Charlottesville schools closed over ‘racially charged’ online threat

first_imgogolne/iStock(CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.) — Public schools in Charlottesville, Virginia are shutdown for the second day in a row over an online threat. The threat was “racially charged” though no further specific details about the threat have been shared by the Charlottesville School Board. An investigation involving state and federal authorities is ongoing, according to the Charlottesville City Schools superintendent Rosa Atkins. “We do not tolerate hate or racism. The entire staff and School Board stand in solidarity with our students of color — and with people who have been singled out for reasons such as religion or ethnicity or sexual identity in other vile threats made across the country or around the world. We are in this together, and a threat against one is a threat against all,” the school board said in a statement.This is not the city’s first brush with race-based issues. Charlottesville was the site of the deadly Unite the Right rally in 2017 where groups of white supremacists and counter protesters clashed on the streets.The Charlottesville City Schools include seven elementary schools, one middle school, one high school and one education program for young patients at the University of Virginia Children’s Hospital. The school board gave parents some tips about how they should broach the shutdown with their children. “For instance, for young students, you might say, ‘Someone said they wanted to hurt some students, and the people who run the schools decided that it would be safer for for students to stay home,’” the school board posted on its website.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Read More »

Why a “kink collective” is getting pushed out of Bed-Stuy

first_img(Credit: iStock)A kink collective plans to move out of Bedford-Stuyvesant following weeks of outcry spearheaded by one of the businesses’ neighbors.Charlotte Taillor moved her business into Bed-Stuy from a more expensive location in Crown Heights, and her neighbor Laurie Miller started to notice men coming and going from the house in January, according to the New York Times. Miller soon put up fliers asking to meet with the block association and urging locals to call the police and community board about what she called “a gentlemen’s sex club” with “no business” being in the neighborhood.Taillor started her business in 2016 as a community center to help educate people, specifically women, about B.D.S.M. Although she has given into pressure from the neighborhood and plans to move the business, Taillor still defended her business and stressed in particular that it was not a sex club.“Nobody is allowed to have sex on the premises,” she told the Times. “Even me.”Taillor is raising money for moving costs and a new space, but will not be able to move until April. Miller, who has lived in the neighborhood since 1974, told the Times that she still felt unsafe with The Taillor Group next door.“Not until she’s out,” Miller said. “That’s when I’ll breathe a sigh of relief.” [NYT] – Eddie Small This content is for subscribers only.Subscribe Nowlast_img read more

Read More »