Local media helps communities to cope after traumatic events

first_imgEmail Share on Twitter Share Analysis found that that communities coped by sticking together and sharing experiences. The role of the media impacted on how the community responded, with local media reportedly being sensitive and helping to facilitate community resilience and the national media largely being invasive.However, there were significant differences in how they reacted to the different tragedies.Suzanne Day said: “The results for the two events were very different with the floods (a natural event) providing evidence of communities pulling together in some cases and being pulled apart in others. This was mainly a result of relative deprivation with communities who perceived they received little support feeling alienated from the rest of the area. The communities that did receive external support banded together with a shared sense of collective identity.“During the shootings the community battened down the hatches not wanting support from any external agencies. Their strong sense of community was reinforced with the presence of national media, which at times they found intrusive. This was in contrast to the sensitive presence of local media which helped bond and strengthen the community.” Share on Facebookcenter_img LinkedIn Pinterest Local media’s sensitive approach to communities trying to cope in the face of trauma helps local people adapt to the stressful events by strengthening community bonds.This is one of the findings of a study by MSc student Suzanne Day from Lancaster University being presented today, Wednesday 6 May 2015, at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference in Liverpool.The study examined how West Cumbrian communities coped with two local traumatic events in a short space of time (the November 2009 floods and June 2010 Cumbria shootings). A total of 77 adults who were living and still live in the area at the time of the events completed a questionnaire about how much they had been affected. Ten also took part in interviews.last_img read more

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Genetic tug of war in the brain influences behavior

first_imgEmail Share on Facebook Not every mom and dad agree on how their offspring should behave. But in genetics as in life, parenting is about knowing when your voice needs to be heard, and the best ways of doing so. Typically, compromise reigns, and one copy of each gene is inherited from each parent so that the two contribute equally to the traits who make us who we are. Occasionally, a mechanism called genomic imprinting, first described 30 years ago, allows just one parent to be heard by completely silencing the other.Now, researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine report on a version of genetic parental control in mice that is more targeted, and subtle. Published in Cell Reports, so-called noncanonical imprinting is particularly prevalent in the brain, and skews the genetic message in subpopulations of cells so that mom, or dad, has a stronger say. The mechanism can influence offspring behavior, and because it is observed more frequently than classic imprinting, appears to be preferred.“The field has traditionally thought of genetics at the level of the whole animal, and sometimes the tissue. We’re documenting it at the cellular level,” says senior author Christopher Gregg, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology and anatomy. “Genetics is much more complicated than we thought.” A case in point is the impact of noncanonical signaling on motivated behaviors that prompt a timid mouse to leave its protective shelter when it needs to search for food. Five genes preferably controlled by mom, or dad, cluster within a biochemical pathway that creates serotonin and dopamine, neurochemicals that affect mood and behavior. The imprinting is further customized by being enriched in subregions of the brain known to control behavior (arcuate nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus). When the scientists remove the active, maternal copy of one of the genes, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th), they see a modest but consistent increase in the amount of time the mice spend out in the open, showing it controls the behavior. By contrast, mice with their silenced, paternal copy removed show no behavioral changes.“We speculate that a better strategy for imprinting is to do it in the cells that are needed to achieve the desired effect, rather than to do it in every tissue,” says Gregg.In total, 80 percent of 210 imprinted genes analyzed – the vast majority – were subject to noncanonical imprinting. 64 percent of those genes showed parental bias exclusively in the brain or subregions of the brain, and not in non-neural tissues, liver or muscle.A novel method that visualizes active copies of genes shows that the bias stems from differences within populations of cells. While canonically imprinted genes have just one active copy in nearly every cell examined, noncanonically imprinted genes have one active copy in subsets of cells, and two active copies in others.The results expand on previous work by another group who found a gene that imprints in specific neurons, and is reported to be associated with autism when mutated. This and the current study’s behavior experiments highlight that in addition to fine-tuning parental control, noncanonical imprinting may have a downside.Gregg speculates that the targeted form of imprinting gives rise to “high-risk” neurons that are especially vulnerable to mutations inherited from one parent because they don’t express a second, healthy back-up copy to compensate for the mistake. “We think that subpopulations of cells that preferentially express mutated genes could disproportionately contribute to brain disorders such as autism,” he says. Future research will test the hypothesis and novel therapies to overcome the deficits. Pinterestcenter_img LinkedIn Share on Twitter Sharelast_img read more

