Major season not a good one for GOLF

first_imgAs a golf fan, you might not care one bit if the professional game grows beyond its already sizable circle. That’s cool. And if you’re one of those golf fans who is happy to simply enjoy the professional game, then 2016 was a magical major champion season. We had great winners. We had drama. We had a duel for the ages. It has been great for golf. But — and here’s where we probably differ — I don’t think it’s been as great for GOLF, all capital letters. What’s the difference between golf and GOLF? I guess I’d put it this way: It’s the difference between the Stanley Cup and the NHL regular season. It’s the difference between the Kentucky Derby and every other horse race. It’s the difference between the Indy 500 and other open-wheel races. Golf is a great sport. GOLF is a cultural phenomenon. Yes, there are a few times in the game’s history when GOLF transcends its usual place in the American landscape and becomes something bigger. This happened for a time in the 1950s after Ben Hogan survived a horrible car crash and then came back to win the U.S. Open (and, a short while later, three majors in one year). They made a movie about that, threw a ticker tape parade for him, all that stuff. GOLF became cool in the 1960s because Arnold Palmer was cool, the way he smoked his cigarettes and lashed at the ball and charged from behind at the finish. GOLF was titanic when Jack Nicklaus dueled with Palmer and Lee Trevino and Tom Watson. And, of course, Tiger Woods took GOLF to unprecedented heights, unheard of ratings, impossibly high purses and all that. Tiger’s chase of “greatest player ever” masked his overwhelming accomplishment of becoming the most famous player ever. He made golf as important to sports fans as just about any other sport. It seemed to me going into this major championship season that there was a chance for golf to once again skyrocket into America’s imagination. And, as great as 2016 was, I don’t think that happened. Don’t misunderstand: It was fantastic for golf fans. At the Masters, we watched Jordan Spieth’s first encounter with doubt and uncertainty. He collapsed down the stretch, and a fine English player, Danny Willett, played brilliantly and took the green jacket. At the U.S. Open, we watched Dustin Johnson — a massive and star-crossed talent who can do things that no other player can — finally put it together and win even as the USGA clumsily mishandled a penalty ruling. Photo gallery: Best moments from the 2016 major season At The Open, we had perhaps the greatest duel in golf history — certainly right there with the Watson-Nicklaus Duel in the Sun at Turnberry in 1977 — as the superb Henrik Stenson somehow out-birdied Phil Mickelson while they both left the rest of the world far behind. And finally, at a weather-flattened PGA Championship, a game Texan with the plain name of Jimmy Walker held off the world’s No. 1 player, Jason Day, to win his first major championship. All four of the champions, in fact, were excellent pros and first-time major winners. But GOLF, the grand version of the game, is driven by superstars. And some of us came into this year with the hope, even the expectation, of having more than one superstar drive the sport on to the front pages and magazine covers and lead stories on TV. As the year began, the top three players in the world were: 1. Spieth: Magical putter; winner of two major championships and the FedEx Cup in 2015; likable Texan, who doesn’t only play well, he serves as he own analyst on the course. 2. Day: Friendly Australian; record setter for lowest major championship score at the PGA Championship; inspiring story who overcame various troubles and built a near-flawless game. 3. Rory McIlroy: Powerful Irishman; perfect swing; probably has the highest ceiling of any player in the world — at his best, he might be unbeatable. You couldn’t get three more perfect candidates to have a shootout for golf’s top billing. They are friendly with each other, but there’s an obvious rivalry between them. They have very different styles and games. They all have charisma. No one player can ever be Tiger, but together the three have a chance to give us a tension and sense of surprise that The Woods Era could not provide. This was a chance for something great. And that just didn’t materialize. Spieth, after his meltdown at Augusta, wasn’t a factor in any of the other majors. Day certainly has had a good year — winning The Players Championship and WGC-Match Play and finishing second at the PGA — but he returned to his close-but-not-quite ways in the majors. And McIlroy was all over the place, finishing top 10 at two majors (though not really in contention for either) and missing the cut in the other two. So that just didn’t come together. Of course, golf fans will tell you, that’s no surprise. Golf is a game of disappointment. Day had an amazing year, even if he didn’t win any majors. Spieth won twice this year and led for all but the last nine holes at the Masters. McIlroy won in Dubai. It’s not fair to expect those guys to just compete at every major championship. And it isn’t fair. But this is how Woods spoiled us and lifted GOLF to such great heights. He brought his game week after week after week. He didn’t miss major championship cuts (or, really, any cuts). He didn’t blow leads in the fourth round. He didn’t miss the putts that win and lose championships. There was never even the slightest doubt who the No. 1 player in the world was, and this made golf fascinating to people like my mother who would not even know which end of the golf club with which to hit. He gave order to the game — you could root for him or against him and it was just as fun. Now, who is No. 1 in the world? The rankings say it’s Day. He’s had the best year, but without a major championship the year is incomplete. Johnson moved up to No. 2 in the world, and he certainly could become that big star that draws people to golf — he’s a thrilling player, there’s the Gretzky connection, etc. — but he has proven to be unreliable for various reasons, and he just had a stink bomb of a PGA Championship. Spieth? McIlroy? Rickie Fowler? The ageless Mickelson? Tiger himself? How about Beef? There’s a lot of excitement in all that, and if you’re a golf fan, these are good times. But if you’re not a golf fan, I suspect 2016 didn’t change your mind. And that’s the lost chance.last_img read more

