Obama’s Russia sanctions put Hill Republicans in a box

first_imgU.S. President Barack Obama’s eleventh-hour Russia sanctions present a big test for congressional Republicans, who are torn between decades-old party principles and their new standard-bearer’s unorthodox embrace of Russian President Vladimir Putin.Democrats are already seeking to exploit this rift, drafting legislation designed to make it harder for President-elect Donald Trump to unilaterally roll back Obama’s new sanctions.The goal is to force Republicans into a tough spot in which they can either soften their long-standing animosity toward Russia, opening themselves to charges of hypocrisy — or defy Trump, who on Wednesday dismissed efforts to punish Russia by saying “we ought to get on with our lives.” “It’s time for our country to move on to bigger and better things,” he said in a statement. “Nevertheless, in the interest of our country and its great people, I will meet with leaders of the intelligence community next week in order to be updated on the facts of this situation.”Following Obama’s rollout of the new sanctions, statements poured in from Democrats offering support, many saying they wanted more done to punish a country that U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded tried to tilt the presidential election in Trump’s favor.There were fewer statements from Republicans, who tempered their support for the new sanctions with criticisms of Obama’s overall approach to dealing with Russia.House Speaker Paul Ryan called the new sanctions “overdue,” but a spokesman declined to comment when asked whether the Wisconsin Republican would support legislation making it harder for Trump to roll them back.“While today’s action by the administration is overdue, it is an appropriate way to end eight years of failed policy with Russia,” Ryan said in a statement. “And it serves as a prime example of this administration’s ineffective foreign policy that has left America weaker in the eyes of the world.”Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) called the sanctions “a good initial step, however late in coming.” “Now is not the ‘time to get on with our lives,’” Sen. Ben Cardin, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said in a statement. “The executive branch has acted, but it is imperative the legislative branch now pick up the ball and move it forward. Congressional sanctions can complement and strengthen these new executive sanctions.”The Maryland senator vowed to introduce bills next month to create an independent commission to investigate Russian meddling in the election and hit the country with “comprehensive enhanced sanctions.” Other Democrats are also pushing legislation to codify the Obama-era sanctions.A Senate Democratic aide, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said it will be telling whether Republicans get on board with such measures. “It remains to be seen whether these guys are all talk and no action,” said the aide, who noted that “this is the Republican Party that in 2012 called Russia the No. 1 geopolitical foe for the United States in the world.”Democrats will likely have support in these efforts from two of the Senate’s leading Republican defense hawks, John McCain of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. They issued a joint statement Thursday saying they “intend to lead the effort in the new Congress to impose stronger sanctions on Russia.”McCain and Graham, though, have repeatedly defied Trump on the Russia issue, pushing for expanded investigations into Russia’s election interference. It remains to be seen where other Republicans will come down on the sanctions issue.After the sanctions announcement on Thursday, Trump said he would meet next week with intelligence officials for a briefing on Russian cyberattacks.center_img “As the next Congress reviews Russian actions against networks associated with the U.S. election,” McConnell said, “we must also work to ensure that any attack against the United States is met with an overwhelming response.”Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), meanwhile, said the sanctions are “too little, too late.”“These meager steps will not decisively change Putin’s calculation that his aggressions are worth the risk,” Sasse said. “We cannot afford to be in the same place a year from now — our adversaries must be deterred by knowing that cyber attacks will be met with swift and decisive responses.”Obama’s new sanctions are a follow-up to those his administration imposed in 2014 in response to Russia’s annexation of Crimea. Thursday’s sanctions target Russian security and intelligence assets, including booting 35 Russian intelligence operatives from the United States. Like the earlier sanctions, these were put in place through executive actions that Trump could potentially undo with the stroke of a pen.“I hope the incoming Trump administration, which has been far too close to Russia throughout the campaign and transition, won’t think for one second about weakening these new sanctions or our existing regime,” said incoming Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York. “We need to punch back against Russia, and punch back hard.” Also On POLITICO Russia to close American school, warns of further actions, in wake of US sanctions By Cristiano Lima White House sanctions Russia over election hacks By Eric Geller and Cory Bennettlast_img read more