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Misconduct-related separation from the military linked with risk of being homeless

first_imgShare on Facebook Share on Twitter The analysis included 448,290 active-duty service members separated during this time period. Homelessness was determined by code (43 percent), participation in a homelessness program (35 percent), or both (27 percent). Although only 6 percent (n = 24,992) separated for misconduct, they represented 26 percent of homeless veterans at first VHA encounter (n = 322), 28 percent within 1 year (n = 1,141), and 21 percent within 5 years (n = 709). Incidence of homelessness was significantly greater for misconduct vs normal separations at first VHA encounter (1.3 percent vs 0.2 percent) and increased with time since first VHA encounter: within 1 year (5.4 percent vs 0.6 percent); at 5 years (9.8 percent vs 1.4 percent).The authors write that these findings support reports of recently returned veterans with records of misconduct having difficulties reentering civilian life. “This association takes on added significance because the incidence of misconduct-related separations is increasing at a time when ending homelessness among veterans is a federal government priority.”“Identification of those with misconduct-related separations and provision of case management and rehabilitative services at separation by the Department of Defense and the VHA should be investigated as methods to prevent homelessness.” Pinterest Emailcenter_img Among U.S. veterans who returned from Afghanistan and Iraq, being separated from the military for misconduct was associated with an increased risk of homelessness, according to a study in the August 25 issue of JAMA.Adi V. Gundlapalli, M.D., Ph.D., M.S., of the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, and colleagues analyzed Veterans Health Administration (VHA) data from U.S. active-duty military service members who were separated (end date of last deployment) from the military between October 2001 and December 2011, deployed in Afghanistan or Iraq, and eligible for and subsequently used VHA services. Homelessness was determined by a coding assignment of “lack of housing” during a VHA encounter, by participation in a VHA homelessness program, or both.The U.S. Department of Defense assigns a code upon separation from military service. These codes were categorized into misconduct (drugs, alcoholism, offenses, infractions, other), disability, early release, disqualified, normal, and other or unknown. LinkedIn Sharelast_img read more

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Relationship satisfaction depends on the mating pool, study finds

first_imgPinterest Share Relationship satisfaction and the energy devoted to keeping a partner are dependent on how the partner compares with other potential mates, a finding that relates to evolution’s stronghold on modern relationship psychology, according to a study at The University of Texas at Austin.When it comes to mating, people choose partners whose collective qualities most closely reflect what they would prefer in an ideal mate. They prioritize from an array of traits such as intelligence, health, kindness, attractiveness, dependability and financial prospects.UT Austin psychology researcher Daniel Conroy-Beam and his collaborators developed a method to test how mate preferences influence behavior and emotions in relationships in the study “What predicts romantic relationship satisfaction and mate retention intensity: mate preference fulfillment or mate value discrepancies?” in-press in Evolution & Human Behavior. LinkedIn “Few decisions impact fitness more than mate selection, so natural selection has endowed us with a set of powerfully motivating mate preferences,” Conroy-Beam said. “We demonstrate that mate preferences continue to shape our feelings and behaviors within relationships in at least two key ways: by interacting with nuanced emotional systems such as how happy we are with our partner and by influencing how much or little effort we devote to keeping them.”For the study, researchers simulated a mating pool from 119 men and 140 women who had been in relationships for an average of 7½ years. Each participant rated the importance of 27 traits in an ideal mate and the extent to which they felt each trait described both their actual partner and themselves. Researchers then used their new method to calculate each of the participants’ and their partners’ mate value, or desirability within the mating pool as determined by the group’s average ideal preferences.Participants also reported their relationship satisfaction and happiness. The study discovered that satisfaction was not reliably dependent on how a partner compared with a person’s idea of the perfect mate, but rather whether others in the mating pool better matched a person’s ideal preferences.Those with partners more desirable than themselves were satisfied whether or not their partners matched their ideal preferences. But, participants with partners less desirable than themselves were happy with their relationship only if their partner fulfilled their ideal preferences better than most other potential mates in the group, Conroy-Beam said.“Satisfaction and happiness are not as clear cut as we think they are,” Conroy-Beam said. “We do not need ideal partners for relationship bliss. Instead, satisfaction appears to come, in part, from getting the best partner available to us.”In a follow-up study, the researchers again tested relationship satisfaction but also surveyed participants’ mate retention efforts — energy devoted to maintaining their relationships. They found that people with partners difficult to replace, either because their partner was more desirable than themselves or their partner more closely matched their ideal preferences than others in the group, reported being happier and devoted more effort to mate retention. This included making themselves extra attractive for their partners and “mate guarding,” or shielding their partners from mating rivals to help keep their partners, Conroy-Beam said.“Relationship dissatisfaction and mate guarding intensity, in turn, are key processes linked to outcomes such as infidelity and breaking up, both of which can be costly in evolutionary currencies,” said co-author and psychology professor David Buss. “Mate preferences matter beyond initial mate selection, profoundly influencing both relationship dynamics and effort devoted to keeping partners. Mates gained often have to be retained to reap the adaptive rewards inherent in pair-bonding — an evolutionary hallmark of our species.”center_img Email Share on Facebook Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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New neurons reveal clues about an individual’s autism