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Dianggap Lumrah, Burung Elang Masuk di Kabin Pesawat Maskapai Timur Tengah

first_img(Fox News) Membawa hewan untuk dukungan emosional sah-sah saja bila memang dibutuhkan dan memiliki keterangan yang jelas dalam sebuah penerbangan. Namun bagaimana jadinya jika hewan dukungan emosional tersebut merupakan burung elang yang kerap kali dikatakan sebagai burung pemangsa atau predator?Baca juga: Burung Merak, Ikon Pendukung Emosi Ini Dilarang Masuk dalam PenerbanganKabarPenumpang.com melansir dari laman foxnews.com (1/4/2019), di sebuah penerbangan dua orang pria membawa tiga ekor burung elang bersama mereka. Kedua pria itu membawa burung elang sembari berjalan menyusuri lorong kabin untuk mencari kursi mereka. Ini membuat mata penumpang lain tertuju kepada mereka berdua dan memandang hal itu dengan bingung. Pria pertama membawa satu burung elang ditangannya dan pria lainnya membawa dua ekor elang.Seorang pnumpang bernama Donnie mentweet dengan caption, “Orang-orang mulai berpindah dari tempat duduk untuk menjauh dari mereka. Saya hanya mengajukan diri untuk duduk dekat dengan mereka. Mereka membuat saya aman.”“Post Flight Thoughts: Akan naik dengan seluruh pesawat penuh elang jika diberi kesempatan. Saya melihat seorang anak berusia enam tahun mencoba menyentuh seekor elang, tetapi tidak melihat elang-elang itu mencoba menyentuh anak-anak berusia enam tahun. Berperilaku sangat baik,” ujarnya lagi dalam ciutan di akun Twitter @DonnieDoesWorld.Video kedua pria membawa tiga ekor elang tersebut diunggah bersamaan dengan tulisan itu pada 29 Maret 2019 kemarin. Video ini sudah dilihat lebih dari 1,95 juta dan 37 ribu suka dari warganet yang melihatnya. Meski sebagai hewan dukungan emosional, ternyata ada hal yang menarik yakni, burung elang yang bepergian dengan pesawat adalah hal yang lumrah dalam penerbangan maskapai dari negara-negara Teluk seperti Etihad dan Qatar Airways.Di Qatar sendiri mengoleksi burung elang dianggap sebuah hobi nasional. Pasalnya Unesco bahkan menetapkan elang ke dalam daftar warisan Budaya Takbenda warisan manusia untuk budaya Timur Tengah. Maskapai Qatar Airways sendiri memungkinkan penumpang ekonomi untuk membawa seekor elang didalam kabin.Tetapi batas maksimal adalah enam ekor elang yang diizinkan dibawa dalam kabin ekonomi untuk satu pesawat dalam sekali penerbangan. Membawa elang sendiri termasuk dalam hitungan bagasi dengan kelebihan biaya bagasi sebesar antara $115 hingga $630 untuk hak istimewa tersebut.Di Etihad, penumpang ekonomi dapat membawa satu elang ketika mereka membayar tiga kali lipat dari kelebihan tarif bagasi normal. Punya lebih dari satu? Anda dapat mengambil elang ekstra saat membeli kursi tambahan atau penumpang kelas bisnis dapat mengambil dua (sekali lagi membayar tiga kali lipat tarif bagasi per burung).Baca juga: Bebek Ini Bantu Atasi Stress Pasca TraumaPada tahun 2017, seorang “pangeran Saudi” menjadi berita utama setelah sebuah foto diunggah ke Reddit yang memperlihatkan sebuah kabin pesawat yang penuh dengan burung mangsa berkerudung. Itu diposting dengan caption, “Teman kapten saya mengirimi saya foto ini. Pangeran Saudi membeli tiket seharga 80 elang. ”Tidak jelas maskapai mana yang ditawari elang.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading… Relatedlast_img read more

