Funding to support community engagement approach to study opioid prescribing

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Vermont Business Magazine An innovative initiative that will use a public health approach to inform opioid prescribing policies will be launched in northern New England thanks to a new $339,000 grant to the Northern New England Clinical and Translational Research (NNE-CTR) Network from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The program, titled “Hospital Utilization for Opioid Overdose: A Community-Engaged Multidisciplinary Approach to Measure the Impact of Policy Change and Inform Interventions,” will help address a critical health crisis in the region and nation.Launched in 2017, the NNE-CTR has a mission to develop and sustain a clinical and translational research infrastructure that supports improvement in rural and community health for inhabitants in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. The Northeast has the largest percentage of residents over 65 years of age. Consequently, the NNE-CTR supports a broad spectrum of clinical and translational studies that emphasize health problems endemic in the rural populations of northern New England.  Cancer, cardiovascular disease, substance abuse, and barriers that compromise rural health care delivery are priorities.Recently passed opioid-prescribing and prescription drug monitoring legislation in both Maine and Vermont aims to reduce access to prescription opioids and make it more difficult for patients to obtain prescriptions from multiple providers. University of Vermont investigators Valerie Harder, Ph.D., M.H.S., and Timothy Plante, M.D., M.H.S., and Maine investigator Kathleen Fairfield, M.D., Dr.PH, will analyze whether that legislation has successfully led to a decrease in opioid-related overdoses, hospitalizations and other medical events. The team will also look for evidence of unintended consequences, such as patients with substance use disorders using heroin, and will analyze the demographic trends of patient outcomes.“A decisive strength of the program is our collaboration with colleagues at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute,” says Gary Stein, Ph.D., principal investigator of the NNE-CTR and director of the University of Vermont Cancer Center. “This new initiative launched on September 1. The complementary institutional expertise will have impact locally, regionally and beyond.”“There is confidence the program will provide options and opportunities for development of a blueprint to address opioid overdose, with the potential to have a powerful influence on addressing addiction in northern New England,” says Clifford Rosen, M.D., principal investigator of the NNE-CTR and director of the Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Maine Medical Center Research Institute. “The grant leverages the research infrastructure of the NNE-CTR and will reinforce the reach of the NNE-CTR in a high priority medical challenge for our region and beyond.”The NNE-CTR Network is comprised of six program areas, each co-led by a faculty member from the University of Vermont and Maine Medical Center, including: Rural Health Research & Delivery; Translational Research Technologies; Clinical Research Design, Epidemiology & Biostatistics; Pilot Projects Program; and Professional Development, with the Tracking & Evaluation program led by faculty from the University of Southern Maine.Research conducted as part of this grant is supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number U54GM115516.  The content is solely the responsibility of the grantee institutions and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.Source: UVM 9.19.2018last_img read more

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The Four Rs — Survive to Thrive

first_imgI think I can confidently say that we’re tired of hearing about “Unprecedented Times” and “The New Normal.”The truth is that things are always in flux, and there are always businesses that are making money hand over fist while others are struggling to get by. Sure, a global pandemic and economic meltdown has caused more to suffer than in a normal business cycle, but even right now, some companies are having historic years in 2020.If you’re in a company that has been fortunate enough to be doing well, I give you my permission to stop reading now and go count your cash. You’ve earned it!However, if you’ve felt the pandemic pinch over the last four months, then this blog’s for you. If you’re wondering how to go from surviving to thriving as the light becomes visible at the end of the tunnel, I give you the four Rs.Retract, regroup, reinvest and reinvent.RetractIf you’ve made it this far, odds are you’ve tightened your business’s belt, which was smart. You may have paused purchases of new equipment, reduced marketing or advertising outlays, or even furloughed some employees. It was a hard decision that you most likely deliberated long and hard about, but it freed up the cash needed to buckle down for a few months, so it was necessary and justified. Retraction is instinctive, heck, even turtles pull their heads into their shells when under attack, but while in a retracted state, it’s important not to freeze up altogether. After you retract, it’s imperative that you move on to step 2.RegroupResist the tendency to lock up and wait out the storm. The best time to tackle that new initiative or revenue stream you were contemplating may be when things are slow. Many times, when our businesses are moving fast and furious, it’s nearly impossible to get out of “production” mode long enough to shift or innovate. Take a hard, honest look at your business. If you’re struggling, ask yourself what may have helped you be more durable — diversification, service revenues, better margins, cash flow, etc. Then ask yourself: If I were to start this business from scratch today, what would it look like? Create a new vision for the ideal model and then compare it to the structure and assets already in place to determine how you build a bridge from the old to the new.See related  Strong Showing From Interactive Displays Market, as Futuresource Announces Q3 ResultsReinvestOnce you have regrouped and created your map, use that as a guide to reinvest once revenues start flowing again. The natural reaction is to get “back to normal” and just recreate what you had before in the quickest way possible to restore revenues. This may be a huge mistake. The old model is what landed you in retraction mode when the wheels fell off. Take the 6 million dollar man strategy, don’t just sew the old parts and pieces back on and hope the new reassembled version can still perform like before.We can rebuild it We have the technology We have the capability to make the worlds first bionic company Our company will be just that Better than it was before Better, Stronger, FasterReinventNow that you’ve reemerged like a butterfly bursting forth from a chrysalis, it’s time to reinvent your company. Part of that reinvention is living out the mission you’ve newly invested in. Another key part of that is marketing yourselves properly and establishing your new identity.Some of the best stories are those of people who survived hardship, turned disadvantages into strengths and then assured a victory. Be vulnerable. Be transparent.Tell the story of how you were forced to retract but wouldn’t lie down. How you were determined to regroup and create a new vision. How you reinvested in that vision, exercising the discipline not to revert to the old model and how you’ve now emerged with a new perspective and value proposition that meets tomorrow’s challenges.last_img read more

