Euro 2016 Talk: Icelandic commentator loses mind, Brady’s on fire

first_imgJeff Hendrick takes on the Ronaldo role.LOUD NOISES!Germany’s Brexit promise.Zlat’s it folks!Ronaldo: I hate Iceland!Frettabladid front page Press ReaderIrish Independent front page Press ReaderJornal de Noticias front page Press ReaderGazzetta dello Sport front page Press ReaderHet Nieuwsblad front page Press Reader Peter Martin on James McFadden’s goal has nothing on this.They love each other really.More Irish injustice.Does this count as wasting the time of emergency services? What will be the real legacy of Euro 2016? A new sense of continental unity? Improved security for supporters? No, it’ll probably be calls made to emergency services reporting players being on fire.The Northern Irish fire brigade must have taken countless calls of Will Grigg being on fire over the past few weeks, but last time it was their Republic of Ireland counterparts’ turn to take the calls. This time Robbie Brady was on fire.Elsewhere, one Icelandic commentator sounded like he was on fire as he celebrated his country’s dramatic winner against Austria. And Germany has made a Brexit promise to England. It’s all in today’s Euro 2016 Talk.last_img read more

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R135m for ‘second chance’ at matric

first_imgNational call centre The “Second Chance Project” will give learners who failed three subjects or less an opportunity to gain remedial learning through class room-based tuition. “In addition to assisting learners to pass the subjects they have failed, the project will incorporate a skills development, language improvement and study skills programme in order to prepare participants for the world of work, or higher education for those who aspire to enrol at universities or colleges.” Lungisa said the first part of the project would target 30 000 learners, who would attend classes at 58 sites that had been set up across the country. Fifty percent of these learners would come from rural areas. The agency, through funding from the private sector, will foot the bill for tuition fees. The initiative, a partnership between the NYDA, the Department of Education and the Matthew Goniwe School of Leadership and Governance, will be implemented in conjunction with the national and provincial education departments. “The project will help these learners achieve the National Senior Certificate in order to prepare them for admission to institutions of higher learning and also avoid adding to the number of unemployed young people,” Lungisa said. Launching the project in Johannesburg this week, NYDA chairperson Andile Lungisa said the class of 2008 would be used as a pilot, with the programme expected to be rolled out every year. South Africa’s National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) has set aside R135-million to give learners who failed matric in 2008 a second chance at a better future. Professional teachers He said the agency and its partners had already identified professional teachers to be used for the programme. The department estimates that as many as 200 000 learners failed their matric in 2008, while thousands more dropped out of Grade 10 and Grade 11. Most of these youngsters are left unemployable due the fact that they are unskilled. 20 October 2009 Lungisa said a national call centre would also be set up to help learners with the options available to them should they fail their Grade 12. Remedial learning, tuition The NYDA, the result of a merger between the National Youth Commission and the Umsobomvu Youth Fund, and was officially inaugurated in June. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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SKA ‘driving human capital development’

first_img9 July 2012 A number of benefits are already materialising from South Africa’s selection as the major location for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, Science and Technology Deputy Director-General Thomas Auf der Heyde said in Pretoria on Sunday. “These spin-offs are in the area of human capital development,” Auf der Heyde said at an astronomy summit hosted at the University of Pretoria. “There have been new bursaries, a number of them, that have been introduced into the system [towards the study of astronomy],” he said. “The SKA team can show how international students are taking up these bursaries, coming to work in South Africa. These are huge human capital developments that accrued from our investments in astronomy.” Auf der Heyde said that South Africa’s selection had also raised awareness of science among the country’s population. “It’s unbelievable how many people have understood the principle of what the SKA competition was all about. They understood that it was really important and it had to do with astronomy, science and technology,” he said. “I have been told about the enormous interest from schools who want to understand more about astronomy. Facilities like the Sci-Bono centre in Johannesburg are finding a huge upsurge in the interest in science.” In May, SKA board chairman John Womersley announced at a press conference at Schiphol Airport, Amsterdam that South Africa would share the SKA project with Australia. Auf der Heyde said the major hurdle to South Africa’s technological advancement was the lack of skilled workers. “It is obvious to me that the key bottleneck in the more effective use of the infrastructure is not that we don’t have enough scientists, we don’t have enough artisans, engineers and technicians to enable [us] to adapt the instruments from time to time. “Now, with 2 500 radio telescopes to be build from 2016 until 2034, we have got a need for vocational artisan training in the country that is unprecedented. We have a strong rationale to ensure that the human capital development takes place.” Auf der Heyde said the SKA project in South Africa had received much support from structures like the African Union Commission, the European Union and BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa). “I can tell you that strategically and politically, this is a very significant achievement. The South African political machinery has understood the political importance of this,” he said. Sapalast_img read more

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