first_imgThe brains of some people with autism spectrum disorder grow faster than usual early on in life, often before diagnosis. A new study co-led by Salk Institute scientists has employed a cutting-edge stem cell technique to unravel the mechanisms driving the mysterious phenomenon of excess brain growth, which affects as many as 30 percent of people with autism.The findings, published July 6, 2016 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, show that it is possible to use stem cell reprogramming technologies developed in the past decade to model the earliest stages of complex disorders and to evaluate potential therapeutic drugs.Intriguingly, the Salk team found that stem cell-derived neurons made fewer connections in the dish compared to cells from healthy individuals. Furthermore, the scientists were able to restore communication between the cells by adding IGF-1, a drug currently being evaluated in clinical trials of autism. “This technology allows us to generate views of neuron development that have historically been intractable,” says senior investigator Rusty Gage, a professor in Salk’s Laboratory of Genetics and holder of the Vi and John Adler Chair for Research on Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases. “We’re excited by the possibility of using stem cell methods to unravel the biology of autism and to possibly screen for new drug treatments for this debilitating disorder.”Autism, which affects approximately 1 out of every 68 children in the United States, is characterized by problems communicating, difficulties interacting with others, and in repetitive behaviors, although the symptoms range dramatically in type and severity. There is no known cause of autism.In 2010, Gage, Carol Marchetto of Salk’s Laboratory of Genetics, Alysson Muotri of the University of California, San Diego, and their collaborators showed they could recreate features of Rett syndrome–a rare disorder that shares features of autism but is caused by mutations in a single gene–in a petri dish.They did so by taking skin cells from patients, adding a mix of chemicals that instructed those cells to form stem cells, and in turn, coaxing their new stem cells into neurons. The ability to form what’s called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from human cells was pioneered by researchers in 2007, but some scientists were initially skeptical that the new technology could lend insight into complex heritable disorders such as autism.“In that study, induced pluripotent stem cells gave us a window into the birth of a neuron that we would not otherwise have,” says Marchetto, a senior staff scientist and the study’s first author. “Seeing features of Rett syndrome in a dish gave us the confidence to next study classical autism.”In the new study, collaborating with Muotri and other scientists at UCSD once more, Gage’s team created stem cells from a subset of people with autism whose brains had grown up to 23 percent faster than usual during toddlerhood but had subsequently normalized.The neuron precursor cells derived from the patients multiplied faster than those of typically developing individuals. The finding supports a theory some experts have put forth that brain enlargement is caused by disruptions to the cell’s normal cycle of division, Marchetto says. In addition, the stem cell-derived neurons of individuals with autism behaved abnormally, bursting with activity less often compared with those cells of healthy people.Those neurons’ activity seemed to improve by adding IGF-1, which is known to enhance the connections between neurons. The group plans to use the patient cells to investigate the molecular mechanisms behind IGF-1’s effects, in particular probing for changes in gene expression with treatment.Although the newly derived cells are far from patients’ brains, a brain cell by itself may reveal important clues about a person, Marchetto says. “It never fails to amaze me when we can see similarities between the characteristics of the cells in the dish and the human disease,” she adds. Pinterest Share on Twitter Share on Facebookcenter_img Share LinkedIn Emaillast_img read more