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To Remember a Lecture Better, Take Notes by Hand

first_imgThe Atlantic: Psych 101 was about to start, and Pam Mueller had forgotten her laptop at home. This meant more than lost Facebook time. A psychology grad student at Princeton, Mueller was one of the class teaching assistants. It was important she have good notes on the lecture. Normally she used her laptop to take notes, but, without it, she’d have to rely on a more traditional approach.So she put pen to paper—and found something surprising.Class just seemed better. “I felt like I had gotten so much more out of the lecture that day,” she said. So she shared the story with Daniel Oppenheimer, the professor teaching the class.“‘I had a similar experience in a faculty meeting the other day,’” Mueller remembers him saying. “And we both sort of had that intuition that there might be something different about writing stuff down.”It turns out there is.A new study—conducted by Mueller and Oppenheimer—finds that people remember lectures better when they’ve taken handwritten notes, rather than typed ones.Read the whole story: The Atlantic More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Thursday Update: Hotshot Crews On Standby For Swan Lake Fire

first_imgMost of the new growth was to the northwest and northeast away from the Sterling highway and 5 ½ miles from the community of Sterling. Sarah Saarloos, with the Division of Forestry: “It continues to burn in that limited protection area of the refuge. The fire burned West into that 2017 East Fork Fire star, so there was movement to the northwest and northeast, similar to the pattern we saw yesterday. We didn’t see any movement South towards the highway so it’s still 2.7 miles North of the Sterling Highway.” Miller: “We did this to minimize the amount of folks that are back there, we had some sightseers going back there to get a closer look. We also want to make sure that any of the firefighters traveling back and forth have a safer route.” The Sterling Highway visibility warning is still in effect around Mile 68 and 75. Motorists are advised to slow down and use caution driving through the fire area due to heavy smoke. Steve Miller with the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: “We are still just monitoring the fire. What we do now have is a crew that if we do determine that we need to do some suppression activities we can, we have not actively suppressed this fire at all, but we have people setup. Right now it is moving in the best possible direction it can move. The crews are just in case it moves towards one of the existing fire breaks we can either burn off an existing fire break and stop it from heading in a certain direction. We just now have a crew in place to do that.”  FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享As fire managers continue to monitor the Swan Lake Fire, the Pioneer Peak Hotshots and Gannett Glacier Fire Crews are on standby and ready to assist with the 6,951 acre fire north of Sterling when necessary.Aerial photo taken 6/13/19The Fire was estimated at 6,951 acres after a reconnaissance flight Wednesday evening, nearly doubling in size since the previous estimate the night before. Fire managers with the Division of Forestry are working collaboratively with refuge personnel to manage the fire to reduce future wildland fire hazards and enhance wildlife habitat. The fire is located in an area where no values are threatened or where the likelihood of fire impact to values has been mitigated. The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge has closed the Mystery Creek Road, East Fork Moose River and Enstar Pipeline right-of-way which are north of the Sterling Highway along the eastern edge of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. The closure will remain in effect through July 11. Questions or requests for copies of the closure order or maps should be directed to the Refuge at (907) 262-7021. People with  recreational-related questions should contact the Refuge visitor center at (907) 260-2820.last_img read more

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Motorists dob in drink driver

first_imgA MAN was caught driving more than three times over the legal blood alcohol limit in Berwick on Saturday night….[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img

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