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Why NFL trades are so rare

first_imgThe NFL trade deadline, which in 2019 is Tuesday, Oct. 29 at 4 p.m. ET, would seem to be a perfect opportunity for teams to acquire draft picks. But there are certain reasons why the NFL finds it difficult to trade players.MORE: 2019 NFL trade deadline info, rumorsThe standard NFL contract in general is not conducive to trading in the salary cap world of football. Most teams follow a standard protocol when it comes to negotiating a contract structure. A player often receives a signing bonus when he agrees to a contract. The signing bonus is a large payment, often a percentage of the total contract value. For accounting purposes, the maximum amount that counts on the cap in a given season is one-fifth of the bonus, so it allows teams to prorate the costs and lessen the salary cap impact of a contract. These bonuses can be as large as $30 million for a superstar quarterback and around $10 million for a decent starter at other positions.In terms of salary cap impact, a trade is essentially the same as releasing a player. If a player is traded at the deadline, all future prorated money will accelerate into the next season. For some teams, that takes certain players off the table if their signing bonuses and other prorated bonuses are large. In general, if a player’s dead money charge in a given year will prevent him from being released the following year, it will also prevent him from being traded during the given season.The signing bonus also presents a major psychological barrier to trading. The “sunk cost trap” is something we all fall into in our daily lives. If you feel you already paid a large amount of money for something that no longer does the job you expected, you still try to fix it and make it work because you paid so much. Imagine paying somebody $20 million in a given year for a five-year contract and by the next year sending the balance of that contract to another team. In essence, you are handing that team $16 million of your money in return for a third-round pick. A general manager looks bad in that scenario.The team trading for a player also needs cap room to execute a trade. For example, in 2016, many thought the Vikings needed to trade for an offensive lineman despite their having a little more than $1 million in cap space. In order for the NFL to allow a trade for a player like a Joe Thomas, who would have cost around $4.5 million for the remainder of the season, the Vikings would have had to to create an additional $3.5 million in space. That would have required restructuring other contracts, which might have compromised the Vikings in the future.MORE: The NFL’s 25 highest-paid playersThere is also difficulty in negotiating compensation in a trade. Rarely are trades in the NFL going to be player-for-player like they are in other sports. The compensation is almost always going to involve future draft selections, and negotiating that can be difficult, especially if the player who’s being traded will be a free agent the following year.The NFL awards 32 extra draft picks (compensatory picks) each year starting at the end of the third round. In order to qualify for a pick, a team must lose more free agents than it signs, and the round in which it is awarded a draft pick is based primarily on the salary the player receives in free agency. So if a team has a player who is expected to earn a high salary, there is no need to trade him unless the team can receive at least a third-round pick. Every year as the NFL trade deadline nears, we speculate about player trades. And, most of the time, the trade deadline comes and goes with little action.To many, it seems odd that the NFL has not embraced trades the way other leagues have. Bad teams in other sports become sellers, and the trade deadline presents an option for teams to get out of bad contracts or receive something in return for players who may not be in their future plans. The final reasons trades are difficult in the NFL are spending requirements. The NFL and NFLPA have negotiated spending minimums each team must meet over a four-year period. For teams that are tight when it comes to reaching those thresholds, it becomes necessary to keep certain players at the trade deadline.There are ways around some of these problems, and we are seeing teams address that in their contracts and decisions. Teams like the Raiders and Buccaneers have stopped using signing bonuses in their free-agent contracts. Teams like the Cardinals have prepaid salaries to help with cap and/or cash situations. More teams negotiate compensation based on a player re-signing with the team to which he is traded.So in the future, expect to see more trades, but it will be a slow process that evolves over the next few years.last_img read more