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Narcissists have reduced motivation in subordinate positions

first_imgExperiment 2 repeated the first with a sample of 135 participants (63 female), but they were instead informed that the psychological test had nothing to do with their assignments. A self-interest measure was added to determine if it was related to role assignment reactions. It was found that narcissism was still associated with negative reactions to follower roles, even after the illusion of test-based assignments was removed. Motivation for self-interest was also reduced by being assigned to the leadership role.The third study looked at the impact of role assignment on a trait narcissist’s willingness to contribute to the collective good of the group. The design of Study 1 was once again repeated but with an additional measure for willingness to contribute. Participants with high rates of narcissism were less willing when assigned to be followers, signifying a potential point of group disruption.Finally, the fourth experiment examined the association as it may exist in sports teams, which represent a real-world example with many dynamic roles. Researchers recruited 213 participants, all of which were female flag-football players. Data was obtained using questionnaires filled out by the subjects at various times throughout a tournament.Narcissism was associated with both displeasure in roles perceived as being “lesser”, as well as an increased likelihood of perceiving their assigned positions as being below their abilities. Taken in combination, the four parts of this investigation clearly demonstrate that, when placed in a role perceived as being subordinate, narcissistic personalities can have a disruptive effect on group environments in both theoretical and practical contexts. Share on Facebook Pinterest Share LinkedIncenter_img Email Share on Twitter The personality trait known as narcissism is associated with a number of potentially troublesome personal characteristics, like entitlement and a general disregard for others. People who display excessive narcissism typically desire positions of leadership, status and power. Ample research has already been performed on the impact of narcissistic personalities when placed in leadership roles, but less is known about their impact when placed in subordinate positions within a company.A 2016 article in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin by Alex J. Benson, Christian H. Jordan and Amy M. Christie has shown that narcissism may support a resistance to follower roles that can be disruptive to group functioning.Four studies were included in this investigation. The first included 105 subjects (66 female) who were assigned to either a low (follower) or high status (leader) role. Narcissism was measured with a 40 item inventory prior to role assignment and the experiment concluded with a self-report of role satisfaction. Before being assigned, subjects also participated in a staged psychological test to make them believe that their assignments would be based on these results. Subjects high in narcissism were more satisfied with leadership positions and less so as followers when compared to those with lower scores in the trait.last_img read more

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Antisocial behavior associated with abnormal white matter brain structure in men with callous-unemotional traits

first_imgPinterest Share on Facebook LinkedIn Email Share on Twittercenter_img Share A study published in NeuroImage: Clinical provides new insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of antisocial behaviors. The research indicates that the combination of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits is associated with alterations in neural networks involved in fear conditioning, reward processing, and inhibitory control.“In my research broadly I’m interested in understanding the development of antisocial behavior, including criminality and aggression, in the hopes of informing more effective preventative strategies and interventions,” explained Hailey Dotterer, the corresponding author of the study and doctoral candidate at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor.“Previous work has identified neurobiological processes that appear to contribute to impulse control and emotional regulation, which are both impaired in antisocial behavior. Understanding brain-behavior associations therefore could give researchers a better idea of how antisocial behavior emerges, and, in the long term, a better idea of how to treat it.” The researchers examined data from 178 participants who were part of The Pitt Mother & Child Project, a long-running longitudinal study of 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys and their families.As part of that study, participants underwent a magnetic resonance imaging scanning session at age 20 to assess functional connectivity in the brain. The participants also completed questionnaires that assessed antisocial behavior (such as vandalism, stealing, and physical aggression) and callous-unemotional traits (such as lack of empathy).“In the current study, there were no associations between white matter microstructure and antisocial behavior or callous-unemotional traits on their own. Instead, we found that specifically the combination of high levels of antisocial behavior and high levels of callous-unemotional traits were associated with widespread differences in white matter within the brain,” Dotterer told PsyPost. “White matter fibers represent the physical connections between different areas in the brain. Changes or disruptions in these connections may impact brain functioning and partially contribute to impulse control and emotion regulation deficits within severe manifestations of antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits.”The study — like all research — includes some limitations.“Future research will be needed to determine whether our findings replicate in different populations, including clinical populations that have higher prevalence for antisocial behavior and callous-unemotional traits,” Dotterer explained.“Additionally, these analyses cannot determine causality. That is, it is unclear whether antisocial behavior leads to changes in white matter, or vice versa, or whether an additional, unmeasured factor (e.g., substance use, chronic stress) explains these associations. Longitudinal work that measures both behavior and white matter over the course of development could provide a better idea of why and how these associations emerge in young adulthood.”The study, “Antisocial behavior with callous-unemotional traits is associated with widespread disruptions to white matter structural connectivity among low-income, urban males“, was authored by Hailey L. Dotterer, Rebecca Waller, Daniel S. Shaw, John Plass, David Brang, Erika E. Forbes, and Luke W. Hyde.last_img read more

