—ing money,” Rose said. “It’s not about that. I’ve saved up enough money, it’s not about that. If I wanted to leave, I would have left. Like I said, coming back here, starting with rehab that’s my first step. Keeping it simple and just giving my team support, and then we’ll see what I see off the court.”As stated by head coach Tyronn Lue on Wednesday, Rose also confirmed that he addressed the team to apologize “for my actions,” and also thanked his coaches, teammates and the organization for their empathy during his time away.“He understood,” Rose said of general manager Koby Altman. “It’s hard, especially in my career, it was just hard getting guys to understand me, especially in a front office position. He just understood me, listened to me and was just trying to figure things out.”In the meantime, the Cavs continue on their historic 13-game win streak tonight in Indiana against the Pacers. If they pick up win No. 14 tonight, it will be a franchise record.But even in his absence, Rose said the win streak was one of the things that kept him focused.“That was the only thing that was keeping my mind clear. That we were winning, playing good basketball, and we got back on track.”last_img read more

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