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SFNF Fuelwood Permit Sales At Pueblo Of Jemez Welcome Center Saturdays Only In November

first_imgPermits are also available at all SFNF offices, including Forest Headquarters in Santa Fe. The nonrefundable fuelwood permits are for personal use only and may be purchased for $20 for five cords with a maximum of 15 cords per household per year. Customers may purchase permits by check, credit/debit card or cash through Dec. 31, 2019. Permit purchasers will receive load tags, a fuelwood cutting map and guidelines for harvesting the wood. Permits and other products may be purchased at the Jemez Ranger Station at 051 Woodsy Lane in Jemez Springs off N.M. 4, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. (Credit cards are accepted only until 4 p.m.) Customers may want to call the Jemez District Office at 575.289.3535 to check availability of the permits. “We know how important fuelwood is to many of our communities, and the ability to buy a permit on the weekend is a big plus for many of our customers,” District Ranger Brian Riley said. “That’s why we are making an effort to keep the Welcome Center staffed on Saturdays. We apologize for any inconvenience and hope to return to our normal hours by the first weekend in December.” SANTA FE ― Sales of Santa Fe National Forest (SFNF) fuelwood permits and other Forest Service products at the Pueblo of Jemez Welcome Center, also known as the Walatowa Visitor Center, will be limited to Saturdays only for the month of November.center_img Normally, the Pueblo of Jemez Welcome Center, located at 7413 N.M. 4 on Jemez Pueblo, has a Forest Service employee onsite Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays seasonally to sell permits and provide visitors with information about the forest. Due to a staffing issue, the SFNF is able to staff the Pueblo of Jemez Welcome Center on Saturdays only this month. SFNF News:last_img read more

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How Strava Is Using Data To Create A Community Of Athletes

first_imgTags:#data#fitness trackers#GPS#Guest Posts#social network#wearable devices#Wearable.ai courtney dickson Related Posts A Strava Live run. This post also appears on Wearable.ai, which interviews the innovators in wearable computing, IoT, and AR. For inquiries, please contact publisher Mark Brooks.We spoke to Mark Gainey, CEO and cofounder of Strava, a social network for athletes that makes use of GPS devices and other wearables to create what they call a “social fitness” experience. Strava uses  the vast amounts of data being collected by various connected devices to provide motivation, track stats, record maintenance, and status of gear and equipment, and encourage camaraderie among its members.In this interview, Gainey explained why he thinks wearables will continue to make fitness a more enjoyable and seamless part of our everyday lives.Courtney Dickson: How was Strava founded? What were your inspirations?Mark Gainey: Michael Horvath and I started Strava in 2009. We both rowed crew at Harvard in the late ’80s and thrived on the camaraderie and motivation of training with teammates. The idea for Strava came simply from our desire to recreate the positive forces of our crew experience when we no longer had the structure and support of a team. In its simplest form, Strava was a “virtual locker room” where we could share workouts among friends. We started Strava with a focus on cycling, and added running in 2011. Since its founding in 2009, Strava has grown from a handful of users to millions of athletes around the world. Our mission is simple—to motivate and inspire our members in ways that unlock their potential.CD: Strava is known for being more than just a way to log workouts. It’s a social fitness app that encourages users to connect with each other. As more and more people are buying and using wearable devices to track their fitness, what changes have you seen in how users are interacting in the Strava community?MG: Millions of cyclists and runners around the world not only track and analyze their training with Strava but also use it as their social channel to connect with other athletes and stay motivated. Almost 90% of all Strava athletes follow another athlete on Strava, and the average Strava member engages with Strava 5-7 times a day. According to our members, “If it’s not on Strava, it did not happen.”Strava is growing rapidly and is truly global. We add over 100,000 new members every week, and almost 80% of our athletes live outside the US. We have activities on all seven continents and in over 180 countries.We see our members interact with Strava in a number of different ways. We are now compatible with over 150 different GPS devices. So our athletes can track their activities in whatever way they find most convenient. And then they can seamlessly upload to Strava via our mobile apps and website.CD: What sets Strava above the competition?MG: Talk to most of our competitors, and you’ll find they refer to their audience as users, not members. Talk to a Strava athlete on the other hand, and they will tell you they may have “downloaded” other fitness apps, but then they “joined” Strava. We are for more than an app. We are a community.Strava designs products for passionate athletes. They love their sport, strive to improve, and want to connect with people who feel the same way. We feel that we’ve built the best home for this kind of athlete, and that’s what separates us from our competitors.Our athletes are fully engaged, online and offline. They support each other on Strava. We have an inspirational, passionate community that I believe is unmatched.CD: Beyond smartwatches and fitness trackers, what other connected devices are being used with the platform, or would you like to incorporate in the future?MG: We support data input from nearly 150 third-party devices, including everything from Garmin bike computers to Fitbit wearables and shirts with integrated sensors. We have built our own training apps for iOS, Android, Android Wear, and Apple Watch. This allows us to analyze everything from GPS data to physiology and nutrition data. As our athletes add more connected devices to their daily fitness lives, we are dedicated to helping them bring context and color to the information collected.CD: Where do you see the wearables market heading in the next 5 to 10 years, and how will Strava adapt to keep up?MG: We see the integration of fitness sensors becoming even more seamless—in clothing, in bicycle frames, in running shoes, et cetera. And we expect these wearable devices to provide more in-depth data and feedback. With our focus on our passionate athletes, we will continue to design technology that provides motivation and inspiration for our members. Strava is always innovating to serve the athletes. We seek to inspire and unlock potential. We’re a company full of athletes, so designing products that leverage our wealth of data and athlete insights to help athletes improve is at our core.Screenshot courtesy of Strava For interviews with the innovators in Wearable Computing, IoT, and AR, subscribe to the Wearable.ai newsletter. What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star…center_img Kickstarting a Stagnant Company How to Make the Most of Your Software Developer… WordPress for Enterprise – How This Open-…last_img read more