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Young children think that those who receive help are less smart, study finds

first_imgShare on Facebook Share Young children often think that groups who receive help are less smart than those who don’t receive such help, according to new research published in the journal Child Development.“This research examines how young children perceive helping behavior. Understanding what helping signals to young children is important because children, by virtue of their age, receive a great deal of help from others that is often foundational to their academic and social development,” said study author Jellie Sierksma, an assistant professor at VU Amsterdam.“We were specifically interested in understanding the inferences children make when groups of children do or do not receive help from an adult, given that help is often given based on the groups children belong to (e.g., due to educational tracking at school).” LinkedIn In three experiments with 216 children who were 4 to 6 years old, the participants were shown videos of groups of cartoon children engaging in various activities, such as solving a puzzle. In the videos, one group received help from an adult while the other group did not. After watching the videos, the participants were asked if they thought one group was smarter or nicer than another.The researchers found that the children tended to think that groups who received help were less smart, but they did not perceive either group as nicer.“We show that a large majority of young children think that groups and group members who receive help are less smart. The current research thus provides evidence for the idea that helping can serve as a social signal to children, supporting the formation of biased inferences about groups,” Sierksma told PsyPost.“That children as young as 4 years make these inferences underlines how powerful observing differential helping could be in guiding children’s view of groups and individuals.”The findings might hold significance for educators.“The implications of this work are twofold. First, the findings underscore how much children learn about the social world by watching adults. Here we show that adults’ differential helping can function as a social signal to children eager to learn about their social world,” Sierksma explained.“Second, the findings have implications for thinking about ability grouping, an educational practice that is implemented across the world with the main aim of helping children of all levels acquire academic success. However, by creating groups of children based on their competence, these practices also set the stage for group-based helping. As such, tracking may ironically contribute to the perpetuation of inequality as children observe and make inferences about group members’ competence.”But the study — like all research — includes some limitations. “It is important to keep in mind that we tested children of one age group in a controlled lab setting. It will be important for future research to address what happens in more naturalistic settings (e.g., actual classrooms with real teachers) and with children of different ages,” Sierksma said.The study, “When Helping Hurts: Children Think Groups That Receive Help Are Less Smart“, was authored by Jellie Sierksma and Kristin Shutts.center_img Email Share on Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

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FLU NEWS SCAN: EU H1N1 response, flu vigilance in Europe, flu vaccine coverage, avian flu import rule