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CULINARY STUDENTS AT LYIT HAVE CHRISTMAS WRAPPED UP!

first_imgA group of first year culinary arts students at LYIT put their chefs uniform shoe boxes to good use with the Team Hope Christmas Shoebox Appeal.The Shoe Box appeal is an annual event, which ensures children living in extreme poverty are given presents at Christmas. The students filled shoe boxes with gifts which will be delivered to children living in Eastern Europe and Africa. For many of these children these are the only presents they will receive.Pictured is Ms Liz McKenzie, Programme Tutor with all the students giving the boxes to Ms Vanessa Purdy, Team Hope Donegal. Included in the photograph are Mairead O’Kane and Roisin McCormack of Students Support Services LYIT, Tanya Russell, LYIT Student Union Welfare Officer, Mr Tim Dewhirst, Programme Tutor an Mr Ciarán Ó hAnnracháin, Head of Department of Hospitality, Tourism and Culinary Arts.    CULINARY STUDENTS AT LYIT HAVE CHRISTMAS WRAPPED UP! was last modified: December 3rd, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:culinary studentsLYIT< showbox appeallast_img read more

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#Nextchat: Creating Powerful Cultures

first_imgSo they built their culture around that, particularly in the way they make decisions. Although they have a fairly traditional, hierarchical structure (on paper anyway), the actual practice of decision-making is really very fluid, morphing and flexing depending on who has access to that critical information about the patients’ hopes, dreams, and aspirations. If a particular patient was very passionate about sailing before their injury, there is nothing holding back one of the healthcare providers from spending money to get that patient out on a lake to do their rehabilitation work. According to one employee, “There are no lines we can’t cross in terms of creativity and what we can do for our residents.”  How you run meetings internally, how you share information across departments, and how you do the basics of project management—these can all be low hanging fruit that you can address in order start clarifying and reinforcing a culture that drives your success. People need to see the changes happening in real ways for the new culture to take root. If you missed this chat you can read the RECAP with all the tweets here.  What a powerful culture looks likePowerful cultures have a clear understanding of what drives success. In the case of QLI, they have figured this out in a very tangible way. It’s a granular and focused understanding of what “makes or breaks” them. QLI provides rehabilitation to people with brain and spinal cord injuries. Their work is not just about providing adequate healthcare — it’s about rebuilding shattered lives.  by Maddie Grant In order to be successful, they have to connect their healthcare services very deeply to the patient’s life, accessing the patient’s hopes, dreams, and aspirations in the process. It’s the only way to get the rehabilitation to really stick. That deeper, meaningful connection is what drives their success. What’s a Twitter Chat? Three Tools for Twitter Chats Changing your organization’s cultureOnce you get clear on what drives your organization’s success, you’ll actually have to start changing how you do things internally so you can align your culture with the success factors and to make sure the processes you design end up rewarding people who behave in the ways