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Black SUV in muggings found say Police

first_img ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Related Items:#magneticmedianews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provo Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, March 10, 2017 – Providenciales – Police yesterday report that they have found that black SUV believed to be involved in both attacks on women exercising on Monday morning.  Investigators are still in search of the people behind the attempted robbery in Grace Bay, where the tourist woman got away and the attack of another woman on Leeward Highway near Napa, where she was dashed to the ground and her cell phone stolen.  Both happened within minutes of each other between 5:30am and 6am this past Monday.#MagneticMediaNews Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meeting Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for youlast_img read more

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Watch Google Unveils Working Prototype of Project Ara Its Modular Smartphone

first_imgOctober 31, 2014 Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Today, Google’s dream of a modular smartphone — an initiative dubbed Project Ara — has inched one step closer to reality.While technologically ambitious, a device in which different blocks can be affixed and detached — keyboards, cameras, batteries, speakers and storage, for instance — would allow for radical personalization in terms of both functionality and aesthetics.The Project Ara team released a video showcasing one of its first working prototypes, the Spiral 1. Though clunky, an improved version called the Spiral 2 will be unveiled at a developer conference in January.Related: Google Is Developing an Ingestible Cancer-Detecting PillIn the video, Ara Knaian, a tech lead for whom the project is named, explains that the Spiral 1 doesn’t leave a lot of space for developers, who will eventually be able to create various modules that attach to the phone’s frame. With the forthcoming Spiral 2, however, “most of the area should be available for the developers function” thanks to custom chips created by Toshiba, Knaian says.Knaian also describes the “magic moment” of finally receiving physical prototype parts after having envisioned the device for months, and recounts his delight when the gadget first passed its “smoke test” — so named, he explains, because “your primary thought at that point is, ‘Is this thing gonna start smoking?’”Watch the early prototype power up in the video below:Related: BlackBerry CEO: Don’t Be Tempted By Trendy, Popular Phones. Buy Ours Instead. 2 min readcenter_img Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Register Now »last_img read more

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