first_imgJan 25, 2011EU Parliament calls for steps to address ‘disproportionate’ H1N1 responseIn a resolution adopted today, a committee of the European Union’s (EU’s) Parliament recommended that the EU consider the expense of vaccination against the relative risk of a future influenza pandemic, as well as consider cooperative purchasing of vaccines and provide more safeguards against conflicts of interest. The author of the resolution, France’s Michele Rivasi, said in a press release, “This report is an important attempt to highlight the concerns that have been raised about the disproportionate response to the swine flu in Europe, as well as the potential influence of pharmaceutical companies in response processes.” The measure passed the Parliament’s Public Health Committee 58 to 2, with 1 abstention. The resolution recommends that member nations cooperate better to enable mass buying of vaccines, that the names of expert advisers should be published, and that “liability for vaccines” must remain with drug manufacturers. It also calls upon the World Health Organization (WHO) to review its definition of “pandemic” to include disease severity. Last June a health committee of the parliamentary body of the Council of Europe—which is a separate body from the EU—passed a harsh critique of the WHO’s response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.Jan 25 EU Parliament press releaseJun 24, 2010, CIDRAP News story on Council of Europe critiqueECDC calls for heightened flu vigilanceThe European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) urged taking precautions this year similar to those taken in an average seasonal flu, with some adjustments, given the predominance of the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus in Europe, including the fact that it has caused 90% of flu deaths. In a risk assessment released today, the ECDC said, “Many of the features and required countermeasures are the same as for the previous seasonal influenzas. However, there are important differences which Europe needs to take into consideration, notably the type of people who are most affected and experiencing severe disease.” Those disproportionately affected by severe disease this year, as during the pandemic, are those under age 65, the report says. In addition, some regions, such as the United Kingdom, are seeing more cases of serious illness than during the pandemic. The report recommends increased respiratory and hand hygiene, vaccination, use of antiviral drugs in those with severe flu-like illness, increased vigilance in the healthcare community, and broad sharing of clinical information.Jan 25 ECDC risk assessmentHispanic seniors less likely to get seasonal flu vaccineHispanic men and women 65 and older are less likely to receive the seasonal flu vaccine than their white contemporaries, according to a new Rand Corp. study in Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, Hispanic seniors who prefer speaking Spanish and live in newer Hispanic communities where Spanish is predominant are least likely to be vaccinated. Researchers analyzed data from more than 244,000 seniors surveyed in 2008 as part of a federal project and found that 68% of English-speaking and 64% of Spanish-speaking Hispanic seniors had received flu vaccine, compared with 76% of matched white seniors. “These findings suggest new strategies may be needed to target an important problem,” said Rand statistician Amelia Haviland, the study’s lead author, in a press release.Jan 24 Arch Intern Med abstractJan 24 Rand Corp. press releaseUSDA posts more stringent avian flu import ruleTo prevent the introduction of avian flu into the United States, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday issued an interim rule prohibiting the importation of birds and poultry products from regions in which any highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) subtype has been confirmed. The previous rule restricted entry of birds or products only from regions in which the H5N1 strain had been detected. The USDA also added restrictions for live poultry, hatching eggs, and other birds that have been vaccinated for any H5 or H7 subtype of HPAI or that have moved through regions where any HPAI subtype exists. Nonvaccinated birds or hatching eggs must be accompanied by a certificate verifying their status. Comments on the new rule will be received till Mar 25.Jan 24 USDA news releaseJan 24 Federal Register text of rulelast_img read more

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Flu Scan for Feb 21, 2014

first_img1,500 chickens culled for H5N1 in NepalAfter about 300 chickens on a farm in Nepal died mysteriously, H5N1 avian flu was confirmed and 1,552 chickens on that and a neighboring farm as well as 30 crates of eggs were destroyed yesterday by a rapid response team, according to a story in Republica, a Nepalese newspaper.The farms are in Itahari in the southeast district of Sunsari. Dr. Bodh Raj Parajuli, director of the Regional Veterinary Directorate at Biratnagar, said chickens and other domestic birds within a 500-meter radius of the two farms would be destroyed, says the article. Poultry farmers are being urged to report any symptoms of illness in their flocks.Large outbreaks of H5N1 in Nepal were reported late last year.Feb 20 Republica story Most recent (Nov 13, 2013) CIDRAP News item on H5N1 in Nepal WHO holds mission in Egypt to lend support surrounding H1N1 fluEgypt’s Ministry of Health and Population (MoHP) has received help from the World Health Organization (WHO) in the midst of a rash of 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza cases, according to a WHO statement yesterday.According to the WHO, the large number of H1N1 cases is not unexpected, as the strain is hitting many areas of the world hard this flu season. The number of cases this season is similar to the number last flu season, but many areas are reporting an increase in severe cases. The 2009 H1N1 type of flu tends to affect young adults in larger numbers than typical seasonal influenza strains.The H1N1 cases appear to have peaked about 2 weeks ago, said Anthony Mounts, MD, leader of the epidemiologic portion of WHO’s Egyptian mission, and numbers are likely to decline going forward.The WHO gave recommendations to MoHP for improving early detection and notification of influenza-like illness and severe respiratory events. The organization also worked with MoHP on educating critical care doctors in Egypt on specimen collection, care of critically ill patients, and infection control, and it worked with MoHP staff on appropriate risk communications.Henk Bekedam, WHO’s representative in Egypt, said that “On the whole, Egypt has a well-established and -functioning surveillance system.”Feb 20 WHO statementlast_img read more

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