that generate the most success. When you start to work on your culture, don’t settle for a positive-sounding list of core values that will look good as posters on the wall. If your core values are “customer focus”, “excellence and quality”, “innovation”, “collaboration” – I would argue that they are meaningless. Why? Because everyone else has those same core values. Instead, make a clear case that those posters you have about collaboration or respect actually connect deeply to what drives your success. Actually start building those ideas into your processes, both at the surface level and within your HR processes. Please join @shrmnextchat at 3 p.m. ET on January 18 for #Nextchat with special guest, Founding Partner of WorkXO, Maddie Grant (@maddiegrant). We’ll chat about what it takes to create a powerful culture in your organization. From there, organizations doing this kind of thinking about culture almost always start to focus on deeper changes related to human resources—hiring, onboarding, firing, and performance management. Look at the famous culture “cool kid” in the business world, Zappos. They have infused their success factors into their hiring processes to ensure a culture of “WOW” customer service.  When the connection is clear, the employees will see it and behave accordingly, because deep down everyone wants to be successful. You’ll get that employee engagement you’ve been looking for while shoring up the bottom line in the process. Now THAT is a best place to work.  Q1. What are the outward signs of a powerful company culture?Q2. What leadership behaviors drive positive and powerful cultures within organizations? Q3. Organizations should design their culture around what drives their success. True or false? — and why?Q4. What are the keys to creating vision and mission statements that will help ensure a powerful workplace culture?Q5. How should employees be involved, and how can they be empowered, to create more powerful workplace cultures?Q6. What is HR’s role in creating powerful workplace cultures? Q7. As an HR professional, what inhibits your ability to create a more powerful culture in your workplace?Q8. What is your advice for senior leaders at organizations with broken cultures for creating more powerful cultures?  So while a lot of organizations may spend time trying to find the right balance of happy hours or break-room perks to try to bolster their culture and employee engagement scores, the companies that have the truly strong cultures—that run circles around their competition—actually take a different approach. They directly connect their culture to what drives their success and design their culture around that.  How do you help your staff connect culture to what drives the success of the enterprise? Quality Living, Inc. (QLI) is a healthcare company in Omaha, Nebraska that has come in first in their local “best place to work” award so many times, they’ve been effectively taken out of the competition and put in their own category in order to give some other deserving companies a shot at the top spot of recognition. How do they do it? Not through happy hours or foosball in the break rooms. They do it by being crystal clear on what drives the success of their enterprise. Company culture is not about being cool or even being a “best place to work.” It’s about being more successful. Period.last_img read more

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Cloud Computing Brings Permanent Cost Reductions in IT Infrastructure

first_imgEconomies of scale: The service provider becomes an expert in the field and can deliver the service more efficiently at lower administrative costs than any other provider, possibly at a lower price than the cost of implementing the same service in house.  (OpEx)The infrastructure is shared across multiple tenants. (CapEx)Application software licensing costs are shared across tenants.(OpEx) The IT organization can defer server purchases and decommision data centers as in house capabilities are phased out in favor of cloud services (CapEx) A third alternative comes from technology refreshes as shown below. Expensive and slow capital procurement processes are no longer necessary. (CapEx) The environment is virtualized allowing dynamic consolidation.  Servers are run at the most efficient utilization sweet spot, and hence fewer servers overall are required to deliver a given capability. (CapEx) The introduction of a new technology, lowers the cost of doing business, seen as a cost dip. Costs can be managed through aggressive “treadmill” of technology adoption, but this does not fix the general uptrend, and not many organizations are willing or even capable of sustaining this technology innovation schedule.Finally, the adoption of cloud computing will likely lead to a structural and sustainable cost reduction for the foreseeable future due to the synergies of reuse. As in the outsourcing case, there is an initial bump in cost due to the upfront investment needed and while the organization readjusts and goes through the learning curve.Cloud computing reduces both capital and operational expenses through multiple factors: The traditional IT infrastructure is highly siloed.  Once these silos are broken, there is no need to overprovision to meet peak workloads. (CapEx) Virtualization and cloud computing bring costs down by enabling the reuse and sharing of physical and application resources  leads to a more efficient and higher degree of utilization for that particular resource.Most IT organizations today are under enormous pressure to keep their budgets in check. Their costs are going up, but their budgets are flat to decreasing as illustrated in the figure below.  This is more true than ever in this period of economic and financial crisis. The situation is not sustainable and eventually leads to unpleasant conditions such as slower technology refresh cycles, reduced expectations for IT value delivered and layoffs. The service re-use inherent in cloud computing promises long lasting relief from the cost treadmill.Conceptually, a portion of IT budgets is used to maintain existing projects.  It’s the portion dedicated to maintain office productivity applications help desk or the organization that provides telephone services. This portion is important because is the part that “keeps the business running” (KTBR). In most IT organizations, the KTBR portion takes the lion’s share of the budget. The downside is that the KTBR is backward looking, and it’s only the leftover portion that can be applied to grow the business. There is another problem: the KTBR portion left unchecked tends to grow faster than IT budgets overall, and the situation can’t stay unchecked forever. A number of strategies have been used in IT organizations to keep the KTBR growth in check. Perhaps the most oft used in the past few years is the outsourcing of certain applications such as payroll and HR applications such as expense reports and the posting of open positions in the corporation.  When outsourcing (and perhaps off-shoring) is brought in, costs actually go up a notch as reorganizations take place and contracts are negotiated. Once the outsourcing plans are implemented costs may go down, but still have the problem of sustainability. Part of the initial cost reductions comes from salary arbitrage, especially when the service providers in lower cost countries.  Unfortunately the cost benefit from salary arbitrage tends to diminish with time as these countries advance technically and economically.last_img read more

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Come work with us! (at Freelancers Union)

first_imgFreelancers Union is hiring!Freelancers Union is the largest network of independent workers in the country, with over 240,000 members. Our members are part of a huge new economic shift (the era of big work is over) — and in the process they’re jumpstarting industries, hustling, making art, collaborating with one another, and redefining what “work” means.We’re not-your-typical nonprofit, and we look for not-your-typical employees. We’re collaborative, open-minded, adaptable, creative, and action-oriented. We work in a fast-paced and fun environment, and we’re constantly exploring interesting new ideas. If you’re an entrepreneurial-minded person with a side gig or passion project who loves talking to people, we want to hear from you.(In fact, we’re incomplete without you!)Here are some of the open positions:Communications AssociatePartner Sales ManagerProject ManagerSpecial Projects AssociateSoftware Engineer (Python and Django)Medical DirectorFront-end Developer (Freelance)If you don’t see something you like, feel free to email [email protected] with your application anyway! We can’t wait to hear from you.last_img read more

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Super 30 tax free in Delhi Anand to hold classes

first_imgNew Delhi: Hrithik Roshan-starrer Super30 was made tax free in Delhi recently as Patna-based Super30 programme founder Anand Kumar agreed to conduct one class every month for Class 11 and 12 students in government-run schools in the city. Super30 – based on the life of Anand Kumar – is also tax free in Gujarat, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Delhi Education Minister Manish Sisodia made the announcement shortly after Anand Kumar visited the Shaheed Hemu Kalani Sarvodaya Bal Vidyalaya in Lajpat Nagar in south Delhi and interacted with the students. Anand Kumar runs the Super30 programme for IIT-JEE aspirants from poor families. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: PriyankaHe selects 30 meritorious students from among economically backward sections of society and helps them to prepare for admission in the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT). “His work and personality are (an) inspiration for all (the) teachers across the country, as children from humble backgrounds achieve their IIT-JEE dreams. This is what it truly means to be a ‘guru’,” Sisodia tweeted. Sisodia said Anand Kumar had agreed to conduct one class every month for Delhi overnment school students. “This will be an online, virtual classroom for Class 11, 12 students of our schools.”last_img read more

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